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Socioeconomic rehabilitation of successful renal transplant patients and impact of funding source: Indian scenario.

Kapoor R, Sharma RK, Srivastava A, Kapoor R, Arora S, Sureka SK - Indian J Urol (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: Patients with follow up of at least 1 year after successful renal transplant were included.Significant correlation was found (R = 0.715) between baseline socioeconomic strata and changes in SES after transplant. 70% of the patients with upper and upper middle class status had improving SES.Most of the recipients from middle and lower social strata, which included more than 65% of our patient's population, had deteriorating SES even after a successful transplant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Socio-economic rehabilitation is an important outcome parameter in successful renal transplant recipients, particularly in developing countries with low income patients who often depend on extraneous sources to fund their surgery costs. We studied the socioeconomic rehabilitation and changes in socioeconomic status (SES) of successful renal allograft recipients among Indian patients and its correlation with their source of funding for the surgery.

Materials and method: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted on 183 patients between January 2010 to January 2013. Patients with follow up of at least 1 year after successful renal transplant were included. During interview, two questionnaires were administered, one related to the SES including source of funding before transplantation and another one relating to the same at time of interview. Changes in SES were categorized as improvement, stable and deterioration if post-transplant SES score increased >5%, increased or decreased by <5% and decreased >5% of pre-transplant value, respectively.

Results: In this cohort, 97 (52.7%), 67 (36.4%) and 19 (10.3%) patients were non-funded (self-funded), one-time funded and continuous funded, respectively. Fifty-six (30.4%) recipients had improvement in SES, whereas 89 (48.4%) and 38 (20.7%) recipients had deterioration and stable SES. Improvement in SES was seen in 68% patients with continuous funding support whereas, in only 36% and 12% patients with non-funded and onetime funding support (P = 0.001) respectively. Significant correlation was found (R = 0.715) between baseline socioeconomic strata and changes in SES after transplant. 70% of the patients with upper and upper middle class status had improving SES. Patients with middle class, lower middle and lower class had deterioration of SES after transplant in 47.4%, 79.6% and 66.7% patients, respectively.

Conclusions: Most of the recipients from middle and lower social strata, which included more than 65% of our patient's population, had deteriorating SES even after a successful transplant. One-time funding source for transplant had significant negative impact on SES and rehabilitation.

No MeSH data available.


Changes in SES in correlation with pre-transplant socioeconomic class
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Figure 2: Changes in SES in correlation with pre-transplant socioeconomic class

Mentions: Fifty-six (30.4%) recipients had improvement in SES, whereas 89 (48.4%) recipients had deterioration in SES. With continuous funding support, 68% had improvement in SES, whereas only 36% and 12% of non-funded and one-time funded patients (P = 0.000, R = 0.812) showed improvement in SES [Figure 1]. On subgroup analysis, there was significant correlation (R = 0.769) between baseline social strata and SES after transplant [Figure 2]. 70% of the patients of upper and upper middle class had improving SES. Patients with middle class, lower middle and lower class had deterioration of SES after transplant in 47.4%, 79.6% and 66.7% of the patients, respectively. There was significant association (P = 0.012) and positive correlation (R = 0.581) between the educational qualification and changes in SES [Table 2, Figure 3].


Socioeconomic rehabilitation of successful renal transplant patients and impact of funding source: Indian scenario.

Kapoor R, Sharma RK, Srivastava A, Kapoor R, Arora S, Sureka SK - Indian J Urol (2015 Jul-Sep)

Changes in SES in correlation with pre-transplant socioeconomic class
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495499&req=5

Figure 2: Changes in SES in correlation with pre-transplant socioeconomic class
Mentions: Fifty-six (30.4%) recipients had improvement in SES, whereas 89 (48.4%) recipients had deterioration in SES. With continuous funding support, 68% had improvement in SES, whereas only 36% and 12% of non-funded and one-time funded patients (P = 0.000, R = 0.812) showed improvement in SES [Figure 1]. On subgroup analysis, there was significant correlation (R = 0.769) between baseline social strata and SES after transplant [Figure 2]. 70% of the patients of upper and upper middle class had improving SES. Patients with middle class, lower middle and lower class had deterioration of SES after transplant in 47.4%, 79.6% and 66.7% of the patients, respectively. There was significant association (P = 0.012) and positive correlation (R = 0.581) between the educational qualification and changes in SES [Table 2, Figure 3].

Bottom Line: Patients with follow up of at least 1 year after successful renal transplant were included.Significant correlation was found (R = 0.715) between baseline socioeconomic strata and changes in SES after transplant. 70% of the patients with upper and upper middle class status had improving SES.Most of the recipients from middle and lower social strata, which included more than 65% of our patient's population, had deteriorating SES even after a successful transplant.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology and Renal Transplantation, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Socio-economic rehabilitation is an important outcome parameter in successful renal transplant recipients, particularly in developing countries with low income patients who often depend on extraneous sources to fund their surgery costs. We studied the socioeconomic rehabilitation and changes in socioeconomic status (SES) of successful renal allograft recipients among Indian patients and its correlation with their source of funding for the surgery.

Materials and method: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study was conducted on 183 patients between January 2010 to January 2013. Patients with follow up of at least 1 year after successful renal transplant were included. During interview, two questionnaires were administered, one related to the SES including source of funding before transplantation and another one relating to the same at time of interview. Changes in SES were categorized as improvement, stable and deterioration if post-transplant SES score increased >5%, increased or decreased by <5% and decreased >5% of pre-transplant value, respectively.

Results: In this cohort, 97 (52.7%), 67 (36.4%) and 19 (10.3%) patients were non-funded (self-funded), one-time funded and continuous funded, respectively. Fifty-six (30.4%) recipients had improvement in SES, whereas 89 (48.4%) and 38 (20.7%) recipients had deterioration and stable SES. Improvement in SES was seen in 68% patients with continuous funding support whereas, in only 36% and 12% patients with non-funded and onetime funding support (P = 0.001) respectively. Significant correlation was found (R = 0.715) between baseline socioeconomic strata and changes in SES after transplant. 70% of the patients with upper and upper middle class status had improving SES. Patients with middle class, lower middle and lower class had deterioration of SES after transplant in 47.4%, 79.6% and 66.7% patients, respectively.

Conclusions: Most of the recipients from middle and lower social strata, which included more than 65% of our patient's population, had deteriorating SES even after a successful transplant. One-time funding source for transplant had significant negative impact on SES and rehabilitation.

No MeSH data available.