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The "Super Chimpanzee": The Ecological Dimensions of Rehabilitation of Orphan Chimpanzees in Guinea, West Africa.

Ongman L, Colin C, Raballand E, Humle T - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Bottom Line: Behavioral data focused on foraging skills and activity budget.During bush-outings, rehabilitants spent on average nearly a quarter of their activity budget foraging, resting or traveling, respectively.This "Super Chimpanzee" theory opens up new questions about cultural transmission and socially-biased learning among our closest living relatives and provides a novel outlook on rehabilitation in chimpanzees.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DICE, School of Anthropology and Conservation, Marlowe Building, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NR, UK. lissaongman@googlemail.com.

ABSTRACT
To date few studies, especially among non-human primates, have evaluated or monitored rehabilitation effectiveness and identified key species-specific behavioral indicators for release success. This four-months study aimed to identify behavioral indicators of rehabilitation success among ten infant and juvenile orphaned chimpanzees cared for in peer groups at the Centre for Conservation of Chimpanzees (CCC), Guinea, West Africa. Behavioral data focused on foraging skills and activity budget. During bush-outings, rehabilitants spent on average nearly a quarter of their activity budget foraging, resting or traveling, respectively. Neither age, sex, the level of abnormal behaviors demonstrated upon arrival nor human contact during bush-outings predicted individual dietary knowledge. However, individuals who spent more time arboreal demonstrated a greater dietary breadth than conspecifics who dwelled more terrestrially. Although our data failed to demonstrate a role of conspecific observation in dietary acquisition, we propose that the mingling of individuals from different geographical origins may act as a catalyst for acquiring new dietary knowledge, promoted by ecological opportunities offered during bush-outings. This "Super Chimpanzee" theory opens up new questions about cultural transmission and socially-biased learning among our closest living relatives and provides a novel outlook on rehabilitation in chimpanzees.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of food parts consumed (n = 63) during bush-outings during the four-month study period.
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animals-03-00109-f003: Percentage of food parts consumed (n = 63) during bush-outings during the four-month study period.

Mentions: During this study, subjects consumed an individual mean of 27 ± 4.3 food items. The mean individual percentage of food items located and ingested in trees was 82 ± 6.5%. Data from focal follows revealed that the subjects of this study consumed altogether 46 different species including 63 different food items during the four-month study period (for full list see Table 4). The highest percentage of food parts consumed included fruit, leaves and flowers (33%, 19% and 13%, respectively); roots, insects and honey contributed the least to their overall dietary repertoire (Figure 3). The Univariate GLM model examined the influence of mean ABS, age, sex, as well as the percentage of time spent arboreal, in human contact, and observing conspecifics foraging upon individual variation in dietary knowledge. Only the percentage time spent arboreal emerged as significant (GLM: F1,10 = 10.27, p = 0.049).


The "Super Chimpanzee": The Ecological Dimensions of Rehabilitation of Orphan Chimpanzees in Guinea, West Africa.

Ongman L, Colin C, Raballand E, Humle T - Animals (Basel) (2013)

Percentage of food parts consumed (n = 63) during bush-outings during the four-month study period.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495513&req=5

animals-03-00109-f003: Percentage of food parts consumed (n = 63) during bush-outings during the four-month study period.
Mentions: During this study, subjects consumed an individual mean of 27 ± 4.3 food items. The mean individual percentage of food items located and ingested in trees was 82 ± 6.5%. Data from focal follows revealed that the subjects of this study consumed altogether 46 different species including 63 different food items during the four-month study period (for full list see Table 4). The highest percentage of food parts consumed included fruit, leaves and flowers (33%, 19% and 13%, respectively); roots, insects and honey contributed the least to their overall dietary repertoire (Figure 3). The Univariate GLM model examined the influence of mean ABS, age, sex, as well as the percentage of time spent arboreal, in human contact, and observing conspecifics foraging upon individual variation in dietary knowledge. Only the percentage time spent arboreal emerged as significant (GLM: F1,10 = 10.27, p = 0.049).

Bottom Line: Behavioral data focused on foraging skills and activity budget.During bush-outings, rehabilitants spent on average nearly a quarter of their activity budget foraging, resting or traveling, respectively.This "Super Chimpanzee" theory opens up new questions about cultural transmission and socially-biased learning among our closest living relatives and provides a novel outlook on rehabilitation in chimpanzees.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: DICE, School of Anthropology and Conservation, Marlowe Building, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NR, UK. lissaongman@googlemail.com.

ABSTRACT
To date few studies, especially among non-human primates, have evaluated or monitored rehabilitation effectiveness and identified key species-specific behavioral indicators for release success. This four-months study aimed to identify behavioral indicators of rehabilitation success among ten infant and juvenile orphaned chimpanzees cared for in peer groups at the Centre for Conservation of Chimpanzees (CCC), Guinea, West Africa. Behavioral data focused on foraging skills and activity budget. During bush-outings, rehabilitants spent on average nearly a quarter of their activity budget foraging, resting or traveling, respectively. Neither age, sex, the level of abnormal behaviors demonstrated upon arrival nor human contact during bush-outings predicted individual dietary knowledge. However, individuals who spent more time arboreal demonstrated a greater dietary breadth than conspecifics who dwelled more terrestrially. Although our data failed to demonstrate a role of conspecific observation in dietary acquisition, we propose that the mingling of individuals from different geographical origins may act as a catalyst for acquiring new dietary knowledge, promoted by ecological opportunities offered during bush-outings. This "Super Chimpanzee" theory opens up new questions about cultural transmission and socially-biased learning among our closest living relatives and provides a novel outlook on rehabilitation in chimpanzees.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus