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Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Discomfort in Spay and Neuter Veterinarians.

White SC - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Although 94.4% of respondents felt that posture during surgery is important, only 30.6% had received any instruction in posture and positioning for surgery.Future interventions should aim to optimize surgical efficiency, surgeon work schedules, and working environment.Analysis and intervention studies are required to determine further causes of MSD in these veterinarians and develop interventions to prevent MSD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Spay ASAP Inc., Hartland, VT 05048, USA. swhitevt@mac.com.

ABSTRACT
A cross-sectional study to investigate musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) surveyed 219 veterinarians who currently or previously perform spays and neuters at least 4 hours per week. Participants were asked about the presence and severity of hand and body MSD during the previous month, whether MSD interfered with work or daily activities, whether they attributed their MSD to their spay/neuter work, and whether MSD had ever necessitated absence from work. The period prevalence of MSD was 99.1%, with 76.7% experiencing hand or wrist pain and 98.2% experiencing body pain. Hand discomfort was most commonly reported in the right thumb and/or thumb base (49.8%) and the right wrist (37.9%). Body discomfort was most commonly reported in the lower back (76.7%), shoulders (72.6%), and neck (71.7%). Increasing career length, increasing weekly hours in surgery and decreasing job satisfaction were the work-related factors with the greatest relative contribution accounting for variation in hand pain severity and total pain. Although 94.4% of respondents felt that posture during surgery is important, only 30.6% had received any instruction in posture and positioning for surgery. Future interventions should aim to optimize surgical efficiency, surgeon work schedules, and working environment. Analysis and intervention studies are required to determine further causes of MSD in these veterinarians and develop interventions to prevent MSD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of participants experiencing MSD of any region of the hands and wrists in the past month of spay-neuter work (Hand images used with permission of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory at Cornell University).
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animals-03-00085-f001: Percentage of participants experiencing MSD of any region of the hands and wrists in the past month of spay-neuter work (Hand images used with permission of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory at Cornell University).

Mentions: The self-reported period prevalence of MSD was 99.1%, with 217 of 219 participants reporting pain. Of these, 168 (76.7%) reported hand pain, 215 (98.2%) reported body pain, and 121 (55.3%) reported headaches. The reported pain affected daily activities for 168 (67.6%) of participants. In the hands, the most commonly reported areas of MSD were the right wrist (37.9%), the right distal thumb (first proximal and distal phalangeal area; 37%), and the right thumb base (first metacarpal area; 34.7%) (Figure 1). MSD was reported in some portion of the right thumb [phalangeal and metacarpal areas] by 49.8% of participants. Body MSD was most commonly reported in the lower back (76.7%), shoulders (72.6%), and neck (71.7%) (Figure 2).


Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with Musculoskeletal Discomfort in Spay and Neuter Veterinarians.

White SC - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Percentage of participants experiencing MSD of any region of the hands and wrists in the past month of spay-neuter work (Hand images used with permission of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory at Cornell University).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495518&req=5

animals-03-00085-f001: Percentage of participants experiencing MSD of any region of the hands and wrists in the past month of spay-neuter work (Hand images used with permission of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory at Cornell University).
Mentions: The self-reported period prevalence of MSD was 99.1%, with 217 of 219 participants reporting pain. Of these, 168 (76.7%) reported hand pain, 215 (98.2%) reported body pain, and 121 (55.3%) reported headaches. The reported pain affected daily activities for 168 (67.6%) of participants. In the hands, the most commonly reported areas of MSD were the right wrist (37.9%), the right distal thumb (first proximal and distal phalangeal area; 37%), and the right thumb base (first metacarpal area; 34.7%) (Figure 1). MSD was reported in some portion of the right thumb [phalangeal and metacarpal areas] by 49.8% of participants. Body MSD was most commonly reported in the lower back (76.7%), shoulders (72.6%), and neck (71.7%) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Although 94.4% of respondents felt that posture during surgery is important, only 30.6% had received any instruction in posture and positioning for surgery.Future interventions should aim to optimize surgical efficiency, surgeon work schedules, and working environment.Analysis and intervention studies are required to determine further causes of MSD in these veterinarians and develop interventions to prevent MSD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Spay ASAP Inc., Hartland, VT 05048, USA. swhitevt@mac.com.

ABSTRACT
A cross-sectional study to investigate musculoskeletal discomfort (MSD) surveyed 219 veterinarians who currently or previously perform spays and neuters at least 4 hours per week. Participants were asked about the presence and severity of hand and body MSD during the previous month, whether MSD interfered with work or daily activities, whether they attributed their MSD to their spay/neuter work, and whether MSD had ever necessitated absence from work. The period prevalence of MSD was 99.1%, with 76.7% experiencing hand or wrist pain and 98.2% experiencing body pain. Hand discomfort was most commonly reported in the right thumb and/or thumb base (49.8%) and the right wrist (37.9%). Body discomfort was most commonly reported in the lower back (76.7%), shoulders (72.6%), and neck (71.7%). Increasing career length, increasing weekly hours in surgery and decreasing job satisfaction were the work-related factors with the greatest relative contribution accounting for variation in hand pain severity and total pain. Although 94.4% of respondents felt that posture during surgery is important, only 30.6% had received any instruction in posture and positioning for surgery. Future interventions should aim to optimize surgical efficiency, surgeon work schedules, and working environment. Analysis and intervention studies are required to determine further causes of MSD in these veterinarians and develop interventions to prevent MSD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus