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Noninvasive In-Vivo Quantification of Mechanical Heterogeneity of Invasive Breast Carcinomas.

Liu T, Babaniyi OA, Hall TJ, Barbone PE, Oberai AA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study we seek to quantify the mechanical heterogeneity within malignant and benign tumors using ultrasound based elasticity imaging.By creating in-vivo elastic modulus images for ten human subjects with breast tumors, we show that Young's modulus distribution in cancerous breast tumors is more heterogeneous when compared with tumors that are not malignant, and that this signature may be used to distinguish malignant breast tumors.Our results complement the view of cancer as a heterogeneous disease on multiple length scales by demonstrating that mechanical properties within cancerous tumors are also spatially heterogeneous.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scientific Computation Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Heterogeneity is a hallmark of cancer whether one considers the genotype of cancerous cells, the composition of their microenvironment, the distribution of blood and lymphatic microvasculature, or the spatial distribution of the desmoplastic reaction. It is logical to expect that this heterogeneity in tumor microenvironment will lead to spatial heterogeneity in its mechanical properties. In this study we seek to quantify the mechanical heterogeneity within malignant and benign tumors using ultrasound based elasticity imaging. By creating in-vivo elastic modulus images for ten human subjects with breast tumors, we show that Young's modulus distribution in cancerous breast tumors is more heterogeneous when compared with tumors that are not malignant, and that this signature may be used to distinguish malignant breast tumors. Our results complement the view of cancer as a heterogeneous disease on multiple length scales by demonstrating that mechanical properties within cancerous tumors are also spatially heterogeneous.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Value of the heterogeneity parameter for the five invasive ductal carcinomas (represented by red squares) and fibroadenomas (represented by green circles).The average value for the IDCs is 2.13 and the average value for the FAs is 1.76. Using H > 1.8 as a criterion for malignancy yields 90% diagnostic accuracy.
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pone.0130258.g005: Value of the heterogeneity parameter for the five invasive ductal carcinomas (represented by red squares) and fibroadenomas (represented by green circles).The average value for the IDCs is 2.13 and the average value for the FAs is 1.76. Using H > 1.8 as a criterion for malignancy yields 90% diagnostic accuracy.

Mentions: The value of this parameter for the five FAs and IDCs is presented in Fig 5. We note that when compared to the FAs, the value of H for the IDCs is large. This implies that heterogeneity at this scale is not generically associated with tissue stiffening, but is specific to malignancy. The value of H for benign lesions was 1.765 ± 0.420, and for malignant lesions it was 2.130 ± 0.285 (Mean ± standard deviation). The difference in the value of H between benign and malignant lesions was 0.365 with a 95% confidence interval of [-0.057, 0.788]. Since this interval includes zero, these results would not be considered statistically significant, even though the lower limit is quite close to zero. We attribute this to the one outlying fibroadenoma that has a large value of H (= 2.572). If this sample is removed from our set, then the average value of H for benign lesions becomes 1.563 ± 0.132 (Mean ± standard deviation), and the difference in the average value of H between benign and malignant lesions is 0.567 with a 95% confidence interval of [0.299, 0.835]. This result would be considered statistically significant. This sensitivity to the inclusion (or exclusion) of a single sample illustrates that though our results are promising, they need to be tested on a larger sample set in order to be considered statistically significant. If we use the value of H = 1.8 as a threshold of malignancy we could correctly classify 9 out of 10 lesions. These numbers compare favorably with the current diagnostic performance of mammography in conjunction with ultrasound [19].


Noninvasive In-Vivo Quantification of Mechanical Heterogeneity of Invasive Breast Carcinomas.

Liu T, Babaniyi OA, Hall TJ, Barbone PE, Oberai AA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Value of the heterogeneity parameter for the five invasive ductal carcinomas (represented by red squares) and fibroadenomas (represented by green circles).The average value for the IDCs is 2.13 and the average value for the FAs is 1.76. Using H > 1.8 as a criterion for malignancy yields 90% diagnostic accuracy.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496079&req=5

pone.0130258.g005: Value of the heterogeneity parameter for the five invasive ductal carcinomas (represented by red squares) and fibroadenomas (represented by green circles).The average value for the IDCs is 2.13 and the average value for the FAs is 1.76. Using H > 1.8 as a criterion for malignancy yields 90% diagnostic accuracy.
Mentions: The value of this parameter for the five FAs and IDCs is presented in Fig 5. We note that when compared to the FAs, the value of H for the IDCs is large. This implies that heterogeneity at this scale is not generically associated with tissue stiffening, but is specific to malignancy. The value of H for benign lesions was 1.765 ± 0.420, and for malignant lesions it was 2.130 ± 0.285 (Mean ± standard deviation). The difference in the value of H between benign and malignant lesions was 0.365 with a 95% confidence interval of [-0.057, 0.788]. Since this interval includes zero, these results would not be considered statistically significant, even though the lower limit is quite close to zero. We attribute this to the one outlying fibroadenoma that has a large value of H (= 2.572). If this sample is removed from our set, then the average value of H for benign lesions becomes 1.563 ± 0.132 (Mean ± standard deviation), and the difference in the average value of H between benign and malignant lesions is 0.567 with a 95% confidence interval of [0.299, 0.835]. This result would be considered statistically significant. This sensitivity to the inclusion (or exclusion) of a single sample illustrates that though our results are promising, they need to be tested on a larger sample set in order to be considered statistically significant. If we use the value of H = 1.8 as a threshold of malignancy we could correctly classify 9 out of 10 lesions. These numbers compare favorably with the current diagnostic performance of mammography in conjunction with ultrasound [19].

Bottom Line: In this study we seek to quantify the mechanical heterogeneity within malignant and benign tumors using ultrasound based elasticity imaging.By creating in-vivo elastic modulus images for ten human subjects with breast tumors, we show that Young's modulus distribution in cancerous breast tumors is more heterogeneous when compared with tumors that are not malignant, and that this signature may be used to distinguish malignant breast tumors.Our results complement the view of cancer as a heterogeneous disease on multiple length scales by demonstrating that mechanical properties within cancerous tumors are also spatially heterogeneous.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scientific Computation Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Heterogeneity is a hallmark of cancer whether one considers the genotype of cancerous cells, the composition of their microenvironment, the distribution of blood and lymphatic microvasculature, or the spatial distribution of the desmoplastic reaction. It is logical to expect that this heterogeneity in tumor microenvironment will lead to spatial heterogeneity in its mechanical properties. In this study we seek to quantify the mechanical heterogeneity within malignant and benign tumors using ultrasound based elasticity imaging. By creating in-vivo elastic modulus images for ten human subjects with breast tumors, we show that Young's modulus distribution in cancerous breast tumors is more heterogeneous when compared with tumors that are not malignant, and that this signature may be used to distinguish malignant breast tumors. Our results complement the view of cancer as a heterogeneous disease on multiple length scales by demonstrating that mechanical properties within cancerous tumors are also spatially heterogeneous.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus