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Gray matter blood flow and volume are reduced in association with white matter hyperintensity lesion burden: a cross-sectional MRI study.

Crane DE, Black SE, Ganda A, Mikulis DJ, Nestor SM, Donahue MJ, MacIntosh BJ - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: WMH have primarily been associated with global white matter and gray matter (GM) changes and less is known about regional effects in GM.The visual rating scale corroborated the regression findings (corrected p < 0.05).WMH lesion volume was associated with intra-group GM CBF and structural differences in this cohort of WMH adults with mild to severe lesion burden.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Heart and Stroke Foundation Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Research Institute Toronto, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Cerebral White Matter Hyperintensities (WMH) are associated with vascular risk factors and age-related cognitive decline. WMH have primarily been associated with global white matter and gray matter (GM) changes and less is known about regional effects in GM. The purpose of this study was to test for an association between WMH and two GM imaging measures: cerebral blood flow (CBF) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Twenty-six elderly adults with mild to severe WMH participated in this cross-sectional 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. MRI measures of GM CBF and VBM were derived from arterial spin labeling (ASL) and T1-weighted images, respectively. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were used to quantify the WMH lesion burden (mL). GM CBF and VBM data were used as dependent variables. WMH lesion burden, age and sex were used in a regression model. Visual rating of WMH with the Fazekas method was used to compare the WMH lesion volume regression approach. WMH volume was normally distributed for this group (mean volume of 22.7 mL, range: 2.2-70.6 mL). CBF analysis revealed negative associations between WMH volume and CBF in the left anterior putamen, subcallosal, accumbens, anterior caudate, orbital frontal, anterior insula, and frontal pole (corrected p < 0.05). VBM analysis revealed negative associations between WMH and GM volume in lingual gyrus, intracalcarine, and bilateral hippocampus (corrected p < 0.05). The visual rating scale corroborated the regression findings (corrected p < 0.05). WMH lesion volume was associated with intra-group GM CBF and structural differences in this cohort of WMH adults with mild to severe lesion burden.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Top row: mean CBF image of the group. Bottom row: Results of a voxel-wise analysis of CBF vs. WMH volume shows decreased perfusion with increasing disease burden, signified by the blue voxels (p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons, age and sex). The gray scale anatomical image is the ICBM-152 template in radiological convention.
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Figure 2: Top row: mean CBF image of the group. Bottom row: Results of a voxel-wise analysis of CBF vs. WMH volume shows decreased perfusion with increasing disease burden, signified by the blue voxels (p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons, age and sex). The gray scale anatomical image is the ICBM-152 template in radiological convention.

Mentions: Voxel-wise analysis of the CBF data revealed a negative relationship between WMH volume and CBF in the left anterior putamen, subcallosal, accumbens, anterior caudate, orbital frontal, anterior insula, and frontal pole (p < 0.05, corrected for age and sex). Refer to Figure 2 for a map of the significant voxels and Table 2 for MNI coordinates and cluster size. Figure 3 shows the result of the VBM, indicating there was a significant negative relationship between WMH volume and GM estimates in lingual gyrus, intracalcarine, and bilateral hippocampi (p < 0.05, corrected, Table 2). Table 2 shows the association results between the regional CBF values and the Fazekas score.


Gray matter blood flow and volume are reduced in association with white matter hyperintensity lesion burden: a cross-sectional MRI study.

Crane DE, Black SE, Ganda A, Mikulis DJ, Nestor SM, Donahue MJ, MacIntosh BJ - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Top row: mean CBF image of the group. Bottom row: Results of a voxel-wise analysis of CBF vs. WMH volume shows decreased perfusion with increasing disease burden, signified by the blue voxels (p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons, age and sex). The gray scale anatomical image is the ICBM-152 template in radiological convention.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495336&req=5

Figure 2: Top row: mean CBF image of the group. Bottom row: Results of a voxel-wise analysis of CBF vs. WMH volume shows decreased perfusion with increasing disease burden, signified by the blue voxels (p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons, age and sex). The gray scale anatomical image is the ICBM-152 template in radiological convention.
Mentions: Voxel-wise analysis of the CBF data revealed a negative relationship between WMH volume and CBF in the left anterior putamen, subcallosal, accumbens, anterior caudate, orbital frontal, anterior insula, and frontal pole (p < 0.05, corrected for age and sex). Refer to Figure 2 for a map of the significant voxels and Table 2 for MNI coordinates and cluster size. Figure 3 shows the result of the VBM, indicating there was a significant negative relationship between WMH volume and GM estimates in lingual gyrus, intracalcarine, and bilateral hippocampi (p < 0.05, corrected, Table 2). Table 2 shows the association results between the regional CBF values and the Fazekas score.

Bottom Line: WMH have primarily been associated with global white matter and gray matter (GM) changes and less is known about regional effects in GM.The visual rating scale corroborated the regression findings (corrected p < 0.05).WMH lesion volume was associated with intra-group GM CBF and structural differences in this cohort of WMH adults with mild to severe lesion burden.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Heart and Stroke Foundation Canadian Partnership for Stroke Recovery, Sunnybrook Research Institute Toronto, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Cerebral White Matter Hyperintensities (WMH) are associated with vascular risk factors and age-related cognitive decline. WMH have primarily been associated with global white matter and gray matter (GM) changes and less is known about regional effects in GM. The purpose of this study was to test for an association between WMH and two GM imaging measures: cerebral blood flow (CBF) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Twenty-six elderly adults with mild to severe WMH participated in this cross-sectional 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. MRI measures of GM CBF and VBM were derived from arterial spin labeling (ASL) and T1-weighted images, respectively. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were used to quantify the WMH lesion burden (mL). GM CBF and VBM data were used as dependent variables. WMH lesion burden, age and sex were used in a regression model. Visual rating of WMH with the Fazekas method was used to compare the WMH lesion volume regression approach. WMH volume was normally distributed for this group (mean volume of 22.7 mL, range: 2.2-70.6 mL). CBF analysis revealed negative associations between WMH volume and CBF in the left anterior putamen, subcallosal, accumbens, anterior caudate, orbital frontal, anterior insula, and frontal pole (corrected p < 0.05). VBM analysis revealed negative associations between WMH and GM volume in lingual gyrus, intracalcarine, and bilateral hippocampus (corrected p < 0.05). The visual rating scale corroborated the regression findings (corrected p < 0.05). WMH lesion volume was associated with intra-group GM CBF and structural differences in this cohort of WMH adults with mild to severe lesion burden.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus