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The results of surgical treatment for pronation deformities of the forearm in cerebral palsy after a mean follow-up of 17.5 years.

Čobeljić G, Rajković S, Bajin Z, Lešić A, Bumbaširević M, Aleksić M, Atkinson HD - J Orthop Surg Res (2015)

Bottom Line: All three procedures led to significantly improved ranges of motion and upper limb function, with good/excellent results in 80 % of patients.There were no statistically significant differences in outcomes between different ages groups, and no significant differences between isolated pronator teres muscle rerouting were compared with those undergoing simultaneous treatment of carpal flexion and thumb adduction deformities (p > 0.05).There should be no age restriction to surgery, as all age groups appear to benefit from similar improvements in range of motion and upper limb function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical faculty University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. nadicat@eunet.rs.

ABSTRACT

Aim: This study evaluates the effects of three surgical procedures in the treatment of pronation deformities of the forearm in cerebral palsy patients; namely the transposition of pronator teres to extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle; and rerouting of the pronator teres muscle with or without pronator quadratus muscle myotomy.

Methods: Sixty-one patients, 48 male/13 female, with a mean age of 17 years (5-41 years) were treated between 1971 and 2011. Pronator teres transposition was performed in 10, pronator rerouting in 35, and pronator rereouting with pronator quadratus myotomy in 16 patients. Ranges of motion, and assessments using the Quick Dash, Mayo Scoring, and Functional Classification system of upper extremity, were made before and after surgery. Mean follow-up was 17.5 years (3-41 years).

Results: All three procedures led to significantly improved ranges of motion and upper limb function, with good/excellent results in 80 % of patients. Mean active supination improved from 10 ° (0-60 °) to 85 ° (30-90 °) (p < 0.001). There were significant improvements in Functional Classification system for the upper extremity scores (p < 0.003), Mean Quick Dash Scores improved from 58.41 (38.63-79.54) to 44.59 (27.27-68.18), and mean MEPS improved from 68 (30-85) to 84 (60-100) following surgery. All three techniques had statistically improved MEPS following surgery (p < 0.001); only the pronator teres muscle rerouting with pronator quadratus myotomy showed an improved Functional Classification system for the upper extremity score (p < 0.05); and only the pronator teres rerouting procedure showed an improved Quick Dash score (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in outcomes between different ages groups, and no significant differences between isolated pronator teres muscle rerouting were compared with those undergoing simultaneous treatment of carpal flexion and thumb adduction deformities (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: Surgery is very effective in the management of pronation deformities of the forearm in patients with cerebral palsy. Isolated pronator teres rerouting is probably the most effective and simple technique. Adjunctive pronator quadratus myotomy does not lead to an improvement in the results and requires an additional surgical approach. There should be no age restriction to surgery, as all age groups appear to benefit from similar improvements in range of motion and upper limb function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a Pronation deformity of the right forearm in a spastic form of cerebral palsy before surgery. b Following corrective surgery by rerouting the pronator teres muscle
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Fig4: a Pronation deformity of the right forearm in a spastic form of cerebral palsy before surgery. b Following corrective surgery by rerouting the pronator teres muscle

Mentions: When analysing each individual surgical procedure separately, it was found that all three surgical techniques had statistically improved MEPS following surgery (p < 0.001), and there were no tangible differences between the three procedures. However, only the pronator teres muscle rerouting with pronator quadratus myotomy showed a statistically improved postoperative result using the Functional Classification system for the upper extremity (p < 0.05), and similarly only the pronator teres rerouting procedure showed a statistically improved Quick Dash Score postoperatively (p < 0.05) (Fig. 4a, b).Fig. 4


The results of surgical treatment for pronation deformities of the forearm in cerebral palsy after a mean follow-up of 17.5 years.

Čobeljić G, Rajković S, Bajin Z, Lešić A, Bumbaširević M, Aleksić M, Atkinson HD - J Orthop Surg Res (2015)

a Pronation deformity of the right forearm in a spastic form of cerebral palsy before surgery. b Following corrective surgery by rerouting the pronator teres muscle
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495804&req=5

Fig4: a Pronation deformity of the right forearm in a spastic form of cerebral palsy before surgery. b Following corrective surgery by rerouting the pronator teres muscle
Mentions: When analysing each individual surgical procedure separately, it was found that all three surgical techniques had statistically improved MEPS following surgery (p < 0.001), and there were no tangible differences between the three procedures. However, only the pronator teres muscle rerouting with pronator quadratus myotomy showed a statistically improved postoperative result using the Functional Classification system for the upper extremity (p < 0.05), and similarly only the pronator teres rerouting procedure showed a statistically improved Quick Dash Score postoperatively (p < 0.05) (Fig. 4a, b).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: All three procedures led to significantly improved ranges of motion and upper limb function, with good/excellent results in 80 % of patients.There were no statistically significant differences in outcomes between different ages groups, and no significant differences between isolated pronator teres muscle rerouting were compared with those undergoing simultaneous treatment of carpal flexion and thumb adduction deformities (p > 0.05).There should be no age restriction to surgery, as all age groups appear to benefit from similar improvements in range of motion and upper limb function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical faculty University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. nadicat@eunet.rs.

ABSTRACT

Aim: This study evaluates the effects of three surgical procedures in the treatment of pronation deformities of the forearm in cerebral palsy patients; namely the transposition of pronator teres to extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle; and rerouting of the pronator teres muscle with or without pronator quadratus muscle myotomy.

Methods: Sixty-one patients, 48 male/13 female, with a mean age of 17 years (5-41 years) were treated between 1971 and 2011. Pronator teres transposition was performed in 10, pronator rerouting in 35, and pronator rereouting with pronator quadratus myotomy in 16 patients. Ranges of motion, and assessments using the Quick Dash, Mayo Scoring, and Functional Classification system of upper extremity, were made before and after surgery. Mean follow-up was 17.5 years (3-41 years).

Results: All three procedures led to significantly improved ranges of motion and upper limb function, with good/excellent results in 80 % of patients. Mean active supination improved from 10 ° (0-60 °) to 85 ° (30-90 °) (p < 0.001). There were significant improvements in Functional Classification system for the upper extremity scores (p < 0.003), Mean Quick Dash Scores improved from 58.41 (38.63-79.54) to 44.59 (27.27-68.18), and mean MEPS improved from 68 (30-85) to 84 (60-100) following surgery. All three techniques had statistically improved MEPS following surgery (p < 0.001); only the pronator teres muscle rerouting with pronator quadratus myotomy showed an improved Functional Classification system for the upper extremity score (p < 0.05); and only the pronator teres rerouting procedure showed an improved Quick Dash score (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in outcomes between different ages groups, and no significant differences between isolated pronator teres muscle rerouting were compared with those undergoing simultaneous treatment of carpal flexion and thumb adduction deformities (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: Surgery is very effective in the management of pronation deformities of the forearm in patients with cerebral palsy. Isolated pronator teres rerouting is probably the most effective and simple technique. Adjunctive pronator quadratus myotomy does not lead to an improvement in the results and requires an additional surgical approach. There should be no age restriction to surgery, as all age groups appear to benefit from similar improvements in range of motion and upper limb function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus