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Effects of Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Motion in Healthy Subjects Using Cine Breathing Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Kotani T, Akazawa T, Sakuma T, Nagaya S, Sonoda M, Tanaka Y, Katogi T, Nemoto T, Minami S - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Bottom Line: After training, there were significant improvements in vital capacity (VC) from 3.58±0.8 L to 3.74±0.8 L and in %VC from 107.4±10.8 to 112.1±8.2.Significant changes were observed in the right diaphragm motion, right chest wall motion, and left chest wall motion, which were increased from 55.7±9.6 mm to 63.4±10.2 mm, from 15.6±6.1 mm to 23.4±10.4 mm, and from 16.3±7.6 mm to 22.0±9.8 mm, respectively.Two weeks of training using incentive spirometry provided improvements in pulmonary function and respiratory motion, which suggested that incentive spirometry may be a useful preoperative modality for improving pulmonary function during the perioperative period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seirei Sakura Citizen Hospital, Chiba, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of incentive spirometry on respiratory motion in healthy subjects using cine breathing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Methods: Ten non-smoking healthy subjects without any history of respiratory disease were studied. Subjects were asked to perform pulmonary training using incentive spirometry every day for two weeks. To assess the effectiveness of this training, pulmonary function tests and cine breathing MRI were performed before starting pulmonary training and two weeks after its completion.

Results: After training, there were significant improvements in vital capacity (VC) from 3.58±0.8 L to 3.74±0.8 L and in %VC from 107.4±10.8 to 112.1±8.2. Significant changes were observed in the right diaphragm motion, right chest wall motion, and left chest wall motion, which were increased from 55.7±9.6 mm to 63.4±10.2 mm, from 15.6±6.1 mm to 23.4±10.4 mm, and from 16.3±7.6 mm to 22.0±9.8 mm, respectively.

Conclusion: Two weeks of training using incentive spirometry provided improvements in pulmonary function and respiratory motion, which suggested that incentive spirometry may be a useful preoperative modality for improving pulmonary function during the perioperative period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Right midsagittal maximal inspiratory (A) and expiratory (B) images. We drew a line tangent to the lung apex and perpendicular to the vertical magnetic resonance imaging frame. The distances from this line to the diaphragm at its highest point are defined as the maximum dimension (Di) or minimum dimension (De), respectively.
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Figure 1: Right midsagittal maximal inspiratory (A) and expiratory (B) images. We drew a line tangent to the lung apex and perpendicular to the vertical magnetic resonance imaging frame. The distances from this line to the diaphragm at its highest point are defined as the maximum dimension (Di) or minimum dimension (De), respectively.

Mentions: Images at maximum full inspiration and minimum full expiration were identified in each dynamic sequence. In the sagittal and axial planes, respiratory motions of the right and left thorax were measured separately. In the midsagittal planes, a line was drawn tangent to the lung apex and perpendicular to the vertical MRI frame. On the full inspiratory and full expiratory images, the distances from this line to the diaphragm at its highest point were defined as the maximum dimension (Di) and minimum dimension (De), respectively. Diaphragm motion was defined as the difference between Di and De (Fig. 1). Chest wall dimensions in the anteroposterior diameter of the thorax in the axial planes were also measured (Fig. 2). The results for BMRI variables were expressed as mean±standard deviation.


Effects of Incentive Spirometry on Respiratory Motion in Healthy Subjects Using Cine Breathing Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Kotani T, Akazawa T, Sakuma T, Nagaya S, Sonoda M, Tanaka Y, Katogi T, Nemoto T, Minami S - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Right midsagittal maximal inspiratory (A) and expiratory (B) images. We drew a line tangent to the lung apex and perpendicular to the vertical magnetic resonance imaging frame. The distances from this line to the diaphragm at its highest point are defined as the maximum dimension (Di) or minimum dimension (De), respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496506&req=5

Figure 1: Right midsagittal maximal inspiratory (A) and expiratory (B) images. We drew a line tangent to the lung apex and perpendicular to the vertical magnetic resonance imaging frame. The distances from this line to the diaphragm at its highest point are defined as the maximum dimension (Di) or minimum dimension (De), respectively.
Mentions: Images at maximum full inspiration and minimum full expiration were identified in each dynamic sequence. In the sagittal and axial planes, respiratory motions of the right and left thorax were measured separately. In the midsagittal planes, a line was drawn tangent to the lung apex and perpendicular to the vertical MRI frame. On the full inspiratory and full expiratory images, the distances from this line to the diaphragm at its highest point were defined as the maximum dimension (Di) and minimum dimension (De), respectively. Diaphragm motion was defined as the difference between Di and De (Fig. 1). Chest wall dimensions in the anteroposterior diameter of the thorax in the axial planes were also measured (Fig. 2). The results for BMRI variables were expressed as mean±standard deviation.

Bottom Line: After training, there were significant improvements in vital capacity (VC) from 3.58±0.8 L to 3.74±0.8 L and in %VC from 107.4±10.8 to 112.1±8.2.Significant changes were observed in the right diaphragm motion, right chest wall motion, and left chest wall motion, which were increased from 55.7±9.6 mm to 63.4±10.2 mm, from 15.6±6.1 mm to 23.4±10.4 mm, and from 16.3±7.6 mm to 22.0±9.8 mm, respectively.Two weeks of training using incentive spirometry provided improvements in pulmonary function and respiratory motion, which suggested that incentive spirometry may be a useful preoperative modality for improving pulmonary function during the perioperative period.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seirei Sakura Citizen Hospital, Chiba, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of incentive spirometry on respiratory motion in healthy subjects using cine breathing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Methods: Ten non-smoking healthy subjects without any history of respiratory disease were studied. Subjects were asked to perform pulmonary training using incentive spirometry every day for two weeks. To assess the effectiveness of this training, pulmonary function tests and cine breathing MRI were performed before starting pulmonary training and two weeks after its completion.

Results: After training, there were significant improvements in vital capacity (VC) from 3.58±0.8 L to 3.74±0.8 L and in %VC from 107.4±10.8 to 112.1±8.2. Significant changes were observed in the right diaphragm motion, right chest wall motion, and left chest wall motion, which were increased from 55.7±9.6 mm to 63.4±10.2 mm, from 15.6±6.1 mm to 23.4±10.4 mm, and from 16.3±7.6 mm to 22.0±9.8 mm, respectively.

Conclusion: Two weeks of training using incentive spirometry provided improvements in pulmonary function and respiratory motion, which suggested that incentive spirometry may be a useful preoperative modality for improving pulmonary function during the perioperative period.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus