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Accurate quantitative measurements of brachial artery cross-sectional vascular area and vascular volume elastic modulus using automated oscillometric measurements: comparison with brachial artery ultrasound.

Tomiyama Y, Yoshinaga K, Fujii S, Ochi N, Inoue M, Nishida M, Aziki K, Horie T, Katoh C, Tamaki N - Hypertens. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Rest eA and VE measurement showed good reproducibility (eA: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.88, V(E): ICC=0.78).V(E) was also decreased (0.81±0.16 vs. 0.65±0.11 mm Hg/%, P<0.001) after NTG.Therefore, this is a reliable approach and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Increasing vascular diameter and attenuated vascular elasticity may be reliable markers for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements have been complex, operator-dependent or invasive. Recently, we developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure a brachial artery's estimated area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (V(E)). The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and V(E). Rest eA and V(E) were measured using the recently developed automated detector with the oscillometric method. eA was estimated using pressure/volume curves and V(E) was defined as follows (V(E)=Δ pressure/ (100 × Δ area/area) mm Hg/%). Sixteen volunteers (age 35.2±13.1 years) underwent the oscillometric measurements and brachial ultrasound at rest and under nitroglycerin (NTG) administration. Oscillometric measurement was performed twice on different days. The rest eA correlated with ultrasound-measured brachial artery area (r=0.77, P<0.001). Rest eA and VE measurement showed good reproducibility (eA: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.88, V(E): ICC=0.78). Under NTG stress, eA was significantly increased (12.3±3.0 vs. 17.1±4.6 mm(2), P<0.001), and this was similar to the case with ultrasound evaluation (4.46±0.72 vs. 4.73±0.75 mm, P<0.001). V(E) was also decreased (0.81±0.16 vs. 0.65±0.11 mm Hg/%, P<0.001) after NTG. Cross-sectional vascular area calculated using this automated oscillometric measurement correlated with ultrasound measurement and showed good reproducibility. Therefore, this is a reliable approach and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Oscillometric measurement set-up. A triple lumen cuff was put on the upper arm. The triple lumen cuff included central pressure sensor cuff and two outside cuffs. The central part of the triple lumen cuff detected the exact vascular volume change. A main control unit generated a precise amount of air into all three cuffs. After sending the precise amount of air, two tubes to the outside cuffs were occluded. These amounts of air changed the vascular volume and added a stable pressure to the vessel. After sending the air, the main control unit changed a valve connection to the central cuff and the central cuff changed its role. The central cuff then sensed the vascular volume change and controlled the cuff pressure. The central pressure sensor cuff detected BP–CP differences during heartbeats. Using this information, the main control unit made pressure/volume curves. (b) Calculation of estimated cross-sectional area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (VE) using pressure/volume curves. When cuff pressure became zero, the calculated cross-sectional vascular area represented baseline vascular area. BP, blood pressure; CP, cuff pressure. A full color version of this figure is available at the Hypertension Research journal online.
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fig2: (a) Oscillometric measurement set-up. A triple lumen cuff was put on the upper arm. The triple lumen cuff included central pressure sensor cuff and two outside cuffs. The central part of the triple lumen cuff detected the exact vascular volume change. A main control unit generated a precise amount of air into all three cuffs. After sending the precise amount of air, two tubes to the outside cuffs were occluded. These amounts of air changed the vascular volume and added a stable pressure to the vessel. After sending the air, the main control unit changed a valve connection to the central cuff and the central cuff changed its role. The central cuff then sensed the vascular volume change and controlled the cuff pressure. The central pressure sensor cuff detected BP–CP differences during heartbeats. Using this information, the main control unit made pressure/volume curves. (b) Calculation of estimated cross-sectional area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (VE) using pressure/volume curves. When cuff pressure became zero, the calculated cross-sectional vascular area represented baseline vascular area. BP, blood pressure; CP, cuff pressure. A full color version of this figure is available at the Hypertension Research journal online.

Mentions: Subjects followed the same instructions they had received for ultrasound measurements before the studies. Participants underwent oscillometric measurements after overnight fasting. We performed rest brachial arterial cross-sectional area and functional measurements using a newly developed device, the Health Chronos TM-2771 prototype (A&D Company, Tokyo, Japan) (Figure 2a).14 Data acquisition took 6 min (Figure 1) and included measurements of BP, eA and VE (that is, vascular stiffness). After the rest data acquisitions, participants rested for 15 min. Then, subjects received sublingual NTG (0.3 mg). At 2 min after sublingual NTG administration, the second measurements were performed (Figure 1b).


Accurate quantitative measurements of brachial artery cross-sectional vascular area and vascular volume elastic modulus using automated oscillometric measurements: comparison with brachial artery ultrasound.

Tomiyama Y, Yoshinaga K, Fujii S, Ochi N, Inoue M, Nishida M, Aziki K, Horie T, Katoh C, Tamaki N - Hypertens. Res. (2015)

(a) Oscillometric measurement set-up. A triple lumen cuff was put on the upper arm. The triple lumen cuff included central pressure sensor cuff and two outside cuffs. The central part of the triple lumen cuff detected the exact vascular volume change. A main control unit generated a precise amount of air into all three cuffs. After sending the precise amount of air, two tubes to the outside cuffs were occluded. These amounts of air changed the vascular volume and added a stable pressure to the vessel. After sending the air, the main control unit changed a valve connection to the central cuff and the central cuff changed its role. The central cuff then sensed the vascular volume change and controlled the cuff pressure. The central pressure sensor cuff detected BP–CP differences during heartbeats. Using this information, the main control unit made pressure/volume curves. (b) Calculation of estimated cross-sectional area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (VE) using pressure/volume curves. When cuff pressure became zero, the calculated cross-sectional vascular area represented baseline vascular area. BP, blood pressure; CP, cuff pressure. A full color version of this figure is available at the Hypertension Research journal online.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495642&req=5

fig2: (a) Oscillometric measurement set-up. A triple lumen cuff was put on the upper arm. The triple lumen cuff included central pressure sensor cuff and two outside cuffs. The central part of the triple lumen cuff detected the exact vascular volume change. A main control unit generated a precise amount of air into all three cuffs. After sending the precise amount of air, two tubes to the outside cuffs were occluded. These amounts of air changed the vascular volume and added a stable pressure to the vessel. After sending the air, the main control unit changed a valve connection to the central cuff and the central cuff changed its role. The central cuff then sensed the vascular volume change and controlled the cuff pressure. The central pressure sensor cuff detected BP–CP differences during heartbeats. Using this information, the main control unit made pressure/volume curves. (b) Calculation of estimated cross-sectional area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (VE) using pressure/volume curves. When cuff pressure became zero, the calculated cross-sectional vascular area represented baseline vascular area. BP, blood pressure; CP, cuff pressure. A full color version of this figure is available at the Hypertension Research journal online.
Mentions: Subjects followed the same instructions they had received for ultrasound measurements before the studies. Participants underwent oscillometric measurements after overnight fasting. We performed rest brachial arterial cross-sectional area and functional measurements using a newly developed device, the Health Chronos TM-2771 prototype (A&D Company, Tokyo, Japan) (Figure 2a).14 Data acquisition took 6 min (Figure 1) and included measurements of BP, eA and VE (that is, vascular stiffness). After the rest data acquisitions, participants rested for 15 min. Then, subjects received sublingual NTG (0.3 mg). At 2 min after sublingual NTG administration, the second measurements were performed (Figure 1b).

Bottom Line: Rest eA and VE measurement showed good reproducibility (eA: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.88, V(E): ICC=0.78).V(E) was also decreased (0.81±0.16 vs. 0.65±0.11 mm Hg/%, P<0.001) after NTG.Therefore, this is a reliable approach and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Increasing vascular diameter and attenuated vascular elasticity may be reliable markers for atherosclerotic risk assessment. However, previous measurements have been complex, operator-dependent or invasive. Recently, we developed a new automated oscillometric method to measure a brachial artery's estimated area (eA) and volume elastic modulus (V(E)). The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of new automated oscillometric measurement of eA and V(E). Rest eA and V(E) were measured using the recently developed automated detector with the oscillometric method. eA was estimated using pressure/volume curves and V(E) was defined as follows (V(E)=Δ pressure/ (100 × Δ area/area) mm Hg/%). Sixteen volunteers (age 35.2±13.1 years) underwent the oscillometric measurements and brachial ultrasound at rest and under nitroglycerin (NTG) administration. Oscillometric measurement was performed twice on different days. The rest eA correlated with ultrasound-measured brachial artery area (r=0.77, P<0.001). Rest eA and VE measurement showed good reproducibility (eA: intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)=0.88, V(E): ICC=0.78). Under NTG stress, eA was significantly increased (12.3±3.0 vs. 17.1±4.6 mm(2), P<0.001), and this was similar to the case with ultrasound evaluation (4.46±0.72 vs. 4.73±0.75 mm, P<0.001). V(E) was also decreased (0.81±0.16 vs. 0.65±0.11 mm Hg/%, P<0.001) after NTG. Cross-sectional vascular area calculated using this automated oscillometric measurement correlated with ultrasound measurement and showed good reproducibility. Therefore, this is a reliable approach and this modality may have practical application to automatically assess muscular artery diameter and elasticity in clinical or epidemiological settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus