Limits...
Nonsuicidal self-injury in sexual minority college students: a test of theoretical integration.

Muehlenkamp JJ, Hilt LM, Ehlinger PP, McMillan T - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Minority stress was directly associated with NSSI and via perceived burdensomeness, explaining 27 % of the variance.These findings provide evidence that unique stressors individuals face as a result of their sexual minority status increases risk for self-harm by influencing cognitive and emotional processes such as burdensomeness and acquired capability.Implications for prevention, intervention, and future research are briefly discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Eau Claire, WI 54702 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Individuals identifying as a sexual minority report engaging in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) at substantially higher rates compared to their heterosexual peers. Given that NSSI is a known risk factor for suicide, it is important to understand the processes unique to being a sexual minority that increases risk for NSSI so that adequate prevention efforts can be established. The current study integrated Minority Stress Theory and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide to test a model of NSSI and suicide risk.

Methods: A total of 137 college students who identified as a sexual minority completed an anonymous on-line study assessing NSSI, suicidal thoughts/behaviors, and constructs of the minority stress and interpersonal theories. Two linear regressions using bootstrapping analyses were conducted to test our hypotheses.

Results: Minority stress was directly associated with NSSI and via perceived burdensomeness, explaining 27 % of the variance. NSSI was associated with increased risk for suicide thoughts/behaviors directly, and through acquired capability, explaining 45 % of the variance.

Conclusions: These findings provide evidence that unique stressors individuals face as a result of their sexual minority status increases risk for self-harm by influencing cognitive and emotional processes such as burdensomeness and acquired capability. Implications for prevention, intervention, and future research are briefly discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of a meditational model showing associations among minority stress, the proposed mediators (perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness) and NSSI
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495628&req=5

Fig1: Results of a meditational model showing associations among minority stress, the proposed mediators (perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness) and NSSI

Mentions: Hypothesis 1: To examine whether minority stress predicted NSSI via the mediating role of perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness, we specified a model with two mediators, F(3,133) = 16.31, p < .001, R2 = .27. The direct effect of minority stress on NSSI was significant, t = 3.34, p < .001 (CI = 1.81 – 5.78). The indirect effect through perceived burdensomeness was also significant (CI = .69 – 2.83), but not through thwarted belongingness (CI = −.30 - .20). See Fig. 1.Fig. 1


Nonsuicidal self-injury in sexual minority college students: a test of theoretical integration.

Muehlenkamp JJ, Hilt LM, Ehlinger PP, McMillan T - Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health (2015)

Results of a meditational model showing associations among minority stress, the proposed mediators (perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness) and NSSI
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495628&req=5

Fig1: Results of a meditational model showing associations among minority stress, the proposed mediators (perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness) and NSSI
Mentions: Hypothesis 1: To examine whether minority stress predicted NSSI via the mediating role of perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness, we specified a model with two mediators, F(3,133) = 16.31, p < .001, R2 = .27. The direct effect of minority stress on NSSI was significant, t = 3.34, p < .001 (CI = 1.81 – 5.78). The indirect effect through perceived burdensomeness was also significant (CI = .69 – 2.83), but not through thwarted belongingness (CI = −.30 - .20). See Fig. 1.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Minority stress was directly associated with NSSI and via perceived burdensomeness, explaining 27 % of the variance.These findings provide evidence that unique stressors individuals face as a result of their sexual minority status increases risk for self-harm by influencing cognitive and emotional processes such as burdensomeness and acquired capability.Implications for prevention, intervention, and future research are briefly discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, 105 Garfield Ave, Eau Claire, WI 54702 USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Individuals identifying as a sexual minority report engaging in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) at substantially higher rates compared to their heterosexual peers. Given that NSSI is a known risk factor for suicide, it is important to understand the processes unique to being a sexual minority that increases risk for NSSI so that adequate prevention efforts can be established. The current study integrated Minority Stress Theory and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide to test a model of NSSI and suicide risk.

Methods: A total of 137 college students who identified as a sexual minority completed an anonymous on-line study assessing NSSI, suicidal thoughts/behaviors, and constructs of the minority stress and interpersonal theories. Two linear regressions using bootstrapping analyses were conducted to test our hypotheses.

Results: Minority stress was directly associated with NSSI and via perceived burdensomeness, explaining 27 % of the variance. NSSI was associated with increased risk for suicide thoughts/behaviors directly, and through acquired capability, explaining 45 % of the variance.

Conclusions: These findings provide evidence that unique stressors individuals face as a result of their sexual minority status increases risk for self-harm by influencing cognitive and emotional processes such as burdensomeness and acquired capability. Implications for prevention, intervention, and future research are briefly discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus