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Epidemiology and Characteristics of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Hong DJ, Bae IK, Jang IH, Jeong SH, Kang HK, Lee K - Infect Chemother (2015)

Bottom Line: Each MBL gene is located on specific genetic elements including integrons, transposons, plasmids, or on the chromosome, in which they carry genes encoding determinants of resistance to carbapenems and other antibiotics, conferring multidrug resistance to P. aeruginosa.In addition, these genetic elements are transferable to other Gram-negative species, increasing the antimicrobial resistance rate and complicating the treatment of infected patients.Here, we highlight the characteristics of MPPA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Laboratory Medicine and Research Institute of Bacterial Resistance, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MPPA) is an important nosocomial pathogen that shows resistance to all β-lactam antibiotics except monobactams. There are various types of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa including Imipenemase (IMP), Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (VIM), Sao Paulo metallo-β-lactamase (SPM), Germany imipenemase (GIM), New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM), Florence imipenemase (FIM). Each MBL gene is located on specific genetic elements including integrons, transposons, plasmids, or on the chromosome, in which they carry genes encoding determinants of resistance to carbapenems and other antibiotics, conferring multidrug resistance to P. aeruginosa. In addition, these genetic elements are transferable to other Gram-negative species, increasing the antimicrobial resistance rate and complicating the treatment of infected patients. Therefore, it is essential to understand the epidemiology, resistance mechanism, and molecular characteristics of MPPA for infection control and prevention of a possible global health crisis. Here, we highlight the characteristics of MPPA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Geographical distribution of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Most isolates were collected from 2009 to 2011 with the following exceptions: Chile (2005), Kenya (2006 to 2007), and South Africa (2006). The white colored areas indicate that there was no available published data for that region.
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Figure 1: Geographical distribution of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Most isolates were collected from 2009 to 2011 with the following exceptions: Chile (2005), Kenya (2006 to 2007), and South Africa (2006). The white colored areas indicate that there was no available published data for that region.

Mentions: In most countries, the reported CRPA ratio ranged from 10 to 50%. The carbapenem resistance rates in Canada (carbapenem 3.3%) and the Dominican Republic (imipenem and meropenem, both 8%) were the lowest of all countries, with ratios lower than 10%. On the other hand, ratios in Brazil, Peru, Costa Rica, Russia, Greece, Poland, Iran, and Saudi Arabia were higher than 50% in all drugs of the carbapenem class (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem, ertapenem) ranging from 50% to 75.3% (Fig. 1). As shown in Figure 1, Russia, Southwest Asia, and South America were the predominant areas with antimicrobial resistance rates high enough to cause concern for public health to microbiologists and infection specialists.


Epidemiology and Characteristics of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Hong DJ, Bae IK, Jang IH, Jeong SH, Kang HK, Lee K - Infect Chemother (2015)

Geographical distribution of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Most isolates were collected from 2009 to 2011 with the following exceptions: Chile (2005), Kenya (2006 to 2007), and South Africa (2006). The white colored areas indicate that there was no available published data for that region.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495280&req=5

Figure 1: Geographical distribution of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Most isolates were collected from 2009 to 2011 with the following exceptions: Chile (2005), Kenya (2006 to 2007), and South Africa (2006). The white colored areas indicate that there was no available published data for that region.
Mentions: In most countries, the reported CRPA ratio ranged from 10 to 50%. The carbapenem resistance rates in Canada (carbapenem 3.3%) and the Dominican Republic (imipenem and meropenem, both 8%) were the lowest of all countries, with ratios lower than 10%. On the other hand, ratios in Brazil, Peru, Costa Rica, Russia, Greece, Poland, Iran, and Saudi Arabia were higher than 50% in all drugs of the carbapenem class (imipenem, meropenem, doripenem, ertapenem) ranging from 50% to 75.3% (Fig. 1). As shown in Figure 1, Russia, Southwest Asia, and South America were the predominant areas with antimicrobial resistance rates high enough to cause concern for public health to microbiologists and infection specialists.

Bottom Line: Each MBL gene is located on specific genetic elements including integrons, transposons, plasmids, or on the chromosome, in which they carry genes encoding determinants of resistance to carbapenems and other antibiotics, conferring multidrug resistance to P. aeruginosa.In addition, these genetic elements are transferable to other Gram-negative species, increasing the antimicrobial resistance rate and complicating the treatment of infected patients.Here, we highlight the characteristics of MPPA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Laboratory Medicine and Research Institute of Bacterial Resistance, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Metallo-β-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MPPA) is an important nosocomial pathogen that shows resistance to all β-lactam antibiotics except monobactams. There are various types of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) in carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa including Imipenemase (IMP), Verona integron-encoded metallo-β-lactamase (VIM), Sao Paulo metallo-β-lactamase (SPM), Germany imipenemase (GIM), New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM), Florence imipenemase (FIM). Each MBL gene is located on specific genetic elements including integrons, transposons, plasmids, or on the chromosome, in which they carry genes encoding determinants of resistance to carbapenems and other antibiotics, conferring multidrug resistance to P. aeruginosa. In addition, these genetic elements are transferable to other Gram-negative species, increasing the antimicrobial resistance rate and complicating the treatment of infected patients. Therefore, it is essential to understand the epidemiology, resistance mechanism, and molecular characteristics of MPPA for infection control and prevention of a possible global health crisis. Here, we highlight the characteristics of MPPA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus