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Systemic Metabolomic Changes in Blood Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Identified by Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

Miyamoto S, Taylor SL, Barupal DK, Taguchi A, Wohlgemuth G, Wikoff WR, Yoneda KY, Gandara DR, Hanash SM, Kim K, Fiehn O - Metabolites (2015)

Bottom Line: Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05).Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased.Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology/Oncology, UC Davis Cancer Center, 4501 X Street, Room 3016, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. smiyamoto@ucdavis.edu.

ABSTRACT
Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Metabolic alterations in tumor cells coupled with systemic indicators of the host response to tumor development have the potential to yield blood profiles with clinical utility for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. We report results from two separate studies using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) to profile metabolites in human blood samples that significantly differ from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) adenocarcinoma and other lung cancer cases. Metabolomic analysis of blood samples from the two studies yielded a total of 437 metabolites, of which 148 were identified as known compounds and 289 identified as unknown compounds. Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05). Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased. Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Box-whisker plots of top metabolite candidates in Study 1 and Study 2 with additional plots of the same metabolites from each study separated by gender (males and females). Box-whisker plots of gender adjusted intensities of top known metabolite candidates from Study 1 (S1) compared with the same compounds in Study 2 (S2) for cancer cases (C) and normal/control (N) showing similarity in the changes in both studies are shown for nine of the top metabolites: maltose, ethanolamine, glycerol, palmitic acid, lactic acid, tryptophan, lysine, histidine and glutamic acid. Shown below each metabolite plot are results for the same metabolites separated by gender. Blue plots denotes male results only and red plots denote females results only for each study.
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metabolites-05-00192-f001: Box-whisker plots of top metabolite candidates in Study 1 and Study 2 with additional plots of the same metabolites from each study separated by gender (males and females). Box-whisker plots of gender adjusted intensities of top known metabolite candidates from Study 1 (S1) compared with the same compounds in Study 2 (S2) for cancer cases (C) and normal/control (N) showing similarity in the changes in both studies are shown for nine of the top metabolites: maltose, ethanolamine, glycerol, palmitic acid, lactic acid, tryptophan, lysine, histidine and glutamic acid. Shown below each metabolite plot are results for the same metabolites separated by gender. Blue plots denotes male results only and red plots denote females results only for each study.

Mentions: Box-plots comparing the mean intensities of 9 of the top candidate metabolites for all samples listed in Table 2A,B from Study 1 and Study 2 are shown in Figure 1. Also shown in Figure 1 are additional box plots to show a comparison between results from males (blue) and females (red) for the two studies. These plots show the same trends (increased or decreased) as all samples with the exception of glutamic acid, which shows the same trend for females, but not for males. This striking similarity between the studies is notable, especially since both studies were quite small and involved differences in the matrix (plasma and serum), dealt with different types of lung cancers and originated from different clinics. Overall, we concluded that it is possible to compare the two studies and still find evidence of an increase in glycolysis and lipid biosynthesis in blood samples, along with a general decrease in aromatic amino acids.


Systemic Metabolomic Changes in Blood Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Identified by Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

Miyamoto S, Taylor SL, Barupal DK, Taguchi A, Wohlgemuth G, Wikoff WR, Yoneda KY, Gandara DR, Hanash SM, Kim K, Fiehn O - Metabolites (2015)

Box-whisker plots of top metabolite candidates in Study 1 and Study 2 with additional plots of the same metabolites from each study separated by gender (males and females). Box-whisker plots of gender adjusted intensities of top known metabolite candidates from Study 1 (S1) compared with the same compounds in Study 2 (S2) for cancer cases (C) and normal/control (N) showing similarity in the changes in both studies are shown for nine of the top metabolites: maltose, ethanolamine, glycerol, palmitic acid, lactic acid, tryptophan, lysine, histidine and glutamic acid. Shown below each metabolite plot are results for the same metabolites separated by gender. Blue plots denotes male results only and red plots denote females results only for each study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495369&req=5

metabolites-05-00192-f001: Box-whisker plots of top metabolite candidates in Study 1 and Study 2 with additional plots of the same metabolites from each study separated by gender (males and females). Box-whisker plots of gender adjusted intensities of top known metabolite candidates from Study 1 (S1) compared with the same compounds in Study 2 (S2) for cancer cases (C) and normal/control (N) showing similarity in the changes in both studies are shown for nine of the top metabolites: maltose, ethanolamine, glycerol, palmitic acid, lactic acid, tryptophan, lysine, histidine and glutamic acid. Shown below each metabolite plot are results for the same metabolites separated by gender. Blue plots denotes male results only and red plots denote females results only for each study.
Mentions: Box-plots comparing the mean intensities of 9 of the top candidate metabolites for all samples listed in Table 2A,B from Study 1 and Study 2 are shown in Figure 1. Also shown in Figure 1 are additional box plots to show a comparison between results from males (blue) and females (red) for the two studies. These plots show the same trends (increased or decreased) as all samples with the exception of glutamic acid, which shows the same trend for females, but not for males. This striking similarity between the studies is notable, especially since both studies were quite small and involved differences in the matrix (plasma and serum), dealt with different types of lung cancers and originated from different clinics. Overall, we concluded that it is possible to compare the two studies and still find evidence of an increase in glycolysis and lipid biosynthesis in blood samples, along with a general decrease in aromatic amino acids.

Bottom Line: Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05).Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased.Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Hematology/Oncology, UC Davis Cancer Center, 4501 X Street, Room 3016, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. smiyamoto@ucdavis.edu.

ABSTRACT
Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Metabolic alterations in tumor cells coupled with systemic indicators of the host response to tumor development have the potential to yield blood profiles with clinical utility for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. We report results from two separate studies using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) to profile metabolites in human blood samples that significantly differ from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) adenocarcinoma and other lung cancer cases. Metabolomic analysis of blood samples from the two studies yielded a total of 437 metabolites, of which 148 were identified as known compounds and 289 identified as unknown compounds. Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05). Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased. Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus