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Elevated serum CA72-4 levels predict poor prognosis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma after intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

Liu P, Zhu Y, Liu L - Oncotarget (2015)

Bottom Line: Carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) is a human tumor-associated glycoprotein, commonly used as a tumor marker for diagnosing and predicting outcome in gastric and ovarian cancers.Multivariate analysis identified that Serum CA72-4 concentration was a significant prognostic factor (P<0.001).The hazard ratio (HR) of elevated serum CA72-4 levels compared with normal serum CA72-4 levels was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-3.73), after adjusted for gender and age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiotherapy, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

ABSTRACT
Carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) is a human tumor-associated glycoprotein, commonly used as a tumor marker for diagnosing and predicting outcome in gastric and ovarian cancers. However, the relationship between serum CA72-4 levels and prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma has not been fully elucidated. A total of 113 consecutive locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients who underwent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with or without chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. Serum CA72-4 levels were analyzed using immunoenzymometric assays. The association between serum CA72-4 levels and prognosis was evaluated. Serum CA72-4 levels was related with lymph node metastasis (P<0.001). The median overall survival time was 14.0 months for patients with serum CA72-4 normal levels and 10.0 months for the elevated levels (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis identified that Serum CA72-4 concentration was a significant prognostic factor (P<0.001). The hazard ratio (HR) of elevated serum CA72-4 levels compared with normal serum CA72-4 levels was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-3.73), after adjusted for gender and age. Based on this finding, Serum CA72-4 is a potential marker to predict lymph node metastasis and prognosis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overall survival curves with serum CA72-4 levels in the entire population (A), in female patients (B) and in male patients (C).
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Figure 1: Overall survival curves with serum CA72-4 levels in the entire population (A), in female patients (B) and in male patients (C).

Mentions: The 1 year, 2 year and 3 year cumulative overall survival (OS) rates were 42.4%, 13.8% and 5.7%, respectively. The median overall survival time was 14.0 months for patients with serum CA72-4 normal levels and 10.0 months for elevated levels. The 2 year overall survival rate was 19.6% for patients with serum CA72-4 normal levels and 0% for elevated levels, indicating a significantly worse prognosis in serum CA72-4 elevated levels (P<0.001, Figure 1A). The median overall survival time was shorter in patients with serum CA72-4 elevated levels than in those with normal levels in male pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients (8 months Vs 17 months, P<0.001, Figure 1B). However, in the population of female patients, there was no significant difference of median OS between those with serum CA72-4 normal levels (median OS=11 months) and those with serum CA72-4 elevated levels (median OS=11 months) (P=0.259) (Figure 1C). Two-year survival probability was 0% for serum CA72-4 elevated levels patients versus 18.8% for serum CA72-4 normal levels patients with age <65 years (P=0.004, Figure 2A). Similarly, patients with serum CA72-4 elevated levels had shorter OS than those with serum CA72-4 normal levels in the patients with age ≥65 years (median OS: 11.0 months Vs 18.0 months, P=0.034, Figure 2B). There was also significant difference of OS between serum CA72-4 normal levels patients and serum CA72-4 elevated levels patients among stage T1-2 (Median OS: 14.0 months Vs 5.0months, P=0.027, Figure 2C) and stage T3-4 (Median OS: 14.0 months Vs 11.0 months, P<0.001, Figure 2D). Furthermore, we examined the overall survival differences of patients stratified for normal CA72-4 levels and elevated CA72-4 levels according to regional lymph node metastasis. We found that for patients without lymph node metastasis, a highly significantly inferior outcome was observed in patients with elevated serum CA72-4 levels, compared with normal serum CA72-4 levels (median OS: 8 months Vs 12 months, P=0.001, Figure 3A). Also, there was significant difference in OS between patients with elevated serum CA72-4 levels and normal serum CA72-4 levels (median OS: 11 months Vs 17 months, P=0.001, Figure 3B) in the patients with positive lymph node metastasis. Elevated serum CA72-4 levels were also significantly associated with shorter OS for patients with chemotherapy (P=0.007, Figure 3C) and patients without chemotherapy (P=0.007, Figure 3D).


Elevated serum CA72-4 levels predict poor prognosis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma after intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

Liu P, Zhu Y, Liu L - Oncotarget (2015)

Overall survival curves with serum CA72-4 levels in the entire population (A), in female patients (B) and in male patients (C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496241&req=5

Figure 1: Overall survival curves with serum CA72-4 levels in the entire population (A), in female patients (B) and in male patients (C).
Mentions: The 1 year, 2 year and 3 year cumulative overall survival (OS) rates were 42.4%, 13.8% and 5.7%, respectively. The median overall survival time was 14.0 months for patients with serum CA72-4 normal levels and 10.0 months for elevated levels. The 2 year overall survival rate was 19.6% for patients with serum CA72-4 normal levels and 0% for elevated levels, indicating a significantly worse prognosis in serum CA72-4 elevated levels (P<0.001, Figure 1A). The median overall survival time was shorter in patients with serum CA72-4 elevated levels than in those with normal levels in male pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients (8 months Vs 17 months, P<0.001, Figure 1B). However, in the population of female patients, there was no significant difference of median OS between those with serum CA72-4 normal levels (median OS=11 months) and those with serum CA72-4 elevated levels (median OS=11 months) (P=0.259) (Figure 1C). Two-year survival probability was 0% for serum CA72-4 elevated levels patients versus 18.8% for serum CA72-4 normal levels patients with age <65 years (P=0.004, Figure 2A). Similarly, patients with serum CA72-4 elevated levels had shorter OS than those with serum CA72-4 normal levels in the patients with age ≥65 years (median OS: 11.0 months Vs 18.0 months, P=0.034, Figure 2B). There was also significant difference of OS between serum CA72-4 normal levels patients and serum CA72-4 elevated levels patients among stage T1-2 (Median OS: 14.0 months Vs 5.0months, P=0.027, Figure 2C) and stage T3-4 (Median OS: 14.0 months Vs 11.0 months, P<0.001, Figure 2D). Furthermore, we examined the overall survival differences of patients stratified for normal CA72-4 levels and elevated CA72-4 levels according to regional lymph node metastasis. We found that for patients without lymph node metastasis, a highly significantly inferior outcome was observed in patients with elevated serum CA72-4 levels, compared with normal serum CA72-4 levels (median OS: 8 months Vs 12 months, P=0.001, Figure 3A). Also, there was significant difference in OS between patients with elevated serum CA72-4 levels and normal serum CA72-4 levels (median OS: 11 months Vs 17 months, P=0.001, Figure 3B) in the patients with positive lymph node metastasis. Elevated serum CA72-4 levels were also significantly associated with shorter OS for patients with chemotherapy (P=0.007, Figure 3C) and patients without chemotherapy (P=0.007, Figure 3D).

Bottom Line: Carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) is a human tumor-associated glycoprotein, commonly used as a tumor marker for diagnosing and predicting outcome in gastric and ovarian cancers.Multivariate analysis identified that Serum CA72-4 concentration was a significant prognostic factor (P<0.001).The hazard ratio (HR) of elevated serum CA72-4 levels compared with normal serum CA72-4 levels was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-3.73), after adjusted for gender and age.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiotherapy, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

ABSTRACT
Carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA72-4) is a human tumor-associated glycoprotein, commonly used as a tumor marker for diagnosing and predicting outcome in gastric and ovarian cancers. However, the relationship between serum CA72-4 levels and prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma has not been fully elucidated. A total of 113 consecutive locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients who underwent intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with or without chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. Serum CA72-4 levels were analyzed using immunoenzymometric assays. The association between serum CA72-4 levels and prognosis was evaluated. Serum CA72-4 levels was related with lymph node metastasis (P<0.001). The median overall survival time was 14.0 months for patients with serum CA72-4 normal levels and 10.0 months for the elevated levels (P<0.001). Multivariate analysis identified that Serum CA72-4 concentration was a significant prognostic factor (P<0.001). The hazard ratio (HR) of elevated serum CA72-4 levels compared with normal serum CA72-4 levels was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.46-3.73), after adjusted for gender and age. Based on this finding, Serum CA72-4 is a potential marker to predict lymph node metastasis and prognosis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus