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Prevalence of malaria parasites in adults and its determinants in malaria endemic area of Kisumu County, Kenya.

Jenkins R, Omollo R, Ongecha M, Sifuna P, Othieno C, Ongeri L, Kingora J, Ogutu B - Malar. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: Therefore, a demographic surveillance site was used to conduct a household survey of adults in the malaria endemic area of Maseno division in Kisumu County near Lake Victoria.Gender was a significant sociodemographic risk factor in both univariate (OR 1.5, p = 0.005) and multivariate (OR 1.4, p = 0.019) analyses.Presence of malaria parasites is common in the adult population of this endemic area, and the rate is greatly increased in women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Services Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, de Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, UK. Rachel@olan.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: The prevalence of malaria parasites in adults in Africa is less well researched than in children. Therefore, a demographic surveillance site was used to conduct a household survey of adults in the malaria endemic area of Maseno division in Kisumu County near Lake Victoria.

Methods: A random survey of 1,190 adults living in a demographic health surveillance site in a malaria endemic area of 70,805 population size was conducted, measuring presence of malaria parasites by slide microscopy. Data were analysed using STATA to calculate the prevalence of malaria and associated risk factors.

Results: The adult prevalence of presence of malaria parasites in Maseno was 28% (95% CI: 25.4-31.0%). Gender was a significant sociodemographic risk factor in both univariate (OR 1.5, p = 0.005) and multivariate (OR 1.4, p = 0.019) analyses. Females were 50% more likely to have malaria than men.

Conclusions: Presence of malaria parasites is common in the adult population of this endemic area, and the rate is greatly increased in women. The presence of such an adult pool of malaria parasites represents a key reservoir factor in transmission of parasites to children, and is relevant for plans to eradicate malaria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Seasonal variation in malaria prevalence.
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Fig2: Seasonal variation in malaria prevalence.

Mentions: There was no significant difference in the risk of malaria with age band, or on any other socio-demographic variable, with the exception of gender (see Table 1). Females had a 50% higher risk of having malaria compared to males (OR 1.5, p = 0.005) in the univariate analysis. There was however variation in malaria prevalence by month of interview, as the survey period ranged from December 2012 to June 2013. This is shown in Figure 2. Over the 6-month period prevalence rates ranging from around 40 to 60% in December, January and February to around 10% between March and June. In the adjusted analysis (Table 2), the risk of malaria is 40% higher in females compared to males (OR 1.4, p = 0.019).Figure 2


Prevalence of malaria parasites in adults and its determinants in malaria endemic area of Kisumu County, Kenya.

Jenkins R, Omollo R, Ongecha M, Sifuna P, Othieno C, Ongeri L, Kingora J, Ogutu B - Malar. J. (2015)

Seasonal variation in malaria prevalence.
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495611&req=5

Fig2: Seasonal variation in malaria prevalence.
Mentions: There was no significant difference in the risk of malaria with age band, or on any other socio-demographic variable, with the exception of gender (see Table 1). Females had a 50% higher risk of having malaria compared to males (OR 1.5, p = 0.005) in the univariate analysis. There was however variation in malaria prevalence by month of interview, as the survey period ranged from December 2012 to June 2013. This is shown in Figure 2. Over the 6-month period prevalence rates ranging from around 40 to 60% in December, January and February to around 10% between March and June. In the adjusted analysis (Table 2), the risk of malaria is 40% higher in females compared to males (OR 1.4, p = 0.019).Figure 2

Bottom Line: Therefore, a demographic surveillance site was used to conduct a household survey of adults in the malaria endemic area of Maseno division in Kisumu County near Lake Victoria.Gender was a significant sociodemographic risk factor in both univariate (OR 1.5, p = 0.005) and multivariate (OR 1.4, p = 0.019) analyses.Presence of malaria parasites is common in the adult population of this endemic area, and the rate is greatly increased in women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Services Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, de Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, UK. Rachel@olan.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: The prevalence of malaria parasites in adults in Africa is less well researched than in children. Therefore, a demographic surveillance site was used to conduct a household survey of adults in the malaria endemic area of Maseno division in Kisumu County near Lake Victoria.

Methods: A random survey of 1,190 adults living in a demographic health surveillance site in a malaria endemic area of 70,805 population size was conducted, measuring presence of malaria parasites by slide microscopy. Data were analysed using STATA to calculate the prevalence of malaria and associated risk factors.

Results: The adult prevalence of presence of malaria parasites in Maseno was 28% (95% CI: 25.4-31.0%). Gender was a significant sociodemographic risk factor in both univariate (OR 1.5, p = 0.005) and multivariate (OR 1.4, p = 0.019) analyses. Females were 50% more likely to have malaria than men.

Conclusions: Presence of malaria parasites is common in the adult population of this endemic area, and the rate is greatly increased in women. The presence of such an adult pool of malaria parasites represents a key reservoir factor in transmission of parasites to children, and is relevant for plans to eradicate malaria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus