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A New Look at Shelter 131/51 in the Natufian Site of Eynan (Ain-Mallaha), Israel.

Haklay G, Gopher A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A new look at the architectural remains and the stratigraphy resulted in an alternative reconstruction, essentially different than the one we have come to know.We used spatial (architectural-geometrical) analysis in order to study the relationships between the different architectural elements and to test our hypothesis that the series of postholes may have not pertained to the upper floor 131 of Layer IV as suggested by Perrot and Valla, but rather to the successive occupational and architectural episode.The association of the postholes with Wall 51 of Layer III sheds new light on the architectural remains revealing their geometric design, an important characteristic of Early Natufian Architecture, the meaning and implications of which we shortly discuss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sonia and Marco Nadler Institute of Archaeology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

ABSTRACT
In the past 25 years since the reconstruction of Shelter 131 of Eynan was suggested by Francois Valla, its image has become almost iconic--a highly cited symbol of early sedentism constituting a significant part of our knowledge on early stone constructions and the people behind them. A new look at the architectural remains and the stratigraphy resulted in an alternative reconstruction, essentially different than the one we have come to know. We used spatial (architectural-geometrical) analysis in order to study the relationships between the different architectural elements and to test our hypothesis that the series of postholes may have not pertained to the upper floor 131 of Layer IV as suggested by Perrot and Valla, but rather to the successive occupational and architectural episode. The association of the postholes with Wall 51 of Layer III sheds new light on the architectural remains revealing their geometric design, an important characteristic of Early Natufian Architecture, the meaning and implications of which we shortly discuss.

No MeSH data available.


Architectural-geometrical analysis and results.
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pone.0130121.g004: Architectural-geometrical analysis and results.

Mentions: The analysis was made on drawings after Jean Perrot [3, 10, 11, 17, 18]. Each curved wall was represented by a set of points, evenly spaced at an interval of 60cm along the line drawing that marks the wall's inner bottom edge (Fig 4). An algorithm that searches for a statistical center point in which the standard distance deviation to the given points is minimal (S2 Fig) was applied separately to each structure and to the arch of six postholes marked by their centers (Fig 5). This statistical method compensates for the roughness of the undressed stones and for minute survey and drawing inaccuracies. The resulted center points can be considered a property of the structures and were most probably spatially perceived by the builders and users of each structure. The analysis of the statistical centers yielded a common point (in a precision of 1cm) as the approximate center of Wall 51 and of the series of postholes, while the other two centers of Wall 131 and Wall 62 were located 60cm to the south and 65cm to the north of that location (Fig 4).


A New Look at Shelter 131/51 in the Natufian Site of Eynan (Ain-Mallaha), Israel.

Haklay G, Gopher A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Architectural-geometrical analysis and results.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496039&req=5

pone.0130121.g004: Architectural-geometrical analysis and results.
Mentions: The analysis was made on drawings after Jean Perrot [3, 10, 11, 17, 18]. Each curved wall was represented by a set of points, evenly spaced at an interval of 60cm along the line drawing that marks the wall's inner bottom edge (Fig 4). An algorithm that searches for a statistical center point in which the standard distance deviation to the given points is minimal (S2 Fig) was applied separately to each structure and to the arch of six postholes marked by their centers (Fig 5). This statistical method compensates for the roughness of the undressed stones and for minute survey and drawing inaccuracies. The resulted center points can be considered a property of the structures and were most probably spatially perceived by the builders and users of each structure. The analysis of the statistical centers yielded a common point (in a precision of 1cm) as the approximate center of Wall 51 and of the series of postholes, while the other two centers of Wall 131 and Wall 62 were located 60cm to the south and 65cm to the north of that location (Fig 4).

Bottom Line: A new look at the architectural remains and the stratigraphy resulted in an alternative reconstruction, essentially different than the one we have come to know.We used spatial (architectural-geometrical) analysis in order to study the relationships between the different architectural elements and to test our hypothesis that the series of postholes may have not pertained to the upper floor 131 of Layer IV as suggested by Perrot and Valla, but rather to the successive occupational and architectural episode.The association of the postholes with Wall 51 of Layer III sheds new light on the architectural remains revealing their geometric design, an important characteristic of Early Natufian Architecture, the meaning and implications of which we shortly discuss.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sonia and Marco Nadler Institute of Archaeology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

ABSTRACT
In the past 25 years since the reconstruction of Shelter 131 of Eynan was suggested by Francois Valla, its image has become almost iconic--a highly cited symbol of early sedentism constituting a significant part of our knowledge on early stone constructions and the people behind them. A new look at the architectural remains and the stratigraphy resulted in an alternative reconstruction, essentially different than the one we have come to know. We used spatial (architectural-geometrical) analysis in order to study the relationships between the different architectural elements and to test our hypothesis that the series of postholes may have not pertained to the upper floor 131 of Layer IV as suggested by Perrot and Valla, but rather to the successive occupational and architectural episode. The association of the postholes with Wall 51 of Layer III sheds new light on the architectural remains revealing their geometric design, an important characteristic of Early Natufian Architecture, the meaning and implications of which we shortly discuss.

No MeSH data available.