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Examining shifts in medical students' microanalytic motivation beliefs and regulatory processes during a diagnostic reasoning task.

Cleary TJ, Dong T, Artino AR - Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract (2014)

Bottom Line: Using a contextualized assessment methodology called self-regulated learning microanalysis, the authors found that the 71 medical student participants showed statistically significant and relatively robust declines in their self-efficacy beliefs and strategic regulatory processes following negative feedback about their performance on the diagnostic reasoning task.Descriptive statistics revealed that changes in strategic thinking following negative corrective feedback were most characterized by shifts away from task-specific processes (e.g., integration, differentiating diagnoses) to non-task related factors.Implications and areas for future research are presented and discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA, timothy.cleary@rutgers.edu.

ABSTRACT
This study examined within-group shifts in the motivation beliefs and regulatory processes of second-year medical students as they engaged in a diagnostic reasoning activity. Using a contextualized assessment methodology called self-regulated learning microanalysis, the authors found that the 71 medical student participants showed statistically significant and relatively robust declines in their self-efficacy beliefs and strategic regulatory processes following negative feedback about their performance on the diagnostic reasoning task. Descriptive statistics revealed that changes in strategic thinking following negative corrective feedback were most characterized by shifts away from task-specific processes (e.g., integration, differentiating diagnoses) to non-task related factors. Implications and areas for future research are presented and discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Shifts in mean metacognitive monitoring scores across two time points of the diagnostic reasoning task. The decline in mean values was significantly different at p = .005
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Fig5: Shifts in mean metacognitive monitoring scores across two time points of the diagnostic reasoning task. The decline in mean values was significantly different at p = .005

Mentions: To evaluate shifts in students’ strategic thinking during task engagement, a paired sample t test was used to examine differences between the metacognitive monitoring measure administered during the first and second iteration of the task. The results indicated a statistically significant and medium-sized decline in the quality of participants’ strategic thinking from the first to the second iteration of the task, t(70) = 2.91, p = .005, d = 0.49 (see Fig. 5). That is, the participants showed significantly lower levels of task-specific strategic thinking while performing the second iteration of the diagnostic reasoning task than when attempting to provide their initial diagnosis.Fig. 5


Examining shifts in medical students' microanalytic motivation beliefs and regulatory processes during a diagnostic reasoning task.

Cleary TJ, Dong T, Artino AR - Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract (2014)

Shifts in mean metacognitive monitoring scores across two time points of the diagnostic reasoning task. The decline in mean values was significantly different at p = .005
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495285&req=5

Fig5: Shifts in mean metacognitive monitoring scores across two time points of the diagnostic reasoning task. The decline in mean values was significantly different at p = .005
Mentions: To evaluate shifts in students’ strategic thinking during task engagement, a paired sample t test was used to examine differences between the metacognitive monitoring measure administered during the first and second iteration of the task. The results indicated a statistically significant and medium-sized decline in the quality of participants’ strategic thinking from the first to the second iteration of the task, t(70) = 2.91, p = .005, d = 0.49 (see Fig. 5). That is, the participants showed significantly lower levels of task-specific strategic thinking while performing the second iteration of the diagnostic reasoning task than when attempting to provide their initial diagnosis.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: Using a contextualized assessment methodology called self-regulated learning microanalysis, the authors found that the 71 medical student participants showed statistically significant and relatively robust declines in their self-efficacy beliefs and strategic regulatory processes following negative feedback about their performance on the diagnostic reasoning task.Descriptive statistics revealed that changes in strategic thinking following negative corrective feedback were most characterized by shifts away from task-specific processes (e.g., integration, differentiating diagnoses) to non-task related factors.Implications and areas for future research are presented and discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA, timothy.cleary@rutgers.edu.

ABSTRACT
This study examined within-group shifts in the motivation beliefs and regulatory processes of second-year medical students as they engaged in a diagnostic reasoning activity. Using a contextualized assessment methodology called self-regulated learning microanalysis, the authors found that the 71 medical student participants showed statistically significant and relatively robust declines in their self-efficacy beliefs and strategic regulatory processes following negative feedback about their performance on the diagnostic reasoning task. Descriptive statistics revealed that changes in strategic thinking following negative corrective feedback were most characterized by shifts away from task-specific processes (e.g., integration, differentiating diagnoses) to non-task related factors. Implications and areas for future research are presented and discussed.

No MeSH data available.