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Growth and reproduction of laboratory-reared neanurid Collembola using a novel slime mould diet.

Hoskins JL, Janion-Scheepers C, Chown SL, Duffy GA - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared.Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark.The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Although significant progress has been made using insect taxa as model organisms, non-tracheated terrestrial arthropods, such as Collembola, are underrepresented as model species. This underrepresentation reflects the difficulty in maintaining populations of specialist Collembola species in the laboratory. Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared. Here we use controlled growth experiments to provide explicit evidence that the species Neanura muscorum can be raised under laboratory conditions when its diet is supplemented with slime mould. Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark. These benefits are further highlighted by the reproductive success of the experimental group and persistence of laboratory breeding stocks of this species and others in the family. The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae. Maintaining laboratory populations of neanurid Collembola species will facilitate their use as model organisms, paving the way for studies that will broaden the current understanding of the environmental physiology of arthropods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Body length change over time for two generations (F1, F2) of Neanura muscorum.Red points represent the experimental group provided with slime mould diet, blue points represent the control group on algae-covered plane tree bark. Fitted models shown with 95% confidence intervals (F1: experimental, y = 1.4205 + 6.1211 x − 1.5328 x2, weighted-R2 = 0.6906; control, y = 0.7486 + 0.9638 x + 0.1662 x2, wR2 = 0.6315. F2: experimental, y = 0.9771 + 3.8062 x + 1.0992 x2, wR2 = 0.6976; control, y = 0.7181 + 0.4565 x + 0.3624 x2, wR2 = 0.7575. Shaded area represents respective F1 or F2 sub-group age range at first egg laying event.
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f3: Body length change over time for two generations (F1, F2) of Neanura muscorum.Red points represent the experimental group provided with slime mould diet, blue points represent the control group on algae-covered plane tree bark. Fitted models shown with 95% confidence intervals (F1: experimental, y = 1.4205 + 6.1211 x − 1.5328 x2, weighted-R2 = 0.6906; control, y = 0.7486 + 0.9638 x + 0.1662 x2, wR2 = 0.6315. F2: experimental, y = 0.9771 + 3.8062 x + 1.0992 x2, wR2 = 0.6976; control, y = 0.7181 + 0.4565 x + 0.3624 x2, wR2 = 0.7575. Shaded area represents respective F1 or F2 sub-group age range at first egg laying event.

Mentions: Only sub-groups of N. muscorum given the P. polycephalum slime mould diet reached sexual maturity and laid eggs. Six out of nine of these sub-groups laid eggs while the three remaining sub-groups, despite appearing to be of comparable maturity, did not. This may be attributed to the relatively small size of these sub-groups, which was dictated by the number of eggs available at the time of founding. F1 experimental sub-groups laid eggs at a younger age than their F2 counterparts (mean/sd age at first egg laying: 52.5 ± 5.20 and 75 ± 14.14 days respectively; Fig. 3), but individuals in F2 sub-groups were smaller than those in F1 sub-groups when viable eggs were laid.


Growth and reproduction of laboratory-reared neanurid Collembola using a novel slime mould diet.

Hoskins JL, Janion-Scheepers C, Chown SL, Duffy GA - Sci Rep (2015)

Body length change over time for two generations (F1, F2) of Neanura muscorum.Red points represent the experimental group provided with slime mould diet, blue points represent the control group on algae-covered plane tree bark. Fitted models shown with 95% confidence intervals (F1: experimental, y = 1.4205 + 6.1211 x − 1.5328 x2, weighted-R2 = 0.6906; control, y = 0.7486 + 0.9638 x + 0.1662 x2, wR2 = 0.6315. F2: experimental, y = 0.9771 + 3.8062 x + 1.0992 x2, wR2 = 0.6976; control, y = 0.7181 + 0.4565 x + 0.3624 x2, wR2 = 0.7575. Shaded area represents respective F1 or F2 sub-group age range at first egg laying event.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495557&req=5

f3: Body length change over time for two generations (F1, F2) of Neanura muscorum.Red points represent the experimental group provided with slime mould diet, blue points represent the control group on algae-covered plane tree bark. Fitted models shown with 95% confidence intervals (F1: experimental, y = 1.4205 + 6.1211 x − 1.5328 x2, weighted-R2 = 0.6906; control, y = 0.7486 + 0.9638 x + 0.1662 x2, wR2 = 0.6315. F2: experimental, y = 0.9771 + 3.8062 x + 1.0992 x2, wR2 = 0.6976; control, y = 0.7181 + 0.4565 x + 0.3624 x2, wR2 = 0.7575. Shaded area represents respective F1 or F2 sub-group age range at first egg laying event.
Mentions: Only sub-groups of N. muscorum given the P. polycephalum slime mould diet reached sexual maturity and laid eggs. Six out of nine of these sub-groups laid eggs while the three remaining sub-groups, despite appearing to be of comparable maturity, did not. This may be attributed to the relatively small size of these sub-groups, which was dictated by the number of eggs available at the time of founding. F1 experimental sub-groups laid eggs at a younger age than their F2 counterparts (mean/sd age at first egg laying: 52.5 ± 5.20 and 75 ± 14.14 days respectively; Fig. 3), but individuals in F2 sub-groups were smaller than those in F1 sub-groups when viable eggs were laid.

Bottom Line: Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared.Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark.The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Although significant progress has been made using insect taxa as model organisms, non-tracheated terrestrial arthropods, such as Collembola, are underrepresented as model species. This underrepresentation reflects the difficulty in maintaining populations of specialist Collembola species in the laboratory. Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared. Here we use controlled growth experiments to provide explicit evidence that the species Neanura muscorum can be raised under laboratory conditions when its diet is supplemented with slime mould. Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark. These benefits are further highlighted by the reproductive success of the experimental group and persistence of laboratory breeding stocks of this species and others in the family. The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae. Maintaining laboratory populations of neanurid Collembola species will facilitate their use as model organisms, paving the way for studies that will broaden the current understanding of the environmental physiology of arthropods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus