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Gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects of piptadeniastrum Africanum on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

Ateufack G, Domgnim Mokam EC, Mbiantcha M, Dongmo Feudjio RB, David N, Kamanyi A - BMC Complement Altern Med (2015)

Bottom Line: As such, both extracts were found to exhibit preventive and curative effects through the release of NO and growth factors.Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark extracts thus have gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects, which could result from their activities by stimulating important cellular mechanisms such as migration and proliferation of epithelial cells that may have a cytoprotective effect by stimulating the release of prostaglandins.These results are required to confirm the ethnopharmacological use of Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark in the treatment of ulcer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Animal Physiology and Phytopharmacology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, P.O. Box 67, Dschang, Cameroon. ateufack2000@yahoo.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Gastric peptic ulcer is one of the common disorders of gastrointestinal tract, which occur due to an imbalance between the offensive and defensive factors. It is an illness that affects a considerable number of people worldwide. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiulcerogenic and antiulcer effects and recognize the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark extracts.

Methods: The aqueous and methanol extracts of Piptadeniastrum africanum were administered at the doses 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg to evaluate their effects on gastric ulcer induced by the HCl/ethanol mixture, indomethacin and acetic acid in Wistar strain male adult rats, aged between 12 and 16 weeks and weighing between 180 and 220 g. Ranitidine, Maalox and Misoprostol were used as standard drugs. Histopathological examination and nitric oxide level were performed to evaluate the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum. Phytochemical screening was carried out to identify known phytochemicals present in these extracts.

Results: The aqueous and methanol extracts of stem bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum significantly inhibited (p < 0.01) gastric ulceration induced by HCl/ethanol to the percentages of inhibition of 81.38; 98.75 and 100 % for the aqueous extract and then 75.83, 89.76 and 96.52 % for the methanol extract, and with the Indomethacin-induced ulcers, aqueous and methanol extracts of bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum reduce significantly (p < 0.01) induced gastric lesions in rats, with percentage of cure 35.75; 52.33 and 98.58 % for the aqueous extract, and 33.7; 51.97; and 65.93 to the methanol extract. The results revealed a significant reduction of ulcerated surface in both extracts and increase of nitric oxide (NO) level with methanol extract. When compared to methanol extract, aqueous extract showed more pronounced effects, corresponding to percentages of healing of 59. 92; 84.12 and 59.65 % for the aqueous extract; and 70.43; 55.49 and 57.59 % for the methanol extract in the ulcer induced by acetic acid, all at the respective doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg. Histopathological observations also demonstrated curative effect. As such, both extracts were found to exhibit preventive and curative effects through the release of NO and growth factors. This could also be due to the presence of phytochemicals such as alkaloids, flavonoids, phenols and saponins which act as antisecretory agents.

Conclusions: Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark extracts thus have gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects, which could result from their activities by stimulating important cellular mechanisms such as migration and proliferation of epithelial cells that may have a cytoprotective effect by stimulating the release of prostaglandins. These results are required to confirm the ethnopharmacological use of Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark in the treatment of ulcer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Macroscopic and histological study of acetic acid-induced gastric damage in rats. a’ & a: stomach and histological section of a normal control rat: no injuries to the gastric mucosa are seen and the gastric wall is normal. b & b’: stomach and histological section of a ulcer control rat: there is severe destruction of the surface epithelium and necrotic lesions penetrating deeply into mucosa and sub mucosa layer. c & c’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with Maalox (50 mg/kg): the gastric wall appears normally, but there is edema of mucosa and sub mucosa layer. d & d’: stomach and histological section of rat treated ranitidine (50 mg/kg): the gastric wall appears normally with all layers. e & e’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 125 mg/kg of aqueous extract: there is mild disruption to the sub mucosal layer. f’ & f: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 250 mg/kg aqueous extract: there is moderate disruption to the surface epithelium. g & g’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 500 mg/kg of aqueous extract: there is mild disruption to sub mucosal layer and edema of the muscle. h & h’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 125 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is mild disruption to the epithelium surface and the sub mucosal layer and edema of the serosal layer. i & i’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 250 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is mild disruption to the epithelium surface and edema of submucosal layer and serosal layer. j & j’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 500 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is moderate disruption to the epithelium surface although the gastric wall appears normally
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Fig3: Macroscopic and histological study of acetic acid-induced gastric damage in rats. a’ & a: stomach and histological section of a normal control rat: no injuries to the gastric mucosa are seen and the gastric wall is normal. b & b’: stomach and histological section of a ulcer control rat: there is severe destruction of the surface epithelium and necrotic lesions penetrating deeply into mucosa and sub mucosa layer. c & c’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with Maalox (50 mg/kg): the gastric wall appears normally, but there is edema of mucosa and sub mucosa layer. d & d’: stomach and histological section of rat treated ranitidine (50 mg/kg): the gastric wall appears normally with all layers. e & e’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 125 mg/kg of aqueous extract: there is mild disruption to the sub mucosal layer. f’ & f: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 250 mg/kg aqueous extract: there is moderate disruption to the surface epithelium. g & g’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 500 mg/kg of aqueous extract: there is mild disruption to sub mucosal layer and edema of the muscle. h & h’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 125 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is mild disruption to the epithelium surface and the sub mucosal layer and edema of the serosal layer. i & i’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 250 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is mild disruption to the epithelium surface and edema of submucosal layer and serosal layer. j & j’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 500 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is moderate disruption to the epithelium surface although the gastric wall appears normally

Mentions: The administration of acetic acid to the gastric mucosa of rats is capable of producing a well-defined lesion. The healing effect of aqueous and methanol extracts of Piptadeniastrum africanum was demonstrated for the first time when the healing of chronic gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid in rats was accelerated. The total surface area of ulceration obtained with controls was 94.07 ± 7.99 mm2 (Fig. 3b). The oral administration of aqueous and methanol extracts at the doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg for 14 consecutive days accelerated the healing of gastric ulcers in rats with a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in ulcer surface area from 94.07 ± 7.99 mm2 to 37.95 ± 1.06; 15.04 ± 0.84 and 38.21 ± 0.97mm2 for the aqueous extract and 28.00 ± 1.57; 42.15 ± 1.10 and 40.16 ± 0.65 mm2 for the methanol extract, respectively. Maalox and Ranitidine also reduced ulcer surface area significantly (p < 0.01) when compared with the control group. The mucus weight of control (177.17 ± 7.67 mg) significantly decreased when the aqueous and methanol extracts were administrated at the doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg (Table 3).Fig. 3


Gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects of piptadeniastrum Africanum on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

Ateufack G, Domgnim Mokam EC, Mbiantcha M, Dongmo Feudjio RB, David N, Kamanyi A - BMC Complement Altern Med (2015)

Macroscopic and histological study of acetic acid-induced gastric damage in rats. a’ & a: stomach and histological section of a normal control rat: no injuries to the gastric mucosa are seen and the gastric wall is normal. b & b’: stomach and histological section of a ulcer control rat: there is severe destruction of the surface epithelium and necrotic lesions penetrating deeply into mucosa and sub mucosa layer. c & c’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with Maalox (50 mg/kg): the gastric wall appears normally, but there is edema of mucosa and sub mucosa layer. d & d’: stomach and histological section of rat treated ranitidine (50 mg/kg): the gastric wall appears normally with all layers. e & e’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 125 mg/kg of aqueous extract: there is mild disruption to the sub mucosal layer. f’ & f: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 250 mg/kg aqueous extract: there is moderate disruption to the surface epithelium. g & g’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 500 mg/kg of aqueous extract: there is mild disruption to sub mucosal layer and edema of the muscle. h & h’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 125 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is mild disruption to the epithelium surface and the sub mucosal layer and edema of the serosal layer. i & i’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 250 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is mild disruption to the epithelium surface and edema of submucosal layer and serosal layer. j & j’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 500 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is moderate disruption to the epithelium surface although the gastric wall appears normally
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495702&req=5

Fig3: Macroscopic and histological study of acetic acid-induced gastric damage in rats. a’ & a: stomach and histological section of a normal control rat: no injuries to the gastric mucosa are seen and the gastric wall is normal. b & b’: stomach and histological section of a ulcer control rat: there is severe destruction of the surface epithelium and necrotic lesions penetrating deeply into mucosa and sub mucosa layer. c & c’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with Maalox (50 mg/kg): the gastric wall appears normally, but there is edema of mucosa and sub mucosa layer. d & d’: stomach and histological section of rat treated ranitidine (50 mg/kg): the gastric wall appears normally with all layers. e & e’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 125 mg/kg of aqueous extract: there is mild disruption to the sub mucosal layer. f’ & f: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 250 mg/kg aqueous extract: there is moderate disruption to the surface epithelium. g & g’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 500 mg/kg of aqueous extract: there is mild disruption to sub mucosal layer and edema of the muscle. h & h’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 125 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is mild disruption to the epithelium surface and the sub mucosal layer and edema of the serosal layer. i & i’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 250 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is mild disruption to the epithelium surface and edema of submucosal layer and serosal layer. j & j’: stomach and histological section of rat treated with 500 mg/kg of methanol extract: there is moderate disruption to the epithelium surface although the gastric wall appears normally
Mentions: The administration of acetic acid to the gastric mucosa of rats is capable of producing a well-defined lesion. The healing effect of aqueous and methanol extracts of Piptadeniastrum africanum was demonstrated for the first time when the healing of chronic gastric ulcer induced by acetic acid in rats was accelerated. The total surface area of ulceration obtained with controls was 94.07 ± 7.99 mm2 (Fig. 3b). The oral administration of aqueous and methanol extracts at the doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg for 14 consecutive days accelerated the healing of gastric ulcers in rats with a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in ulcer surface area from 94.07 ± 7.99 mm2 to 37.95 ± 1.06; 15.04 ± 0.84 and 38.21 ± 0.97mm2 for the aqueous extract and 28.00 ± 1.57; 42.15 ± 1.10 and 40.16 ± 0.65 mm2 for the methanol extract, respectively. Maalox and Ranitidine also reduced ulcer surface area significantly (p < 0.01) when compared with the control group. The mucus weight of control (177.17 ± 7.67 mg) significantly decreased when the aqueous and methanol extracts were administrated at the doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg (Table 3).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: As such, both extracts were found to exhibit preventive and curative effects through the release of NO and growth factors.Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark extracts thus have gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects, which could result from their activities by stimulating important cellular mechanisms such as migration and proliferation of epithelial cells that may have a cytoprotective effect by stimulating the release of prostaglandins.These results are required to confirm the ethnopharmacological use of Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark in the treatment of ulcer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Animal Physiology and Phytopharmacology, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, P.O. Box 67, Dschang, Cameroon. ateufack2000@yahoo.fr.

ABSTRACT

Background: Gastric peptic ulcer is one of the common disorders of gastrointestinal tract, which occur due to an imbalance between the offensive and defensive factors. It is an illness that affects a considerable number of people worldwide. This study was conducted to evaluate the antiulcerogenic and antiulcer effects and recognize the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark extracts.

Methods: The aqueous and methanol extracts of Piptadeniastrum africanum were administered at the doses 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg to evaluate their effects on gastric ulcer induced by the HCl/ethanol mixture, indomethacin and acetic acid in Wistar strain male adult rats, aged between 12 and 16 weeks and weighing between 180 and 220 g. Ranitidine, Maalox and Misoprostol were used as standard drugs. Histopathological examination and nitric oxide level were performed to evaluate the basic mechanism of action of Piptadeniastrum africanum. Phytochemical screening was carried out to identify known phytochemicals present in these extracts.

Results: The aqueous and methanol extracts of stem bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum significantly inhibited (p < 0.01) gastric ulceration induced by HCl/ethanol to the percentages of inhibition of 81.38; 98.75 and 100 % for the aqueous extract and then 75.83, 89.76 and 96.52 % for the methanol extract, and with the Indomethacin-induced ulcers, aqueous and methanol extracts of bark of Piptadeniastrum africanum reduce significantly (p < 0.01) induced gastric lesions in rats, with percentage of cure 35.75; 52.33 and 98.58 % for the aqueous extract, and 33.7; 51.97; and 65.93 to the methanol extract. The results revealed a significant reduction of ulcerated surface in both extracts and increase of nitric oxide (NO) level with methanol extract. When compared to methanol extract, aqueous extract showed more pronounced effects, corresponding to percentages of healing of 59. 92; 84.12 and 59.65 % for the aqueous extract; and 70.43; 55.49 and 57.59 % for the methanol extract in the ulcer induced by acetic acid, all at the respective doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg. Histopathological observations also demonstrated curative effect. As such, both extracts were found to exhibit preventive and curative effects through the release of NO and growth factors. This could also be due to the presence of phytochemicals such as alkaloids, flavonoids, phenols and saponins which act as antisecretory agents.

Conclusions: Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark extracts thus have gastroprotective and ulcer healing effects, which could result from their activities by stimulating important cellular mechanisms such as migration and proliferation of epithelial cells that may have a cytoprotective effect by stimulating the release of prostaglandins. These results are required to confirm the ethnopharmacological use of Piptadeniastrum africanum stem bark in the treatment of ulcer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus