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Noninvasive In-Vivo Quantification of Mechanical Heterogeneity of Invasive Breast Carcinomas.

Liu T, Babaniyi OA, Hall TJ, Barbone PE, Oberai AA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study we seek to quantify the mechanical heterogeneity within malignant and benign tumors using ultrasound based elasticity imaging.By creating in-vivo elastic modulus images for ten human subjects with breast tumors, we show that Young's modulus distribution in cancerous breast tumors is more heterogeneous when compared with tumors that are not malignant, and that this signature may be used to distinguish malignant breast tumors.Our results complement the view of cancer as a heterogeneous disease on multiple length scales by demonstrating that mechanical properties within cancerous tumors are also spatially heterogeneous.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scientific Computation Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Heterogeneity is a hallmark of cancer whether one considers the genotype of cancerous cells, the composition of their microenvironment, the distribution of blood and lymphatic microvasculature, or the spatial distribution of the desmoplastic reaction. It is logical to expect that this heterogeneity in tumor microenvironment will lead to spatial heterogeneity in its mechanical properties. In this study we seek to quantify the mechanical heterogeneity within malignant and benign tumors using ultrasound based elasticity imaging. By creating in-vivo elastic modulus images for ten human subjects with breast tumors, we show that Young's modulus distribution in cancerous breast tumors is more heterogeneous when compared with tumors that are not malignant, and that this signature may be used to distinguish malignant breast tumors. Our results complement the view of cancer as a heterogeneous disease on multiple length scales by demonstrating that mechanical properties within cancerous tumors are also spatially heterogeneous.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) and (C): B-mode ultrasound images of two typical invasive ductal carcinomas. (B) and (D): Corresponding Young’s modulus images generated using elasticity imaging. The tumor boundary is represented by a black curve that is drawn using 50 peak tumor modulus value. The modulus distribution within the tumors is heterogeneous and the margins of the tumors are rough.
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pone.0130258.g004: (A) and (C): B-mode ultrasound images of two typical invasive ductal carcinomas. (B) and (D): Corresponding Young’s modulus images generated using elasticity imaging. The tumor boundary is represented by a black curve that is drawn using 50 peak tumor modulus value. The modulus distribution within the tumors is heterogeneous and the margins of the tumors are rough.

Mentions: The results for the distribution of the Young’s modulus are shown in Fig 3 for two typical fibroadenomas (FAs) and in Fig 4 for two typical invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs). In these figures we have also shown the corresponding B-mode ultrasound images. First, we note that all the tumors are observed more clearly in the modulus images, where they stand out as regions of elevated stiffness. We also observe that modulus distribution within the cancerous tumors (IDCs) and the surrounding tissue is more heterogeneous when compared to benign tumors (FAs). Finally, we observe that the cancerous tumors display multiple foci of stiffness interspersed with softer regions.


Noninvasive In-Vivo Quantification of Mechanical Heterogeneity of Invasive Breast Carcinomas.

Liu T, Babaniyi OA, Hall TJ, Barbone PE, Oberai AA - PLoS ONE (2015)

(A) and (C): B-mode ultrasound images of two typical invasive ductal carcinomas. (B) and (D): Corresponding Young’s modulus images generated using elasticity imaging. The tumor boundary is represented by a black curve that is drawn using 50 peak tumor modulus value. The modulus distribution within the tumors is heterogeneous and the margins of the tumors are rough.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496079&req=5

pone.0130258.g004: (A) and (C): B-mode ultrasound images of two typical invasive ductal carcinomas. (B) and (D): Corresponding Young’s modulus images generated using elasticity imaging. The tumor boundary is represented by a black curve that is drawn using 50 peak tumor modulus value. The modulus distribution within the tumors is heterogeneous and the margins of the tumors are rough.
Mentions: The results for the distribution of the Young’s modulus are shown in Fig 3 for two typical fibroadenomas (FAs) and in Fig 4 for two typical invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs). In these figures we have also shown the corresponding B-mode ultrasound images. First, we note that all the tumors are observed more clearly in the modulus images, where they stand out as regions of elevated stiffness. We also observe that modulus distribution within the cancerous tumors (IDCs) and the surrounding tissue is more heterogeneous when compared to benign tumors (FAs). Finally, we observe that the cancerous tumors display multiple foci of stiffness interspersed with softer regions.

Bottom Line: In this study we seek to quantify the mechanical heterogeneity within malignant and benign tumors using ultrasound based elasticity imaging.By creating in-vivo elastic modulus images for ten human subjects with breast tumors, we show that Young's modulus distribution in cancerous breast tumors is more heterogeneous when compared with tumors that are not malignant, and that this signature may be used to distinguish malignant breast tumors.Our results complement the view of cancer as a heterogeneous disease on multiple length scales by demonstrating that mechanical properties within cancerous tumors are also spatially heterogeneous.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scientific Computation Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT
Heterogeneity is a hallmark of cancer whether one considers the genotype of cancerous cells, the composition of their microenvironment, the distribution of blood and lymphatic microvasculature, or the spatial distribution of the desmoplastic reaction. It is logical to expect that this heterogeneity in tumor microenvironment will lead to spatial heterogeneity in its mechanical properties. In this study we seek to quantify the mechanical heterogeneity within malignant and benign tumors using ultrasound based elasticity imaging. By creating in-vivo elastic modulus images for ten human subjects with breast tumors, we show that Young's modulus distribution in cancerous breast tumors is more heterogeneous when compared with tumors that are not malignant, and that this signature may be used to distinguish malignant breast tumors. Our results complement the view of cancer as a heterogeneous disease on multiple length scales by demonstrating that mechanical properties within cancerous tumors are also spatially heterogeneous.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus