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Face-n-Food: Gender Differences in Tuning to Faces.

Pavlova MA, Scheffler K, Sokolov AN - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions.However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces.As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Medical School, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Faces represent valuable signals for social cognition and non-verbal communication. A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions. However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces. We presented healthy adult females and males with a set of newly created food-plate images resembling faces (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Females not only more readily recognized the images as a face (they reported resembling a face on images, on which males still did not), but gave on overall more face responses. The findings are discussed in the light of gender differences in deficient face perception. As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proportion of face responses to each image in the Face-n-Food task for female and male participants.The image number reflects its recognizability as a face (1—the least recognizable, 10—the most recognizable). Fitted trend curves represent moving average of face response proportion across the images. Females not only earlier report seeing a face and give on overall more face responses, but also faster reach a ceiling level of performance.
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pone.0130363.g004: Proportion of face responses to each image in the Face-n-Food task for female and male participants.The image number reflects its recognizability as a face (1—the least recognizable, 10—the most recognizable). Fitted trend curves represent moving average of face response proportion across the images. Females not only earlier report seeing a face and give on overall more face responses, but also faster reach a ceiling level of performance.

Mentions: Fig 4 represents the proportion of face responses for each Face-n-Food image for females and males. As seen from this figure, females not only earlier report seeing a face, give more face responses, but also faster than males reach a ceiling level of performance giving the maximal number of face responses. This is confirmed by statistical analysis performed on individual frequencies of face responses as dependent measure and images used. The analysis reveals a highly significant effect of gender (χ2 (1; 64) = 52.45, p < 0.0001). The gender by image interaction (χ2 (1; 64) = 14.01, p < 0.0002) is also highly significant indicating that the slope of the fitted curves for females is much steeper than for males.


Face-n-Food: Gender Differences in Tuning to Faces.

Pavlova MA, Scheffler K, Sokolov AN - PLoS ONE (2015)

Proportion of face responses to each image in the Face-n-Food task for female and male participants.The image number reflects its recognizability as a face (1—the least recognizable, 10—the most recognizable). Fitted trend curves represent moving average of face response proportion across the images. Females not only earlier report seeing a face and give on overall more face responses, but also faster reach a ceiling level of performance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496088&req=5

pone.0130363.g004: Proportion of face responses to each image in the Face-n-Food task for female and male participants.The image number reflects its recognizability as a face (1—the least recognizable, 10—the most recognizable). Fitted trend curves represent moving average of face response proportion across the images. Females not only earlier report seeing a face and give on overall more face responses, but also faster reach a ceiling level of performance.
Mentions: Fig 4 represents the proportion of face responses for each Face-n-Food image for females and males. As seen from this figure, females not only earlier report seeing a face, give more face responses, but also faster than males reach a ceiling level of performance giving the maximal number of face responses. This is confirmed by statistical analysis performed on individual frequencies of face responses as dependent measure and images used. The analysis reveals a highly significant effect of gender (χ2 (1; 64) = 52.45, p < 0.0001). The gender by image interaction (χ2 (1; 64) = 14.01, p < 0.0002) is also highly significant indicating that the slope of the fitted curves for females is much steeper than for males.

Bottom Line: A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions.However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces.As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Medical School, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Faces represent valuable signals for social cognition and non-verbal communication. A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions. However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces. We presented healthy adult females and males with a set of newly created food-plate images resembling faces (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Females not only more readily recognized the images as a face (they reported resembling a face on images, on which males still did not), but gave on overall more face responses. The findings are discussed in the light of gender differences in deficient face perception. As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus