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Image-guided urological interventions: What the urologists must know.

Das CJ, Baliyan V, Sharma S - Indian J Urol (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology.Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation.This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110 029, India.

ABSTRACT
Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology. While the traditional biopsy and drainage techniques are firmly established, image-based stone management and endovascular management of hematuria have evolved further. Ablative techniques for renal and prostate cancer and prostate artery embolization for benign prostatic hypertrophy have evolved into viable alternative treatments. Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation. This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Right renal mass seen as a hypodense lesion that was visualized better with the use of intravenous contrast (a) (arrow). It was targeted using CT-guided biopsy (b). It turned out to be a non-Hodgkins lymphoma
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Figure 2: Right renal mass seen as a hypodense lesion that was visualized better with the use of intravenous contrast (a) (arrow). It was targeted using CT-guided biopsy (b). It turned out to be a non-Hodgkins lymphoma

Mentions: Biopsy of renal masses: The purpose is to save these patients from unnecessary nephrectomies. Large enhancing renal masses are considered to be renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and are therefore operated without a biopsy. However, smaller, indeterminate masses are now often biopsied as many of them are thought to be benign. Such indications are rising due to the increased detection of small renal masses due to widespread use of cross-sectional imaging. Renal mass biopsy is also considered prior to a percutaneous thermal (radiofrequency/cryo) ablation, when it is suspected to be infective, in borderline surgical candidates or sometimes to differentiate a concurrent renal cancer from a metastasis in known primary extra-renal malignancy. Renal mass biopsy may be performed under CT or USG guidance. If the mass is not visible on a non-contrast CT scan, it may be demonstrated following administration of intravenous iodinated contrast [Figure 2]. The mass is first approached using a 17 G cannula into which an 18 G coaxial biopsy needle or gun is introduced to obtain several cores. The use of a co-axial system allows multiple samples to be taken by only one puncture of the renal capsule.


Image-guided urological interventions: What the urologists must know.

Das CJ, Baliyan V, Sharma S - Indian J Urol (2015 Jul-Sep)

Right renal mass seen as a hypodense lesion that was visualized better with the use of intravenous contrast (a) (arrow). It was targeted using CT-guided biopsy (b). It turned out to be a non-Hodgkins lymphoma
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495494&req=5

Figure 2: Right renal mass seen as a hypodense lesion that was visualized better with the use of intravenous contrast (a) (arrow). It was targeted using CT-guided biopsy (b). It turned out to be a non-Hodgkins lymphoma
Mentions: Biopsy of renal masses: The purpose is to save these patients from unnecessary nephrectomies. Large enhancing renal masses are considered to be renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and are therefore operated without a biopsy. However, smaller, indeterminate masses are now often biopsied as many of them are thought to be benign. Such indications are rising due to the increased detection of small renal masses due to widespread use of cross-sectional imaging. Renal mass biopsy is also considered prior to a percutaneous thermal (radiofrequency/cryo) ablation, when it is suspected to be infective, in borderline surgical candidates or sometimes to differentiate a concurrent renal cancer from a metastasis in known primary extra-renal malignancy. Renal mass biopsy may be performed under CT or USG guidance. If the mass is not visible on a non-contrast CT scan, it may be demonstrated following administration of intravenous iodinated contrast [Figure 2]. The mass is first approached using a 17 G cannula into which an 18 G coaxial biopsy needle or gun is introduced to obtain several cores. The use of a co-axial system allows multiple samples to be taken by only one puncture of the renal capsule.

Bottom Line: Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology.Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation.This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110 029, India.

ABSTRACT
Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology. While the traditional biopsy and drainage techniques are firmly established, image-based stone management and endovascular management of hematuria have evolved further. Ablative techniques for renal and prostate cancer and prostate artery embolization for benign prostatic hypertrophy have evolved into viable alternative treatments. Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation. This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus