Limits...
Vascular disease as a cause of death in patients with severe disability due to osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Smith AM, Lingard L, Heslop P, Gray J, Walker DJ - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: The total population was 607 (294 OA; 313 RA). 85% (249) of the OA and 79% (246) of the RA patients had deceased at the time of study in 2008. 85% of the death certificates were found.However, the RA patients died significantly younger.Cause of death is likely to be related to things that OA and RA share, such as disability and some treatments e.g. NSAIDs, whereas age at death relates to differences, such as age of onset and inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rheumatology Department, Room 22, Musculoskeletal Unit, The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE7 7DN UK.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The mechanism of the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains uncertain. We had the opportunity to compare the causes and ages of death in a population of osteoarthritis (OA) and RA patients who had had similar lower limb disability.

Methods: Death certificates were sought for a population of OA and RA patients who had had knee joint replacements performed by a single orthopaedic surgeon over a 10 year period with a minimum follow up period of 18 years. Primary cause of death was assigned by a blinded clinician and compared between the populations. Competing risk analysis was used to compare RA and OA populations for cardiovascular deaths.

Results: The total population was 607 (294 OA; 313 RA). 85% (249) of the OA and 79% (246) of the RA patients had deceased at the time of study in 2008. 85% of the death certificates were found. The RA patients were operated an average of 7.5 years younger and also died 7.5 years younger. The causes of death were similar in the two populations. The ages at death were consistently and similarly older for the OA group for all causes of death. There was a 9% increased risk of cardiovascular death in the RA group but this was not statistically different from the OA group.

Conclusions: OA and RA patients, controlled for lower limb disability, have similar causes of death including cardiovascular disease. However, the RA patients died significantly younger. Cause of death is likely to be related to things that OA and RA share, such as disability and some treatments e.g. NSAIDs, whereas age at death relates to differences, such as age of onset and inflammation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Competing risk analysis for death over time starting with the date of operation. Probability of dying a vascular death adjusted for age, disparity and competing risks.
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495088&req=5

Fig1: Competing risk analysis for death over time starting with the date of operation. Probability of dying a vascular death adjusted for age, disparity and competing risks.

Mentions: The competing risk analysis showed that the RA subjects were at a 9% greater risk of a vascular death compared to the OA subjects (OR 1.09 95% CI 0.6–1.5), adjusted for age and sex. This was not significantly different. The cumulative incidence of death from a vascular cause over time starting with the date of operation are shown in Figure 1 for both RA and OA subjects and can be seen to be similar.Figure 1


Vascular disease as a cause of death in patients with severe disability due to osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Smith AM, Lingard L, Heslop P, Gray J, Walker DJ - Springerplus (2015)

Competing risk analysis for death over time starting with the date of operation. Probability of dying a vascular death adjusted for age, disparity and competing risks.
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495088&req=5

Fig1: Competing risk analysis for death over time starting with the date of operation. Probability of dying a vascular death adjusted for age, disparity and competing risks.
Mentions: The competing risk analysis showed that the RA subjects were at a 9% greater risk of a vascular death compared to the OA subjects (OR 1.09 95% CI 0.6–1.5), adjusted for age and sex. This was not significantly different. The cumulative incidence of death from a vascular cause over time starting with the date of operation are shown in Figure 1 for both RA and OA subjects and can be seen to be similar.Figure 1

Bottom Line: The total population was 607 (294 OA; 313 RA). 85% (249) of the OA and 79% (246) of the RA patients had deceased at the time of study in 2008. 85% of the death certificates were found.However, the RA patients died significantly younger.Cause of death is likely to be related to things that OA and RA share, such as disability and some treatments e.g. NSAIDs, whereas age at death relates to differences, such as age of onset and inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rheumatology Department, Room 22, Musculoskeletal Unit, The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, The Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE7 7DN UK.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The mechanism of the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains uncertain. We had the opportunity to compare the causes and ages of death in a population of osteoarthritis (OA) and RA patients who had had similar lower limb disability.

Methods: Death certificates were sought for a population of OA and RA patients who had had knee joint replacements performed by a single orthopaedic surgeon over a 10 year period with a minimum follow up period of 18 years. Primary cause of death was assigned by a blinded clinician and compared between the populations. Competing risk analysis was used to compare RA and OA populations for cardiovascular deaths.

Results: The total population was 607 (294 OA; 313 RA). 85% (249) of the OA and 79% (246) of the RA patients had deceased at the time of study in 2008. 85% of the death certificates were found. The RA patients were operated an average of 7.5 years younger and also died 7.5 years younger. The causes of death were similar in the two populations. The ages at death were consistently and similarly older for the OA group for all causes of death. There was a 9% increased risk of cardiovascular death in the RA group but this was not statistically different from the OA group.

Conclusions: OA and RA patients, controlled for lower limb disability, have similar causes of death including cardiovascular disease. However, the RA patients died significantly younger. Cause of death is likely to be related to things that OA and RA share, such as disability and some treatments e.g. NSAIDs, whereas age at death relates to differences, such as age of onset and inflammation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus