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Mental State Inferences Abilities Contribution to Verbal Irony Comprehension in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

Gaudreau G, Monetta L, Macoir J, Poulin S, Laforce R, Hudon C - Behav Neurol (2015)

Bottom Line: Findings indicated that participants with MCI have second-order mentalizing difficulties compared to HC subjects.Moreover, MCI participants were impaired compared to the HC group in identifying ironic or sincere stories, both requiring mental inference capacities.These findings support previous data suggesting a strong relationship between irony comprehension and mentalizing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: École de Psychologie, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6 ; Centre de Recherche de l'Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Québec, Québec, QC, Canada G1J 2G3.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The present study examined mentalizing capacities as well as the relative implication of mentalizing in the comprehension of ironic and sincere assertions among 30 older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 30 healthy control (HC) subjects.

Method: Subjects were administered a task evaluating mentalizing by means of short stories. A verbal irony comprehension task, in which participants had to identify ironic or sincere statements within short stories, was also administered; the design of the task allowed uniform implication of mentalizing across the conditions.

Results: Findings indicated that participants with MCI have second-order mentalizing difficulties compared to HC subjects. Moreover, MCI participants were impaired compared to the HC group in identifying ironic or sincere stories, both requiring mental inference capacities.

Conclusion: This study suggests that, in individuals with MCI, difficulties in the comprehension of ironic and sincere assertions are closely related to second-order mentalizing deficits. These findings support previous data suggesting a strong relationship between irony comprehension and mentalizing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean (±SEM) proportions of correct scores on second-order mentalizing, nonsocial reasoning, and first-order mentalizing of the Combined Stories Test. MCI = elderly persons with mild cognitive impairment; HC = healthy controls participants; SEM = standard error of the mean ∗∗p < 0.01.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Mean (±SEM) proportions of correct scores on second-order mentalizing, nonsocial reasoning, and first-order mentalizing of the Combined Stories Test. MCI = elderly persons with mild cognitive impairment; HC = healthy controls participants; SEM = standard error of the mean ∗∗p < 0.01.

Mentions: Two participants out of 30 were excluded from the MCI group because of missing data or withdrawal from the study. Thus, 28 MCI participants were included in the final analyses. Figure 1 reports the mean (±SEM) total correct scores for first- and second-order mentalizing, as well as nonsocial reasoning of the Combined Stories Test. The analyses revealed that MCI participants had more difficulty than the HC group in correctly answering the second-order mentalizing questions, t(57) = −2.74, p = 0.003, and d = .98. However, the groups were comparable regarding their capacity to answer nonsocial reasoning, t(57) = −1.48, p = 0.145, and d = .16, and first-order mentalizing, t(57) = −0.51, p = 0.609, and d = .03, questions.


Mental State Inferences Abilities Contribution to Verbal Irony Comprehension in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment.

Gaudreau G, Monetta L, Macoir J, Poulin S, Laforce R, Hudon C - Behav Neurol (2015)

Mean (±SEM) proportions of correct scores on second-order mentalizing, nonsocial reasoning, and first-order mentalizing of the Combined Stories Test. MCI = elderly persons with mild cognitive impairment; HC = healthy controls participants; SEM = standard error of the mean ∗∗p < 0.01.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496467&req=5

fig1: Mean (±SEM) proportions of correct scores on second-order mentalizing, nonsocial reasoning, and first-order mentalizing of the Combined Stories Test. MCI = elderly persons with mild cognitive impairment; HC = healthy controls participants; SEM = standard error of the mean ∗∗p < 0.01.
Mentions: Two participants out of 30 were excluded from the MCI group because of missing data or withdrawal from the study. Thus, 28 MCI participants were included in the final analyses. Figure 1 reports the mean (±SEM) total correct scores for first- and second-order mentalizing, as well as nonsocial reasoning of the Combined Stories Test. The analyses revealed that MCI participants had more difficulty than the HC group in correctly answering the second-order mentalizing questions, t(57) = −2.74, p = 0.003, and d = .98. However, the groups were comparable regarding their capacity to answer nonsocial reasoning, t(57) = −1.48, p = 0.145, and d = .16, and first-order mentalizing, t(57) = −0.51, p = 0.609, and d = .03, questions.

Bottom Line: Findings indicated that participants with MCI have second-order mentalizing difficulties compared to HC subjects.Moreover, MCI participants were impaired compared to the HC group in identifying ironic or sincere stories, both requiring mental inference capacities.These findings support previous data suggesting a strong relationship between irony comprehension and mentalizing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: École de Psychologie, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6 ; Centre de Recherche de l'Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Québec, Québec, QC, Canada G1J 2G3.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The present study examined mentalizing capacities as well as the relative implication of mentalizing in the comprehension of ironic and sincere assertions among 30 older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 30 healthy control (HC) subjects.

Method: Subjects were administered a task evaluating mentalizing by means of short stories. A verbal irony comprehension task, in which participants had to identify ironic or sincere statements within short stories, was also administered; the design of the task allowed uniform implication of mentalizing across the conditions.

Results: Findings indicated that participants with MCI have second-order mentalizing difficulties compared to HC subjects. Moreover, MCI participants were impaired compared to the HC group in identifying ironic or sincere stories, both requiring mental inference capacities.

Conclusion: This study suggests that, in individuals with MCI, difficulties in the comprehension of ironic and sincere assertions are closely related to second-order mentalizing deficits. These findings support previous data suggesting a strong relationship between irony comprehension and mentalizing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus