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Image-guided urological interventions: What the urologists must know.

Das CJ, Baliyan V, Sharma S - Indian J Urol (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology.Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation.This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110 029, India.

ABSTRACT
Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology. While the traditional biopsy and drainage techniques are firmly established, image-based stone management and endovascular management of hematuria have evolved further. Ablative techniques for renal and prostate cancer and prostate artery embolization for benign prostatic hypertrophy have evolved into viable alternative treatments. Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation. This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultrasound-guided biopsy from the renal parenchyma. The renal cortex is being targeted with a coaxial needle (arrow) from the posterior paravertebral approach with the patient in prone oblique position
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Figure 1: Ultrasound-guided biopsy from the renal parenchyma. The renal cortex is being targeted with a coaxial needle (arrow) from the posterior paravertebral approach with the patient in prone oblique position

Mentions: Non-focal renal biopsy: Indicated for histological characterization of renal parenchymal diseases, renal grafts suspicious for rejection or unexplained renal failure. After placing the patient in the appropriate position (supine for transplant and prone or prone oblique with target side dependent for native kidneys), the biopsy needle (15–18 G) is advanced obliquely into the renal cortex near the lower pole [Figure 1]. The cortical sample ensures that the specimen contains a few glomeruli necessary to make a diagnosis. Puncture of the renal medulla or renal sinus must be avoided.


Image-guided urological interventions: What the urologists must know.

Das CJ, Baliyan V, Sharma S - Indian J Urol (2015 Jul-Sep)

Ultrasound-guided biopsy from the renal parenchyma. The renal cortex is being targeted with a coaxial needle (arrow) from the posterior paravertebral approach with the patient in prone oblique position
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495494&req=5

Figure 1: Ultrasound-guided biopsy from the renal parenchyma. The renal cortex is being targeted with a coaxial needle (arrow) from the posterior paravertebral approach with the patient in prone oblique position
Mentions: Non-focal renal biopsy: Indicated for histological characterization of renal parenchymal diseases, renal grafts suspicious for rejection or unexplained renal failure. After placing the patient in the appropriate position (supine for transplant and prone or prone oblique with target side dependent for native kidneys), the biopsy needle (15–18 G) is advanced obliquely into the renal cortex near the lower pole [Figure 1]. The cortical sample ensures that the specimen contains a few glomeruli necessary to make a diagnosis. Puncture of the renal medulla or renal sinus must be avoided.

Bottom Line: Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology.Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation.This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110 029, India.

ABSTRACT
Advances in imaging technology, especially in the last two decades, have led to a paradigm shift in the field of image-guided interventions in urology. While the traditional biopsy and drainage techniques are firmly established, image-based stone management and endovascular management of hematuria have evolved further. Ablative techniques for renal and prostate cancer and prostate artery embolization for benign prostatic hypertrophy have evolved into viable alternative treatments. Many urologic diseases that were earlier treated surgically are now effectively managed using minimally invasive image-guided techniques, often on a day care basis using only local anesthesia or conscious sedation. This article presents an overview of the technique and status of various image-guided urological procedures, including recent emerging techniques.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus