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Adapting Metacognitive Therapy to Children with Generalised Anxiety Disorder: Suggestions for a Manual.

Esbjørn BH, Normann N, Reinholdt-Dunne ML - J Contemp Psychother (2015)

Bottom Line: Overall, the intervention relied heavily on practising MCT techniques in vivo with therapist assistance.A detailed description of how the manual was adapted for this age group is given, and examples from a group of four children are presented in a case series.Findings indicate that the adapted version of the metacognitive techniques and manual for children is feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2A, 1353 Copenhagen K, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

The metacognitive model and therapy has proven to be a promising theory and intervention for emotional disorders in adults. The model has also received empirical support in normal and clinical child samples. The purpose of the present study was to adapt metacognitive therapy to children (MCT-c) with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and create suggestions for an adapted manual. The adaptation was based on the structure and techniques used in MCT for adults with GAD. However, the developmental limitations of children were taken into account. For instance, therapy was aided with worksheets, practical exercises and delivered in a group format. Overall, the intervention relied heavily on practising MCT techniques in vivo with therapist assistance. A detailed description of how the manual was adapted for this age group is given, and examples from a group of four children are presented in a case series. Findings indicate that the adapted version of the metacognitive techniques and manual for children is feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Parent-reported symptoms
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig1: Parent-reported symptoms

Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 display parent- and child-reported internalizing symptoms as measured by the RCADS across time. Despite some differences in parent- and child report, a similar tendency of a decline in symptoms from pre- to post-treatment is observed for all cases, although there was a marked discrepancy between parent- and child-report for Participant 4. We did not find any systematic change from posttreatment to follow-up.Fig. 1


Adapting Metacognitive Therapy to Children with Generalised Anxiety Disorder: Suggestions for a Manual.

Esbjørn BH, Normann N, Reinholdt-Dunne ML - J Contemp Psychother (2015)

Parent-reported symptoms
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496502&req=5

Fig1: Parent-reported symptoms
Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 display parent- and child-reported internalizing symptoms as measured by the RCADS across time. Despite some differences in parent- and child report, a similar tendency of a decline in symptoms from pre- to post-treatment is observed for all cases, although there was a marked discrepancy between parent- and child-report for Participant 4. We did not find any systematic change from posttreatment to follow-up.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Overall, the intervention relied heavily on practising MCT techniques in vivo with therapist assistance.A detailed description of how the manual was adapted for this age group is given, and examples from a group of four children are presented in a case series.Findings indicate that the adapted version of the metacognitive techniques and manual for children is feasible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 2A, 1353 Copenhagen K, Copenhagen, Denmark.

ABSTRACT

The metacognitive model and therapy has proven to be a promising theory and intervention for emotional disorders in adults. The model has also received empirical support in normal and clinical child samples. The purpose of the present study was to adapt metacognitive therapy to children (MCT-c) with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) and create suggestions for an adapted manual. The adaptation was based on the structure and techniques used in MCT for adults with GAD. However, the developmental limitations of children were taken into account. For instance, therapy was aided with worksheets, practical exercises and delivered in a group format. Overall, the intervention relied heavily on practising MCT techniques in vivo with therapist assistance. A detailed description of how the manual was adapted for this age group is given, and examples from a group of four children are presented in a case series. Findings indicate that the adapted version of the metacognitive techniques and manual for children is feasible.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus