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Growth and reproduction of laboratory-reared neanurid Collembola using a novel slime mould diet.

Hoskins JL, Janion-Scheepers C, Chown SL, Duffy GA - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared.Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark.The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Although significant progress has been made using insect taxa as model organisms, non-tracheated terrestrial arthropods, such as Collembola, are underrepresented as model species. This underrepresentation reflects the difficulty in maintaining populations of specialist Collembola species in the laboratory. Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared. Here we use controlled growth experiments to provide explicit evidence that the species Neanura muscorum can be raised under laboratory conditions when its diet is supplemented with slime mould. Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark. These benefits are further highlighted by the reproductive success of the experimental group and persistence of laboratory breeding stocks of this species and others in the family. The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae. Maintaining laboratory populations of neanurid Collembola species will facilitate their use as model organisms, paving the way for studies that will broaden the current understanding of the environmental physiology of arthropods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Photographs representing various Neanura muscorum growth-stages.Neanura muscorum hatchling (a <1 day old), juvenile N. muscorum before first moult (b <5 days old), and adult N. muscorum laying eggs (c).
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f2: Photographs representing various Neanura muscorum growth-stages.Neanura muscorum hatchling (a <1 day old), juvenile N. muscorum before first moult (b <5 days old), and adult N. muscorum laying eggs (c).

Mentions: Multiple photographs of each sub-group (e.g. Fig. 2) were taken on a weekly basis using a calibrated microscope (M205C, Leica Microsystems, Wetzlar, Germany). Measurements of total body length (anterior of the head segment to the posterior of the ultimate abdominal segment) were made from these photographs using Leica Application Suite Software (Leica Microsystems). We aimed to photograph and measure at least five individuals from each sub-group. For large sub-groups, one photograph often captured more than five individuals so all specimens within the photograph were measured. Due to mortality, some of the smaller sub-groups contained fewer than five individuals toward the end of the study, in which case all individuals were photographed and measured. Measurements continued on a weekly basis until either the control or experimental sub-group was determined to have reached sexual maturity. The date of first egg-laying was noted for all sub-groups and all eggs were counted and removed to an incubator to determine their viability.


Growth and reproduction of laboratory-reared neanurid Collembola using a novel slime mould diet.

Hoskins JL, Janion-Scheepers C, Chown SL, Duffy GA - Sci Rep (2015)

Photographs representing various Neanura muscorum growth-stages.Neanura muscorum hatchling (a <1 day old), juvenile N. muscorum before first moult (b <5 days old), and adult N. muscorum laying eggs (c).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495557&req=5

f2: Photographs representing various Neanura muscorum growth-stages.Neanura muscorum hatchling (a <1 day old), juvenile N. muscorum before first moult (b <5 days old), and adult N. muscorum laying eggs (c).
Mentions: Multiple photographs of each sub-group (e.g. Fig. 2) were taken on a weekly basis using a calibrated microscope (M205C, Leica Microsystems, Wetzlar, Germany). Measurements of total body length (anterior of the head segment to the posterior of the ultimate abdominal segment) were made from these photographs using Leica Application Suite Software (Leica Microsystems). We aimed to photograph and measure at least five individuals from each sub-group. For large sub-groups, one photograph often captured more than five individuals so all specimens within the photograph were measured. Due to mortality, some of the smaller sub-groups contained fewer than five individuals toward the end of the study, in which case all individuals were photographed and measured. Measurements continued on a weekly basis until either the control or experimental sub-group was determined to have reached sexual maturity. The date of first egg-laying was noted for all sub-groups and all eggs were counted and removed to an incubator to determine their viability.

Bottom Line: Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared.Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark.The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Although significant progress has been made using insect taxa as model organisms, non-tracheated terrestrial arthropods, such as Collembola, are underrepresented as model species. This underrepresentation reflects the difficulty in maintaining populations of specialist Collembola species in the laboratory. Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared. Here we use controlled growth experiments to provide explicit evidence that the species Neanura muscorum can be raised under laboratory conditions when its diet is supplemented with slime mould. Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark. These benefits are further highlighted by the reproductive success of the experimental group and persistence of laboratory breeding stocks of this species and others in the family. The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae. Maintaining laboratory populations of neanurid Collembola species will facilitate their use as model organisms, paving the way for studies that will broaden the current understanding of the environmental physiology of arthropods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus