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The Effects of Load Carriage and Physical Fatigue on Cognitive Performance.

Eddy MD, Hasselquist L, Giles G, Hayes JF, Howe J, Rourke J, Coyne M, O'Donovan M, Batty J, Brunyé TT, Mahoney CR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In the current study, ten participants walked for two hours while carrying no load or a 40 kg load.There were also shifts in response criterion towards responding yes and decreased sensitivity in responding in the loaded condition compared to the unloaded condition.In the visual target detection there were no reliable effects of load carriage in the overall analysis however, there were slower reaction times in the loaded compared to unloaded condition during the second hour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, United States of America; Department of Psychology, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In the current study, ten participants walked for two hours while carrying no load or a 40 kg load. During the second hour, treadmill grade was manipulated between a constant downhill or changing between flat, uphill, and downhill grades. Throughout the prolonged walk, participants performed two cognitive tasks, an auditory go no/go task and a visual target detection task. The main findings were that the number of false alarms increased over time in the loaded condition relative to the unloaded condition on the go no/go auditory task. There were also shifts in response criterion towards responding yes and decreased sensitivity in responding in the loaded condition compared to the unloaded condition. In the visual target detection there were no reliable effects of load carriage in the overall analysis however, there were slower reaction times in the loaded compared to unloaded condition during the second hour.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Means and Standard Errors of d’ scores over time collapsed across both load conditions (note: higher d’ scores = better performance).
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pone.0130817.g003: Means and Standard Errors of d’ scores over time collapsed across both load conditions (note: higher d’ scores = better performance).

Mentions: Participants had lower d’ scores in the loaded compared to unloaded condition, as indicated by a linear main effect of load, F(1,9) = 9.49, p = .013, ƞp2 = .513; Mloaded = 2.82, SDloaded = .52; Munloaded = 3.44, SDunloaded = .38. Regardless of load condition, performance decreased across the six time blocks, as indicated by a linear main effect of block, F(5,45) = 5.65, p < .001, ƞp2 = .386. Bonferroni corrected (critical p < .0033) pairwise comparisons revealed this main effect was driven by better performance at 25 minutes, M = 3.31, SD = .40, compared to at 65 minutes, M = 2.89, SD = .43, p = .001, see Fig 3. None of the other pairwise comparisons reached significance (all p’s > .0033). In addition, load and time block did not interact (F < 1.7, p > .17).


The Effects of Load Carriage and Physical Fatigue on Cognitive Performance.

Eddy MD, Hasselquist L, Giles G, Hayes JF, Howe J, Rourke J, Coyne M, O'Donovan M, Batty J, Brunyé TT, Mahoney CR - PLoS ONE (2015)

Means and Standard Errors of d’ scores over time collapsed across both load conditions (note: higher d’ scores = better performance).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496096&req=5

pone.0130817.g003: Means and Standard Errors of d’ scores over time collapsed across both load conditions (note: higher d’ scores = better performance).
Mentions: Participants had lower d’ scores in the loaded compared to unloaded condition, as indicated by a linear main effect of load, F(1,9) = 9.49, p = .013, ƞp2 = .513; Mloaded = 2.82, SDloaded = .52; Munloaded = 3.44, SDunloaded = .38. Regardless of load condition, performance decreased across the six time blocks, as indicated by a linear main effect of block, F(5,45) = 5.65, p < .001, ƞp2 = .386. Bonferroni corrected (critical p < .0033) pairwise comparisons revealed this main effect was driven by better performance at 25 minutes, M = 3.31, SD = .40, compared to at 65 minutes, M = 2.89, SD = .43, p = .001, see Fig 3. None of the other pairwise comparisons reached significance (all p’s > .0033). In addition, load and time block did not interact (F < 1.7, p > .17).

Bottom Line: In the current study, ten participants walked for two hours while carrying no load or a 40 kg load.There were also shifts in response criterion towards responding yes and decreased sensitivity in responding in the loaded condition compared to the unloaded condition.In the visual target detection there were no reliable effects of load carriage in the overall analysis however, there were slower reaction times in the loaded compared to unloaded condition during the second hour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Natick, Massachusetts, United States of America; Department of Psychology, Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
In the current study, ten participants walked for two hours while carrying no load or a 40 kg load. During the second hour, treadmill grade was manipulated between a constant downhill or changing between flat, uphill, and downhill grades. Throughout the prolonged walk, participants performed two cognitive tasks, an auditory go no/go task and a visual target detection task. The main findings were that the number of false alarms increased over time in the loaded condition relative to the unloaded condition on the go no/go auditory task. There were also shifts in response criterion towards responding yes and decreased sensitivity in responding in the loaded condition compared to the unloaded condition. In the visual target detection there were no reliable effects of load carriage in the overall analysis however, there were slower reaction times in the loaded compared to unloaded condition during the second hour.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus