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On Public Influence on People's Interactions with Ordinary Biodiversity.

Skandrani Z, Daniel L, Jacquelin L, Leboucher G, Bovet D, Prévot AC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that most people (mean: 81%) do not interact with pigeons.We discuss these results in terms of public normative pressures on city dwellers' access to and reconnection with urban nature.We call for caution in how urban species are publically portrayed and managed, given the importance of interactions with ordinary biodiversity for the fate of nature conservation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre d'Ecologie et des Sciences de la Conservation (CESCO UMR7204), Sorbonne Universités, MNHN, CNRS, UPMC, CP51, Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
Besides direct impacts of urban biodiversity on local ecosystem services, the contact of city dwellers with urban nature in their everyday life could increase their awareness on conservation issues. In this paper, we focused on a particularly common animal urban species, the feral pigeon Columba livia. Through an observational approach, we examined behavioral interactions between city dwellers and this species in the Paris metropolis, France. We found that most people (mean: 81%) do not interact with pigeons. Further, interactions (either positive or negative) are context and age-dependent: children interact more than adults and the elderly, while people in tourist spots interact more than people in urban parks or in railway stations, a result that suggests that people interacting with pigeons are mostly tourists. We discuss these results in terms of public normative pressures on city dwellers' access to and reconnection with urban nature. We call for caution in how urban species are publically portrayed and managed, given the importance of interactions with ordinary biodiversity for the fate of nature conservation.

No MeSH data available.


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Proportions of interactive behaviours towards pigeons for three categories of urban places.
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pone.0130215.g002: Proportions of interactive behaviours towards pigeons for three categories of urban places.

Mentions: In more details, the proportion of interactive behaviors towards pigeons did vary between age categories, genders and locations (Table 2). If elderly people were significantly more neutral towards pigeons than adults (P = 0.001, Table 3), children were much more interactive towards pigeons than both adults (P<10−10, Table 3) and elderly people (Fig 1). According to gender, men and women did not differ in their neutrality towards pigeons except for children: boys were significantly less neutral than girls (P<10−6, Table 3). Finally, according to locations, the proportion of neutral behavior was significantly lower in the tourist spots than in either railway stations or urban parks (P<10−8, Table 3, Fig 2).


On Public Influence on People's Interactions with Ordinary Biodiversity.

Skandrani Z, Daniel L, Jacquelin L, Leboucher G, Bovet D, Prévot AC - PLoS ONE (2015)

Proportions of interactive behaviours towards pigeons for three categories of urban places.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495921&req=5

pone.0130215.g002: Proportions of interactive behaviours towards pigeons for three categories of urban places.
Mentions: In more details, the proportion of interactive behaviors towards pigeons did vary between age categories, genders and locations (Table 2). If elderly people were significantly more neutral towards pigeons than adults (P = 0.001, Table 3), children were much more interactive towards pigeons than both adults (P<10−10, Table 3) and elderly people (Fig 1). According to gender, men and women did not differ in their neutrality towards pigeons except for children: boys were significantly less neutral than girls (P<10−6, Table 3). Finally, according to locations, the proportion of neutral behavior was significantly lower in the tourist spots than in either railway stations or urban parks (P<10−8, Table 3, Fig 2).

Bottom Line: We found that most people (mean: 81%) do not interact with pigeons.We discuss these results in terms of public normative pressures on city dwellers' access to and reconnection with urban nature.We call for caution in how urban species are publically portrayed and managed, given the importance of interactions with ordinary biodiversity for the fate of nature conservation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre d'Ecologie et des Sciences de la Conservation (CESCO UMR7204), Sorbonne Universités, MNHN, CNRS, UPMC, CP51, Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
Besides direct impacts of urban biodiversity on local ecosystem services, the contact of city dwellers with urban nature in their everyday life could increase their awareness on conservation issues. In this paper, we focused on a particularly common animal urban species, the feral pigeon Columba livia. Through an observational approach, we examined behavioral interactions between city dwellers and this species in the Paris metropolis, France. We found that most people (mean: 81%) do not interact with pigeons. Further, interactions (either positive or negative) are context and age-dependent: children interact more than adults and the elderly, while people in tourist spots interact more than people in urban parks or in railway stations, a result that suggests that people interacting with pigeons are mostly tourists. We discuss these results in terms of public normative pressures on city dwellers' access to and reconnection with urban nature. We call for caution in how urban species are publically portrayed and managed, given the importance of interactions with ordinary biodiversity for the fate of nature conservation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus