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Variation in Protein and Calorie Consumption Following Protein Malnutrition in Rattus norvegicus.

Jones DC, German RZ - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: We measured total and protein consumption, body mass, and long bone length, following an increase of dietary protein at 40, 60 and 90 days, with two control groups (chronic reduced protein or standard protein) for 150+ days.Immediately following rehabilitation, rats' food consumption decreased significantly, implying that elevated protein intake is sufficient to fuel catch-up growth rates that eventually result in body weights and long bone lengths greater or equal to final measures of chronically fed standard (CT) animals.While rehabilitated animals did compensate with greater protein consumption, variable responses in different ages and sex highlight the plasticity of growth and how nutrition affects body form.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plastic Surgery, ML 1020, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Donna.Jones1@cchmc.org.

ABSTRACT
Catch-up growth rates, following protein malnutrition, vary with timing and duration of insult, despite unlimited access to calories. Understanding changing patterns of post-insult consumption, relative rehabilitation timing, can provide insight into the mechanisms driving those differences. We hypothesize that higher catch-up growth rates will be correlated with increased protein consumption, while calorie consumption could remain stable. As catch-up growth rates decrease with age/malnutrition duration, we predict a dose effect in protein consumption with rehabilitation timing. We measured total and protein consumption, body mass, and long bone length, following an increase of dietary protein at 40, 60 and 90 days, with two control groups (chronic reduced protein or standard protein) for 150+ days. Immediately following rehabilitation, rats' food consumption decreased significantly, implying that elevated protein intake is sufficient to fuel catch-up growth rates that eventually result in body weights and long bone lengths greater or equal to final measures of chronically fed standard (CT) animals. The duration of protein restriction affected consumption: rats rehabilitated at younger ages had more drastic alterations in consumption of both calories and protein. While rehabilitated animals did compensate with greater protein consumption, variable responses in different ages and sex highlight the plasticity of growth and how nutrition affects body form.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Box plots, illustrating daily average calorie consumption (kCal/day) by body mass (g) for chronic CT, LP and rehabilitation animals for 10 days following diet alteration. Rehabilitation intervals encompass the following durations: 1 = animals aged 40–49 days, 2 = 60–69 days, and 3 = 90–99 days (all comparisons p ≤ 0.001, except between LP and rehabilitated males).
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animals-03-00033-f006: Box plots, illustrating daily average calorie consumption (kCal/day) by body mass (g) for chronic CT, LP and rehabilitation animals for 10 days following diet alteration. Rehabilitation intervals encompass the following durations: 1 = animals aged 40–49 days, 2 = 60–69 days, and 3 = 90–99 days (all comparisons p ≤ 0.001, except between LP and rehabilitated males).

Mentions: After the dietary transition, the three rehabilitated groups consumed more protein than all LP animals and in some cases CT animals as well (Figure 5). Specifically, rehabilitated males consumed more protein than age-matched CT individuals (all tests p ≤ 0.001), but rehabilitated females consumed an equal amount of protein per body mass than did age-matched CT females (p = 0.685). The response of calorie consumption was varied depending upon age and sex (Figure 6). Regardless of age or sex, LP animals consumed more calories than CT animals (all comparisons p ≤ 0.001). At rehabilitation males’ caloric intake was indistinguishable from LP amounts, but females immediately decreased their caloric consumption, and the magnitude of change decreases with age.


Variation in Protein and Calorie Consumption Following Protein Malnutrition in Rattus norvegicus.

Jones DC, German RZ - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Box plots, illustrating daily average calorie consumption (kCal/day) by body mass (g) for chronic CT, LP and rehabilitation animals for 10 days following diet alteration. Rehabilitation intervals encompass the following durations: 1 = animals aged 40–49 days, 2 = 60–69 days, and 3 = 90–99 days (all comparisons p ≤ 0.001, except between LP and rehabilitated males).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495520&req=5

animals-03-00033-f006: Box plots, illustrating daily average calorie consumption (kCal/day) by body mass (g) for chronic CT, LP and rehabilitation animals for 10 days following diet alteration. Rehabilitation intervals encompass the following durations: 1 = animals aged 40–49 days, 2 = 60–69 days, and 3 = 90–99 days (all comparisons p ≤ 0.001, except between LP and rehabilitated males).
Mentions: After the dietary transition, the three rehabilitated groups consumed more protein than all LP animals and in some cases CT animals as well (Figure 5). Specifically, rehabilitated males consumed more protein than age-matched CT individuals (all tests p ≤ 0.001), but rehabilitated females consumed an equal amount of protein per body mass than did age-matched CT females (p = 0.685). The response of calorie consumption was varied depending upon age and sex (Figure 6). Regardless of age or sex, LP animals consumed more calories than CT animals (all comparisons p ≤ 0.001). At rehabilitation males’ caloric intake was indistinguishable from LP amounts, but females immediately decreased their caloric consumption, and the magnitude of change decreases with age.

Bottom Line: We measured total and protein consumption, body mass, and long bone length, following an increase of dietary protein at 40, 60 and 90 days, with two control groups (chronic reduced protein or standard protein) for 150+ days.Immediately following rehabilitation, rats' food consumption decreased significantly, implying that elevated protein intake is sufficient to fuel catch-up growth rates that eventually result in body weights and long bone lengths greater or equal to final measures of chronically fed standard (CT) animals.While rehabilitated animals did compensate with greater protein consumption, variable responses in different ages and sex highlight the plasticity of growth and how nutrition affects body form.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Plastic Surgery, ML 1020, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA. Donna.Jones1@cchmc.org.

ABSTRACT
Catch-up growth rates, following protein malnutrition, vary with timing and duration of insult, despite unlimited access to calories. Understanding changing patterns of post-insult consumption, relative rehabilitation timing, can provide insight into the mechanisms driving those differences. We hypothesize that higher catch-up growth rates will be correlated with increased protein consumption, while calorie consumption could remain stable. As catch-up growth rates decrease with age/malnutrition duration, we predict a dose effect in protein consumption with rehabilitation timing. We measured total and protein consumption, body mass, and long bone length, following an increase of dietary protein at 40, 60 and 90 days, with two control groups (chronic reduced protein or standard protein) for 150+ days. Immediately following rehabilitation, rats' food consumption decreased significantly, implying that elevated protein intake is sufficient to fuel catch-up growth rates that eventually result in body weights and long bone lengths greater or equal to final measures of chronically fed standard (CT) animals. The duration of protein restriction affected consumption: rats rehabilitated at younger ages had more drastic alterations in consumption of both calories and protein. While rehabilitated animals did compensate with greater protein consumption, variable responses in different ages and sex highlight the plasticity of growth and how nutrition affects body form.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus