Limits...
Senior orienteering athletes as a model of healthy aging: a mixed-method approach.

Östlund-Lagerström L, Blomberg K, Algilani S, Schoultz M, Kihlgren A, Brummer RJ, Schoultz I - BMC Geriatr (2015)

Bottom Line: The orienteering athletes enrolled in the study reported a significantly better health compared to the free-living older adults (p <0.0015) on all questionnaires except HADS.In conclusion our results show that senior orienteering may represent an ideal model in studies of healthy aging.Furthermore, our results show that even though the senior orienteering athletes are well aware of the long-term benefits of physical activity and have practiced the sport from a young age, they particularly point out that their engagement in orienteering is driven by short-term values such as enjoyment and passion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, S-701 82, Örebro, Sweden. lina.ostlund-lagerstrom@oru.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: The proportion of individuals reaching an old age is increasing and will, in the near future consume a majority of health care resources. It is therefore essential to facilitate the maintenance of optimal functionality among older adults. By characterizing older individuals experiencing wellbeing, factors important to promote and maintain health through life can be identified. Orienteering is an endurance-running sport involving cross-country navigation, demanding both cognitive and physical skills of its practitioners. In this study we aim to explore a Swedish population of senior orienteering athletes as a potential model of healthy aging.

Methods: We undertook a mixed-method approach using quantitative (i.e. questionnaires) and qualitative (i.e. focus group discussions) methodologies to explore a population of senior orienteering athletes (n = 136, median age = 69 (67-71) years). Quantitative data was collected to evaluate health status, assessing physical activity (Frändin-Grimby activity scale (FGAS)), functional wellbeing (EQ-5D-5 L), gut health (Gastrointestinal symptoms rating scale (GSRS)), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS)) and overall health (Health index (HI)). The data was further compared to reference values obtained from a free-living Swedish population of older adults. Focus group discussions (FGD) were performed as a complement to the quantitative data to facilitate the individuals' own views on health and physical activity.

Results: The orienteering athletes enrolled in the study reported a significantly better health compared to the free-living older adults (p <0.0015) on all questionnaires except HADS. The high health status displayed in this population was further confirmed by the FGD findings, in which all participants declared their engagement in orienteering as a prerequisite for health.

Conclusions: In conclusion our results show that senior orienteering may represent an ideal model in studies of healthy aging. Furthermore, our results show that even though the senior orienteering athletes are well aware of the long-term benefits of physical activity and have practiced the sport from a young age, they particularly point out that their engagement in orienteering is driven by short-term values such as enjoyment and passion. This may be important to consider when introducing public health interventions among the general older population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of the recruitment process
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495641&req=5

Fig2: Overview of the recruitment process

Mentions: Older adults actively practicing and competing in orienteering were recruited based on the start list of the O-Ringen international orienteering event and were invited to complete phase 1 and 3 of the study. See Fig. 2 for an overview of the recruitment process. O-Ringen takes place annually at different locations in Sweden and is the world’s largest orienteering event attracting 15.000–20.000 participants each year. A personal information letter was sent to the first 200 athletes ≥aged 65 years old registered to compete in the 2013 O-Ringen. The letter contained a thorough description of the study as well as a consent form. After signing the consent form the participants were enrolled and given a study code to avoid identification by name throughout the study. The participants were also encouraged to contact the researchers if they had any questions regarding the study.Fig. 2


Senior orienteering athletes as a model of healthy aging: a mixed-method approach.

Östlund-Lagerström L, Blomberg K, Algilani S, Schoultz M, Kihlgren A, Brummer RJ, Schoultz I - BMC Geriatr (2015)

Overview of the recruitment process
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495641&req=5

Fig2: Overview of the recruitment process
Mentions: Older adults actively practicing and competing in orienteering were recruited based on the start list of the O-Ringen international orienteering event and were invited to complete phase 1 and 3 of the study. See Fig. 2 for an overview of the recruitment process. O-Ringen takes place annually at different locations in Sweden and is the world’s largest orienteering event attracting 15.000–20.000 participants each year. A personal information letter was sent to the first 200 athletes ≥aged 65 years old registered to compete in the 2013 O-Ringen. The letter contained a thorough description of the study as well as a consent form. After signing the consent form the participants were enrolled and given a study code to avoid identification by name throughout the study. The participants were also encouraged to contact the researchers if they had any questions regarding the study.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: The orienteering athletes enrolled in the study reported a significantly better health compared to the free-living older adults (p <0.0015) on all questionnaires except HADS.In conclusion our results show that senior orienteering may represent an ideal model in studies of healthy aging.Furthermore, our results show that even though the senior orienteering athletes are well aware of the long-term benefits of physical activity and have practiced the sport from a young age, they particularly point out that their engagement in orienteering is driven by short-term values such as enjoyment and passion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Nutrition and Physical Activity Research Centre, Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, S-701 82, Örebro, Sweden. lina.ostlund-lagerstrom@oru.se.

ABSTRACT

Background: The proportion of individuals reaching an old age is increasing and will, in the near future consume a majority of health care resources. It is therefore essential to facilitate the maintenance of optimal functionality among older adults. By characterizing older individuals experiencing wellbeing, factors important to promote and maintain health through life can be identified. Orienteering is an endurance-running sport involving cross-country navigation, demanding both cognitive and physical skills of its practitioners. In this study we aim to explore a Swedish population of senior orienteering athletes as a potential model of healthy aging.

Methods: We undertook a mixed-method approach using quantitative (i.e. questionnaires) and qualitative (i.e. focus group discussions) methodologies to explore a population of senior orienteering athletes (n = 136, median age = 69 (67-71) years). Quantitative data was collected to evaluate health status, assessing physical activity (Frändin-Grimby activity scale (FGAS)), functional wellbeing (EQ-5D-5 L), gut health (Gastrointestinal symptoms rating scale (GSRS)), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS)) and overall health (Health index (HI)). The data was further compared to reference values obtained from a free-living Swedish population of older adults. Focus group discussions (FGD) were performed as a complement to the quantitative data to facilitate the individuals' own views on health and physical activity.

Results: The orienteering athletes enrolled in the study reported a significantly better health compared to the free-living older adults (p <0.0015) on all questionnaires except HADS. The high health status displayed in this population was further confirmed by the FGD findings, in which all participants declared their engagement in orienteering as a prerequisite for health.

Conclusions: In conclusion our results show that senior orienteering may represent an ideal model in studies of healthy aging. Furthermore, our results show that even though the senior orienteering athletes are well aware of the long-term benefits of physical activity and have practiced the sport from a young age, they particularly point out that their engagement in orienteering is driven by short-term values such as enjoyment and passion. This may be important to consider when introducing public health interventions among the general older population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus