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Feeding on Beauveria bassiana-treated Frankliniella occidentalis causes negative effects on the predatory mite Neoseiulus barkeri.

Wu S, Gao Y, Xu X, Wang D, Li J, Wang H, Wang E, Lei Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: When fed on the first instar larvae of F. occidentalis that had been exposed for 12 h to the SZ-26 suspension, the developmental time of preadult N. barkeri was significantly longer, and the longevity and fecundity were significantly lower than that of N. barkeri fed on untreated F. occidentalis.The data showed that B. bassiana has indirect negative effects on N. barkeri population dynamics via influencing their prey F. occidentalis larvae, which indicates that there is a risk in combining B. bassiana with N. barkeri simultaneously for the biocontrol of F. occidentalis.The probable mechanism for the negative effects is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and the predatory mite Neoseiulus barkeri are both potential biocontrol agents for their shared host/prey Frankliniella occidentalis. The combination of the two agents may enhance biological control of F. occidentalis if the fungus does not negatively affect N. barkeri. This study evaluated the indirect effects of B. bassiana strain SZ-26 on N. barkeri mediated by F. occidentalis using the age-stage, two-sex life table. When fed on the first instar larvae of F. occidentalis that had been exposed for 12 h to the SZ-26 suspension, the developmental time of preadult N. barkeri was significantly longer, and the longevity and fecundity were significantly lower than that of N. barkeri fed on untreated F. occidentalis. The mean generation time (T), net reproductive rate (R0), finite rate of increase (λ), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) and predation rates were correspondingly affected. The data showed that B. bassiana has indirect negative effects on N. barkeri population dynamics via influencing their prey F. occidentalis larvae, which indicates that there is a risk in combining B. bassiana with N. barkeri simultaneously for the biocontrol of F. occidentalis. The probable mechanism for the negative effects is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age-specific survival rate (lx), predation rate (kx), and net predation rate (qx) of N. barkeri in control and treatment.
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f6: Age-specific survival rate (lx), predation rate (kx), and net predation rate (qx) of N. barkeri in control and treatment.

Mentions: The age-stage predation rate (cxj) of N. barkeri fed on B. bassiana-treated (treatment) and untreated F. occidentalis larvae (control) are shown in Fig. 5. This shows the trend in the age-stage specific mean number of F. occidentalis larvae consumed by a predator at age x and stage j. Using equations (9) and (10), we calculated the age-specific predation rate (kx) and age-specific net predation rate (qx). Both kx and qx were calculated by considering the sex and stage differentiation (Fig. 6). When offered B. bassiana-treated F. occidentalis larvae, the protonymphs and deutonymphs of N. barkeri consumed more prey, while both female and male adults lived longer when fed on untreated F. occidentalis larvae, and consumed more total prey as adults. By taking survival rates and longevities into account, the net predation rate, C0, was 86.0320 when fed on untreated thrips larvae and 70.1384 when fed on B. bassiana-treated thrips larvae. However, the finite predation rate of N. barkeri was 1.0459 when fed on treated prey, higher than that of N. barkeri fed on untreated prey (Table 3).


Feeding on Beauveria bassiana-treated Frankliniella occidentalis causes negative effects on the predatory mite Neoseiulus barkeri.

Wu S, Gao Y, Xu X, Wang D, Li J, Wang H, Wang E, Lei Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Age-specific survival rate (lx), predation rate (kx), and net predation rate (qx) of N. barkeri in control and treatment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495565&req=5

f6: Age-specific survival rate (lx), predation rate (kx), and net predation rate (qx) of N. barkeri in control and treatment.
Mentions: The age-stage predation rate (cxj) of N. barkeri fed on B. bassiana-treated (treatment) and untreated F. occidentalis larvae (control) are shown in Fig. 5. This shows the trend in the age-stage specific mean number of F. occidentalis larvae consumed by a predator at age x and stage j. Using equations (9) and (10), we calculated the age-specific predation rate (kx) and age-specific net predation rate (qx). Both kx and qx were calculated by considering the sex and stage differentiation (Fig. 6). When offered B. bassiana-treated F. occidentalis larvae, the protonymphs and deutonymphs of N. barkeri consumed more prey, while both female and male adults lived longer when fed on untreated F. occidentalis larvae, and consumed more total prey as adults. By taking survival rates and longevities into account, the net predation rate, C0, was 86.0320 when fed on untreated thrips larvae and 70.1384 when fed on B. bassiana-treated thrips larvae. However, the finite predation rate of N. barkeri was 1.0459 when fed on treated prey, higher than that of N. barkeri fed on untreated prey (Table 3).

Bottom Line: When fed on the first instar larvae of F. occidentalis that had been exposed for 12 h to the SZ-26 suspension, the developmental time of preadult N. barkeri was significantly longer, and the longevity and fecundity were significantly lower than that of N. barkeri fed on untreated F. occidentalis.The data showed that B. bassiana has indirect negative effects on N. barkeri population dynamics via influencing their prey F. occidentalis larvae, which indicates that there is a risk in combining B. bassiana with N. barkeri simultaneously for the biocontrol of F. occidentalis.The probable mechanism for the negative effects is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory for Biology of Plant Diseases and Insect Pests, Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and the predatory mite Neoseiulus barkeri are both potential biocontrol agents for their shared host/prey Frankliniella occidentalis. The combination of the two agents may enhance biological control of F. occidentalis if the fungus does not negatively affect N. barkeri. This study evaluated the indirect effects of B. bassiana strain SZ-26 on N. barkeri mediated by F. occidentalis using the age-stage, two-sex life table. When fed on the first instar larvae of F. occidentalis that had been exposed for 12 h to the SZ-26 suspension, the developmental time of preadult N. barkeri was significantly longer, and the longevity and fecundity were significantly lower than that of N. barkeri fed on untreated F. occidentalis. The mean generation time (T), net reproductive rate (R0), finite rate of increase (λ), intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) and predation rates were correspondingly affected. The data showed that B. bassiana has indirect negative effects on N. barkeri population dynamics via influencing their prey F. occidentalis larvae, which indicates that there is a risk in combining B. bassiana with N. barkeri simultaneously for the biocontrol of F. occidentalis. The probable mechanism for the negative effects is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus