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Stabilisation of Laryngeal AL Amyloidosis with Long Term Curcumin Therapy.

Golombick T, Diamond TH, Manoharan A, Ramakrishna R - Case Rep Hematol (2015)

Bottom Line: Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs.In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins.This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, St George Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2217, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Multiple myeloma (MM), smoldering myeloma (SMM), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) represent a spectrum of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs). Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL) falls within the spectrum of these diseases and has a mortality rate of more than 80% within 2 years of diagnosis. Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs. In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins. We thus administered curcumin to a patient with laryngeal amyloidosis and smoldering myeloma and found that the patient has shown a lack of progression of his disease for a period of five years. This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. We recommend further evaluation of curcumin in patients with primary AL amyloidosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Amyloid tumour of the larynx. X 40—connective tissue partly covered by squamous mucosa. Within the connective tissue is eosinophilic material which stains positively with Congo red. This Congo red stained material shows apple green birefringence under polarised light. The appearances are consistent with amyloid.
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fig2: Amyloid tumour of the larynx. X 40—connective tissue partly covered by squamous mucosa. Within the connective tissue is eosinophilic material which stains positively with Congo red. This Congo red stained material shows apple green birefringence under polarised light. The appearances are consistent with amyloid.

Mentions: A 72-year-old male patient presented to the Haematology Clinic in 2006 for evaluation of laryngeal amyloidosis, secondary to smoldering myeloma. This was incidentally discovered by Doppler studies after being investigated for a cerebrovascular event. He denied symptoms of dysphagia or dysphonia. His comorbidities included spinal canal stenosis due to osteoarthritis, diet controlled diabetes, and hypertension. He had no history of fever, weight loss, recurrent infections, or skeletal events. Direct laryngoscopy confirmed an expansion of the supraglottis without evidence of soft tissue invasion or fixation to the prevertebral tissue. This involved mostly the region of the aryepiglottic fold and extended down to the false vocal fold on the right side causing effacement of the right pyriform fossa (Figure 1). It was submucosal without ulceration. Vocal cord mobility was normal and there was no evidence of lymphadenopathy. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of amyloidosis, as an AL type (Figure 2). A diagnosis of SMM was established by bone marrow dyscrasia (18% plasma cell infiltration, IgG lambda) and an elevated plasma paraprotein (14 g/L) but a negative 24-hour urine Bence Jones protein. The B2 microglobulin (2.2 mg/L), EUC, and calcium levels were normal. A skeletal survey, and chest, abdomen, and pelvic CT scan excluded lytic and soft tissue lesions. Antimyeloma therapy was not initiated as he was otherwise asymptomatic.


Stabilisation of Laryngeal AL Amyloidosis with Long Term Curcumin Therapy.

Golombick T, Diamond TH, Manoharan A, Ramakrishna R - Case Rep Hematol (2015)

Amyloid tumour of the larynx. X 40—connective tissue partly covered by squamous mucosa. Within the connective tissue is eosinophilic material which stains positively with Congo red. This Congo red stained material shows apple green birefringence under polarised light. The appearances are consistent with amyloid.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496470&req=5

fig2: Amyloid tumour of the larynx. X 40—connective tissue partly covered by squamous mucosa. Within the connective tissue is eosinophilic material which stains positively with Congo red. This Congo red stained material shows apple green birefringence under polarised light. The appearances are consistent with amyloid.
Mentions: A 72-year-old male patient presented to the Haematology Clinic in 2006 for evaluation of laryngeal amyloidosis, secondary to smoldering myeloma. This was incidentally discovered by Doppler studies after being investigated for a cerebrovascular event. He denied symptoms of dysphagia or dysphonia. His comorbidities included spinal canal stenosis due to osteoarthritis, diet controlled diabetes, and hypertension. He had no history of fever, weight loss, recurrent infections, or skeletal events. Direct laryngoscopy confirmed an expansion of the supraglottis without evidence of soft tissue invasion or fixation to the prevertebral tissue. This involved mostly the region of the aryepiglottic fold and extended down to the false vocal fold on the right side causing effacement of the right pyriform fossa (Figure 1). It was submucosal without ulceration. Vocal cord mobility was normal and there was no evidence of lymphadenopathy. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of amyloidosis, as an AL type (Figure 2). A diagnosis of SMM was established by bone marrow dyscrasia (18% plasma cell infiltration, IgG lambda) and an elevated plasma paraprotein (14 g/L) but a negative 24-hour urine Bence Jones protein. The B2 microglobulin (2.2 mg/L), EUC, and calcium levels were normal. A skeletal survey, and chest, abdomen, and pelvic CT scan excluded lytic and soft tissue lesions. Antimyeloma therapy was not initiated as he was otherwise asymptomatic.

Bottom Line: Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs.In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins.This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, St George Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2217, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Multiple myeloma (MM), smoldering myeloma (SMM), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) represent a spectrum of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs). Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL) falls within the spectrum of these diseases and has a mortality rate of more than 80% within 2 years of diagnosis. Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs. In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins. We thus administered curcumin to a patient with laryngeal amyloidosis and smoldering myeloma and found that the patient has shown a lack of progression of his disease for a period of five years. This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. We recommend further evaluation of curcumin in patients with primary AL amyloidosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus