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Multiparametric-MRI in diagnosis of prostate cancer.

Ghai S, Haider MA - Indian J Urol (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: Multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has shown promising results in diagnosis, localization, risk stratification and staging of clinically significant prostate cancer.It has also opened up opportunities for focal treatment of prostate cancer.This review focuses on the present status of mp-MRI in prostate cancer and its evolving role in the management of prostate cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has shown promising results in diagnosis, localization, risk stratification and staging of clinically significant prostate cancer. It has also opened up opportunities for focal treatment of prostate cancer. Combinations of T2-weighted imaging, diffusion imaging, perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging) and spectroscopic imaging have been used in mp-MRI assessment of prostate cancer, but T2 morphologic assessment and functional assessment by diffusion imaging remains the mainstay for prostate cancer diagnosis on mp-MRI. Because assessment on mp-MRI can be subjective, use of the newly developed standardized reporting Prostate Imaging and Reporting Archiving Data System scoring system and education of specialist radiologists are essential for accurate interpretation. This review focuses on the present status of mp-MRI in prostate cancer and its evolving role in the management of prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 55-year-old man with Gleason 7 (4 + 3) prostate cancer. (a) Axial T2-weighted image (T2WI) shows the normal hyperintense T2 signal in the peripheral zone (white arrow) from the high water content with cancer (black arrow) appearing as an area of low signal on T2WI. (b) Apparent diffusion coefficient map at the same level showing low signal from the restricted diffusion at the site of cancer (arrow)
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Figure 1: A 55-year-old man with Gleason 7 (4 + 3) prostate cancer. (a) Axial T2-weighted image (T2WI) shows the normal hyperintense T2 signal in the peripheral zone (white arrow) from the high water content with cancer (black arrow) appearing as an area of low signal on T2WI. (b) Apparent diffusion coefficient map at the same level showing low signal from the restricted diffusion at the site of cancer (arrow)

Mentions: T2-WI is the workhorse of prostate MRI. It provides high spatial resolution and defines the zonal anatomy differentiating the peripheral zone from the transition zone, the central zone, ejaculatory ducts, anterior fibromuscular stroma, seminal vesicles and the urethra.[15] The neurovascular bundles are also outlined on T2WI. The peripheral zone has high signal intensity on T2WI, reflecting its higher water content, and cancer in the peripheral zone appears as an area of lower signal [Figure 1a]. However, low T2 signal in the peripheral zone may also be seen in benign abnormalities, including prostatitis, fibrosis, scar tissue, post-biopsy hemorrhage or post-irradiation.


Multiparametric-MRI in diagnosis of prostate cancer.

Ghai S, Haider MA - Indian J Urol (2015 Jul-Sep)

A 55-year-old man with Gleason 7 (4 + 3) prostate cancer. (a) Axial T2-weighted image (T2WI) shows the normal hyperintense T2 signal in the peripheral zone (white arrow) from the high water content with cancer (black arrow) appearing as an area of low signal on T2WI. (b) Apparent diffusion coefficient map at the same level showing low signal from the restricted diffusion at the site of cancer (arrow)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495493&req=5

Figure 1: A 55-year-old man with Gleason 7 (4 + 3) prostate cancer. (a) Axial T2-weighted image (T2WI) shows the normal hyperintense T2 signal in the peripheral zone (white arrow) from the high water content with cancer (black arrow) appearing as an area of low signal on T2WI. (b) Apparent diffusion coefficient map at the same level showing low signal from the restricted diffusion at the site of cancer (arrow)
Mentions: T2-WI is the workhorse of prostate MRI. It provides high spatial resolution and defines the zonal anatomy differentiating the peripheral zone from the transition zone, the central zone, ejaculatory ducts, anterior fibromuscular stroma, seminal vesicles and the urethra.[15] The neurovascular bundles are also outlined on T2WI. The peripheral zone has high signal intensity on T2WI, reflecting its higher water content, and cancer in the peripheral zone appears as an area of lower signal [Figure 1a]. However, low T2 signal in the peripheral zone may also be seen in benign abnormalities, including prostatitis, fibrosis, scar tissue, post-biopsy hemorrhage or post-irradiation.

Bottom Line: Multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has shown promising results in diagnosis, localization, risk stratification and staging of clinically significant prostate cancer.It has also opened up opportunities for focal treatment of prostate cancer.This review focuses on the present status of mp-MRI in prostate cancer and its evolving role in the management of prostate cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has shown promising results in diagnosis, localization, risk stratification and staging of clinically significant prostate cancer. It has also opened up opportunities for focal treatment of prostate cancer. Combinations of T2-weighted imaging, diffusion imaging, perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging) and spectroscopic imaging have been used in mp-MRI assessment of prostate cancer, but T2 morphologic assessment and functional assessment by diffusion imaging remains the mainstay for prostate cancer diagnosis on mp-MRI. Because assessment on mp-MRI can be subjective, use of the newly developed standardized reporting Prostate Imaging and Reporting Archiving Data System scoring system and education of specialist radiologists are essential for accurate interpretation. This review focuses on the present status of mp-MRI in prostate cancer and its evolving role in the management of prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus