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Face-n-Food: Gender Differences in Tuning to Faces.

Pavlova MA, Scheffler K, Sokolov AN - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions.However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces.As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Medical School, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Faces represent valuable signals for social cognition and non-verbal communication. A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions. However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces. We presented healthy adult females and males with a set of newly created food-plate images resembling faces (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Females not only more readily recognized the images as a face (they reported resembling a face on images, on which males still did not), but gave on overall more face responses. The findings are discussed in the light of gender differences in deficient face perception. As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style.Left: “Reversible Head with Basket of Fruit” painting by Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1526–1593), an Italian painter best known for creating fascinating imaginative portraits composed entirely of fruits, vegetables, plants and flowers (image source Artdaily.org; public domain). Right: The portrait of one of the authors of this paper (ANS) created by another author (MAP) in a manner slightly bordering on the style of Giuseppe Arcimboldo.
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pone.0130363.g001: Examples of the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style.Left: “Reversible Head with Basket of Fruit” painting by Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1526–1593), an Italian painter best known for creating fascinating imaginative portraits composed entirely of fruits, vegetables, plants and flowers (image source Artdaily.org; public domain). Right: The portrait of one of the authors of this paper (ANS) created by another author (MAP) in a manner slightly bordering on the style of Giuseppe Arcimboldo.

Mentions: The present study is aimed at investigation of gender differences in tuning to faces. For this purpose, a new Face-n-Food task has been created. We presented healthy adult females and males with a set of food-plate images composed of food ingredients (fruits, vegetables, sausages, etc.) in a manner slightly bordering on the style of Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1526–1593), an Italian painter best known for creating fascinating imaginative portraits composed entirely of fruits, vegetables, plants and flowers (Fig 1). It appears that typically developing adults and children have an entire bias for seeing faces and their spontaneous and effortless recognition in the Arcimboldo-like images. In other words, healthy individuals are well tuned to faces in such images.


Face-n-Food: Gender Differences in Tuning to Faces.

Pavlova MA, Scheffler K, Sokolov AN - PLoS ONE (2015)

Examples of the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style.Left: “Reversible Head with Basket of Fruit” painting by Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1526–1593), an Italian painter best known for creating fascinating imaginative portraits composed entirely of fruits, vegetables, plants and flowers (image source Artdaily.org; public domain). Right: The portrait of one of the authors of this paper (ANS) created by another author (MAP) in a manner slightly bordering on the style of Giuseppe Arcimboldo.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496088&req=5

pone.0130363.g001: Examples of the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style.Left: “Reversible Head with Basket of Fruit” painting by Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1526–1593), an Italian painter best known for creating fascinating imaginative portraits composed entirely of fruits, vegetables, plants and flowers (image source Artdaily.org; public domain). Right: The portrait of one of the authors of this paper (ANS) created by another author (MAP) in a manner slightly bordering on the style of Giuseppe Arcimboldo.
Mentions: The present study is aimed at investigation of gender differences in tuning to faces. For this purpose, a new Face-n-Food task has been created. We presented healthy adult females and males with a set of food-plate images composed of food ingredients (fruits, vegetables, sausages, etc.) in a manner slightly bordering on the style of Giuseppe Arcimboldo (1526–1593), an Italian painter best known for creating fascinating imaginative portraits composed entirely of fruits, vegetables, plants and flowers (Fig 1). It appears that typically developing adults and children have an entire bias for seeing faces and their spontaneous and effortless recognition in the Arcimboldo-like images. In other words, healthy individuals are well tuned to faces in such images.

Bottom Line: A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions.However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces.As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Medical School, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Faces represent valuable signals for social cognition and non-verbal communication. A wealth of research indicates that women tend to excel in recognition of facial expressions. However, it remains unclear whether females are better tuned to faces. We presented healthy adult females and males with a set of newly created food-plate images resembling faces (slightly bordering on the Giuseppe Arcimboldo style). In a spontaneous recognition task, participants were shown a set of images in a predetermined order from the least to most resembling a face. Females not only more readily recognized the images as a face (they reported resembling a face on images, on which males still did not), but gave on overall more face responses. The findings are discussed in the light of gender differences in deficient face perception. As most neuropsychiatric, neurodevelopmental and psychosomatic disorders characterized by social brain abnormalities are sex specific, the task may serve as a valuable tool for uncovering impairments in visual face processing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus