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Prevalence, correlates, and prospective predictors of non-suicidal self-injury among New Zealand adolescents: cross-sectional and longitudinal survey data.

Garisch JA, Wilson MS - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Lifetime history of NSSI was 48.7 % (females 49.4 %, males 48 %).Consistent with previous international research, NSSI was associated with higher Alexithymia, depression, anxiety, bullying, impulsivity, substance abuse, abuse history and sexuality concerns and lower mindfulness, resilience and self-esteem.Cross-lag correlations suggested NSSI is directly (perhaps causally) related to psychological vulnerability in various domains (e.g., increased depression and lower self-esteem), while bullying may be more distal to NSSI, rather than a proximal predictor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600 Kelburn Parade, Wellington, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is common among adolescents and linked to many maladaptive outcomes. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of NSSI among a community sample of New Zealand adolescents. A self-report questionnaire was administered to adolescents at time 1 (N = 1162, mean age = 16.35), and approximately five months later (time 2, N = 830, mean age = 16.49). Prevalence and bivariate correlations were assessed at both time points, and cross-lag correlations using matched data (N = 495, mean age = 16.23). Lifetime history of NSSI was 48.7 % (females 49.4 %, males 48 %). Consistent with previous international research, NSSI was associated with higher Alexithymia, depression, anxiety, bullying, impulsivity, substance abuse, abuse history and sexuality concerns and lower mindfulness, resilience and self-esteem. Cross-lag correlations suggested NSSI is directly (perhaps causally) related to psychological vulnerability in various domains (e.g., increased depression and lower self-esteem), while bullying may be more distal to NSSI, rather than a proximal predictor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cross-lagged panel correlations of non-suicidal self-injury and behavioural/contextual factors across time 1 and time 2
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig3: Cross-lagged panel correlations of non-suicidal self-injury and behavioural/contextual factors across time 1 and time 2

Mentions: Figure 1 represents the cross-lagged panel correlations of NSSI and risk factors, while Figs. 2 and 3 show the results for NSSI and protective factors and behavioural/contextual factors respectively (standardised coefficients are shown).Fig. 1


Prevalence, correlates, and prospective predictors of non-suicidal self-injury among New Zealand adolescents: cross-sectional and longitudinal survey data.

Garisch JA, Wilson MS - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2015)

Cross-lagged panel correlations of non-suicidal self-injury and behavioural/contextual factors across time 1 and time 2
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495816&req=5

Fig3: Cross-lagged panel correlations of non-suicidal self-injury and behavioural/contextual factors across time 1 and time 2
Mentions: Figure 1 represents the cross-lagged panel correlations of NSSI and risk factors, while Figs. 2 and 3 show the results for NSSI and protective factors and behavioural/contextual factors respectively (standardised coefficients are shown).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Lifetime history of NSSI was 48.7 % (females 49.4 %, males 48 %).Consistent with previous international research, NSSI was associated with higher Alexithymia, depression, anxiety, bullying, impulsivity, substance abuse, abuse history and sexuality concerns and lower mindfulness, resilience and self-esteem.Cross-lag correlations suggested NSSI is directly (perhaps causally) related to psychological vulnerability in various domains (e.g., increased depression and lower self-esteem), while bullying may be more distal to NSSI, rather than a proximal predictor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600 Kelburn Parade, Wellington, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT
Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is common among adolescents and linked to many maladaptive outcomes. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of NSSI among a community sample of New Zealand adolescents. A self-report questionnaire was administered to adolescents at time 1 (N = 1162, mean age = 16.35), and approximately five months later (time 2, N = 830, mean age = 16.49). Prevalence and bivariate correlations were assessed at both time points, and cross-lag correlations using matched data (N = 495, mean age = 16.23). Lifetime history of NSSI was 48.7 % (females 49.4 %, males 48 %). Consistent with previous international research, NSSI was associated with higher Alexithymia, depression, anxiety, bullying, impulsivity, substance abuse, abuse history and sexuality concerns and lower mindfulness, resilience and self-esteem. Cross-lag correlations suggested NSSI is directly (perhaps causally) related to psychological vulnerability in various domains (e.g., increased depression and lower self-esteem), while bullying may be more distal to NSSI, rather than a proximal predictor.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus