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Genetic characterization of breast cancer and implications for clinical management.

Geyer FC, Lopez-Garcia MA, Lambros MB, Reis-Filho JS - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2009)

Bottom Line: In the last few years, high-throughput microarray-based molecular analysis has provided increasingly more coherent information about the genetic aberrations in breast cancer.New biomarkers and molecular techniques are slowly becoming part of the diagnostic and prognostic armamentarium available for pathologists and oncologists to tailor the therapy for breast cancer patients.In this review, we will focus on the contribution of breast cancer somatic genetics to our understanding of breast cancer biology and its impact on breast cancer patient management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Pathology Laboratory, The Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Breast cancer is a genetic disease caused by the accumulation of mutations in neoplastic cells. In the last few years, high-throughput microarray-based molecular analysis has provided increasingly more coherent information about the genetic aberrations in breast cancer. New biomarkers and molecular techniques are slowly becoming part of the diagnostic and prognostic armamentarium available for pathologists and oncologists to tailor the therapy for breast cancer patients. In this review, we will focus on the contribution of breast cancer somatic genetics to our understanding of breast cancer biology and its impact on breast cancer patient management.

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Molecular subtypes of breast cancer. † Basal markers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Cytokeratins 5/6, 14 and 17; * Nottingham grading system; ° Most prevalent; Ck: cytokeratin; E-cad: E-cadherin; EMT: epithelial-mesenchymal transition; ER: oestrogen receptor; PR: progesterone receptor; AR: androgen receptor; IDC-NST: invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type.
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fig01: Molecular subtypes of breast cancer. † Basal markers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Cytokeratins 5/6, 14 and 17; * Nottingham grading system; ° Most prevalent; Ck: cytokeratin; E-cad: E-cadherin; EMT: epithelial-mesenchymal transition; ER: oestrogen receptor; PR: progesterone receptor; AR: androgen receptor; IDC-NST: invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type.

Mentions: Microarray-based gene expression profiling studies can be performed in multiple ways. One of the approaches, pioneered by the Stanford group [16, 17], focused on the use of unsupervised methods to test whether microarrays would provide biologically and/or clinically meaningful information about breast cancer diversity. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using an ‘intrinsic gene list’ led to the identification of five molecular groups according to their expression pattern, namely: luminal A, luminal B, HER2, basal-like and normal breast-like (Fig. 1).


Genetic characterization of breast cancer and implications for clinical management.

Geyer FC, Lopez-Garcia MA, Lambros MB, Reis-Filho JS - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2009)

Molecular subtypes of breast cancer. † Basal markers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Cytokeratins 5/6, 14 and 17; * Nottingham grading system; ° Most prevalent; Ck: cytokeratin; E-cad: E-cadherin; EMT: epithelial-mesenchymal transition; ER: oestrogen receptor; PR: progesterone receptor; AR: androgen receptor; IDC-NST: invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496116&req=5

fig01: Molecular subtypes of breast cancer. † Basal markers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Cytokeratins 5/6, 14 and 17; * Nottingham grading system; ° Most prevalent; Ck: cytokeratin; E-cad: E-cadherin; EMT: epithelial-mesenchymal transition; ER: oestrogen receptor; PR: progesterone receptor; AR: androgen receptor; IDC-NST: invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type.
Mentions: Microarray-based gene expression profiling studies can be performed in multiple ways. One of the approaches, pioneered by the Stanford group [16, 17], focused on the use of unsupervised methods to test whether microarrays would provide biologically and/or clinically meaningful information about breast cancer diversity. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using an ‘intrinsic gene list’ led to the identification of five molecular groups according to their expression pattern, namely: luminal A, luminal B, HER2, basal-like and normal breast-like (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: In the last few years, high-throughput microarray-based molecular analysis has provided increasingly more coherent information about the genetic aberrations in breast cancer.New biomarkers and molecular techniques are slowly becoming part of the diagnostic and prognostic armamentarium available for pathologists and oncologists to tailor the therapy for breast cancer patients.In this review, we will focus on the contribution of breast cancer somatic genetics to our understanding of breast cancer biology and its impact on breast cancer patient management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Pathology Laboratory, The Breakthrough Breast Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Breast cancer is a genetic disease caused by the accumulation of mutations in neoplastic cells. In the last few years, high-throughput microarray-based molecular analysis has provided increasingly more coherent information about the genetic aberrations in breast cancer. New biomarkers and molecular techniques are slowly becoming part of the diagnostic and prognostic armamentarium available for pathologists and oncologists to tailor the therapy for breast cancer patients. In this review, we will focus on the contribution of breast cancer somatic genetics to our understanding of breast cancer biology and its impact on breast cancer patient management.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus