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Cat-scratch disease: a wide spectrum of clinical pictures.

Mazur-Melewska K, Mania A, Kemnitz P, Figlerowicz M, Służewski W - Postepy Dermatol Alergol (2015)

Bottom Line: The wide spectrum of diseases connected with these bacteria varies from asymptomatic cases, to skin inflammation, fever of unknown origin, lymphadenopathy, eye disorders, encephalitis and endocarditis.Most cases of cat-scratch disease are self-limited and do not require antibiotic treatment.If an antibiotic is chosen, however, azithromycin has been shown to speed recovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases and Child Neurology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland. Head of the Department: Prof. Wojciech Służewski MD, PhD.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this review is to present an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Bartonella henselae. The wide spectrum of diseases connected with these bacteria varies from asymptomatic cases, to skin inflammation, fever of unknown origin, lymphadenopathy, eye disorders, encephalitis and endocarditis. The reservoirs of B. henselae are domestic animals like cats, guinea pigs, rabbits and occasionally dogs. Diagnosis is most often based on a history of exposure to cats and a serologic test with high titres of the immunoglobulin G antibody to B. henselae. Most cases of cat-scratch disease are self-limited and do not require antibiotic treatment. If an antibiotic is chosen, however, azithromycin has been shown to speed recovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cat-scratch disease – the crusted lesions after treatment
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Figure 0002: Cat-scratch disease – the crusted lesions after treatment

Mentions: The disease begins with an erythematous papule (single or in the group) at the site of inoculation. Diagnosis can be easier if the doctor has all information about cat scratching in the patient's history or finds a visible sign of animal aggression (Figure 1) [2]. The papule appears 3 to 10 days after inoculation, and progresses through erythematous, vesicular, papular and crusted stages (Figure 2). In typical CSD, regional lymphadenopathy occurs 1 to 3 weeks after inoculation and lasts for up to several months. Eighty-five per cent of patients have only a single node involved. Asymmetric lymphadenopathy occurs most frequently in the axillary and epitrochlear nodes (46%), head and neck (26%), and the groin (17.5%). The lymph nodes are painful and movable with solid consistency (Figure 3). In 20–30% of patients, inflamed lymph nodes produce suppuration with purulent fistulas to the skin; approximately 10% of nodes require drainage. About 50% of patients present CSD with mild systemic symptoms like generalised aches, malaise, anorexia, nausea, and abdominal pain [8]. On ultrasound, nodes are multiple, hypoechoic, and highly vascularised with increased echogenicity of the surrounding soft tissues (Figure 4) [9]. Histopathological examination shows an aspecific granulomatous process, with microabscesses and local necrosis in the material taken from inflamed lymph nodes [10].


Cat-scratch disease: a wide spectrum of clinical pictures.

Mazur-Melewska K, Mania A, Kemnitz P, Figlerowicz M, Służewski W - Postepy Dermatol Alergol (2015)

Cat-scratch disease – the crusted lesions after treatment
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495109&req=5

Figure 0002: Cat-scratch disease – the crusted lesions after treatment
Mentions: The disease begins with an erythematous papule (single or in the group) at the site of inoculation. Diagnosis can be easier if the doctor has all information about cat scratching in the patient's history or finds a visible sign of animal aggression (Figure 1) [2]. The papule appears 3 to 10 days after inoculation, and progresses through erythematous, vesicular, papular and crusted stages (Figure 2). In typical CSD, regional lymphadenopathy occurs 1 to 3 weeks after inoculation and lasts for up to several months. Eighty-five per cent of patients have only a single node involved. Asymmetric lymphadenopathy occurs most frequently in the axillary and epitrochlear nodes (46%), head and neck (26%), and the groin (17.5%). The lymph nodes are painful and movable with solid consistency (Figure 3). In 20–30% of patients, inflamed lymph nodes produce suppuration with purulent fistulas to the skin; approximately 10% of nodes require drainage. About 50% of patients present CSD with mild systemic symptoms like generalised aches, malaise, anorexia, nausea, and abdominal pain [8]. On ultrasound, nodes are multiple, hypoechoic, and highly vascularised with increased echogenicity of the surrounding soft tissues (Figure 4) [9]. Histopathological examination shows an aspecific granulomatous process, with microabscesses and local necrosis in the material taken from inflamed lymph nodes [10].

Bottom Line: The wide spectrum of diseases connected with these bacteria varies from asymptomatic cases, to skin inflammation, fever of unknown origin, lymphadenopathy, eye disorders, encephalitis and endocarditis.Most cases of cat-scratch disease are self-limited and do not require antibiotic treatment.If an antibiotic is chosen, however, azithromycin has been shown to speed recovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Infectious Diseases and Child Neurology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland. Head of the Department: Prof. Wojciech Służewski MD, PhD.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this review is to present an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Bartonella henselae. The wide spectrum of diseases connected with these bacteria varies from asymptomatic cases, to skin inflammation, fever of unknown origin, lymphadenopathy, eye disorders, encephalitis and endocarditis. The reservoirs of B. henselae are domestic animals like cats, guinea pigs, rabbits and occasionally dogs. Diagnosis is most often based on a history of exposure to cats and a serologic test with high titres of the immunoglobulin G antibody to B. henselae. Most cases of cat-scratch disease are self-limited and do not require antibiotic treatment. If an antibiotic is chosen, however, azithromycin has been shown to speed recovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus