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Growth and reproduction of laboratory-reared neanurid Collembola using a novel slime mould diet.

Hoskins JL, Janion-Scheepers C, Chown SL, Duffy GA - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared.Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark.The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Although significant progress has been made using insect taxa as model organisms, non-tracheated terrestrial arthropods, such as Collembola, are underrepresented as model species. This underrepresentation reflects the difficulty in maintaining populations of specialist Collembola species in the laboratory. Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared. Here we use controlled growth experiments to provide explicit evidence that the species Neanura muscorum can be raised under laboratory conditions when its diet is supplemented with slime mould. Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark. These benefits are further highlighted by the reproductive success of the experimental group and persistence of laboratory breeding stocks of this species and others in the family. The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae. Maintaining laboratory populations of neanurid Collembola species will facilitate their use as model organisms, paving the way for studies that will broaden the current understanding of the environmental physiology of arthropods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagrammatic representation of the experimental design used in this study.
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f1: Diagrammatic representation of the experimental design used in this study.

Mentions: Parental lines (F0) were provided with a combined diet of slime mould (Physarum polycephalum; cultured on 1.5% agarose media at 25 °C on a diet of oats) and algae-covered plane tree (Platanus sp.) bark ad libitum. The latter is a standard diet used in rearing other Collembola species, which enables individuals to select amongst a range of algae, cyanobacteria, and fungi to reach their optimal nutrient target121327. Collembola cultures were checked daily and eggs were removed to new containers and incubated in the temperature-controlled room until hatching. Four batches of first-generation (F1) eggs were used for experiments (Fig. 1). Subsequent clutches were combined and raised as a F1 breeding population under identical conditions to the parental line. Five batches of eggs laid by the F1 breeding population were then used to create F2 populations for a repetition of the experiments undertaken with the F1 generation (Fig. 1). Neanura muscorum F2 individuals that were not used for experimentation were pooled and kept as laboratory stocks. These stocks continue to be maintained on a combined slime mould and algae-covered plane tree bark diet.


Growth and reproduction of laboratory-reared neanurid Collembola using a novel slime mould diet.

Hoskins JL, Janion-Scheepers C, Chown SL, Duffy GA - Sci Rep (2015)

Diagrammatic representation of the experimental design used in this study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495557&req=5

f1: Diagrammatic representation of the experimental design used in this study.
Mentions: Parental lines (F0) were provided with a combined diet of slime mould (Physarum polycephalum; cultured on 1.5% agarose media at 25 °C on a diet of oats) and algae-covered plane tree (Platanus sp.) bark ad libitum. The latter is a standard diet used in rearing other Collembola species, which enables individuals to select amongst a range of algae, cyanobacteria, and fungi to reach their optimal nutrient target121327. Collembola cultures were checked daily and eggs were removed to new containers and incubated in the temperature-controlled room until hatching. Four batches of first-generation (F1) eggs were used for experiments (Fig. 1). Subsequent clutches were combined and raised as a F1 breeding population under identical conditions to the parental line. Five batches of eggs laid by the F1 breeding population were then used to create F2 populations for a repetition of the experiments undertaken with the F1 generation (Fig. 1). Neanura muscorum F2 individuals that were not used for experimentation were pooled and kept as laboratory stocks. These stocks continue to be maintained on a combined slime mould and algae-covered plane tree bark diet.

Bottom Line: Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared.Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark.The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Although significant progress has been made using insect taxa as model organisms, non-tracheated terrestrial arthropods, such as Collembola, are underrepresented as model species. This underrepresentation reflects the difficulty in maintaining populations of specialist Collembola species in the laboratory. Until now, no species from the family Neanuridae have been successfully reared. Here we use controlled growth experiments to provide explicit evidence that the species Neanura muscorum can be raised under laboratory conditions when its diet is supplemented with slime mould. Significant gains in growth were observed in Collembola given slime mould rather than a standard diet of algae-covered bark. These benefits are further highlighted by the reproductive success of the experimental group and persistence of laboratory breeding stocks of this species and others in the family. The necessity for slime mould in the diet is attributed to the 'suctorial' mouthpart morphology characteristic of the Neanuridae. Maintaining laboratory populations of neanurid Collembola species will facilitate their use as model organisms, paving the way for studies that will broaden the current understanding of the environmental physiology of arthropods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus