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Association between Maternal Depression Symptoms across the First Eleven Years of Their Child's Life and Subsequent Offspring Suicidal Ideation.

Hammerton G, Mahedy L, Mars B, Harold GT, Thapar A, Zammit S, Collishaw S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Compared to offspring of mothers with minimal symptoms, the greatest risk of suicidal ideation was found for offspring of mothers with chronic-severe symptoms [OR 3.04 (95% CI 2.19, 4.21)], with evidence for smaller increases in risk of suicidal ideation in offspring of mothers with sub-threshold, increasing and mild symptoms.Twenty-six percent of non-depressed offspring of mothers with chronic-severe depression symptoms reported suicidal ideation.Risk for suicidal ideation should be considered in young people whose mothers have a history of sustained high levels of depression symptoms, even when the offspring themselves do not have a depression diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Depression is common, especially in women of child-bearing age; prevalence estimates for this group range from 8% to 12%, and there is robust evidence that maternal depression is associated with mental health problems in offspring. Suicidal behaviour is a growing concern amongst young people and those exposed to maternal depression are likely to be especially at high risk. The aim of this study was to utilise a large, prospective population cohort to examine the relationship between depression symptom trajectories in mothers over the first eleven years of their child's life and subsequent adolescent suicidal ideation. An additional aim was to test if associations were explained by maternal suicide attempt and offspring depressive disorder. Data were utilised from a population-based birth cohort: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Maternal depression symptoms were assessed repeatedly from pregnancy to child age 11 years. Offspring suicidal ideation was assessed at age 16 years. Using multiple imputation, data for 10,559 families were analysed. Using latent class growth analysis, five distinct classes of maternal depression symptoms were identified (minimal, mild, increasing, sub-threshold, chronic-severe). The prevalence of past-year suicidal ideation at age 16 years was 15% (95% CI: 14-17%). Compared to offspring of mothers with minimal symptoms, the greatest risk of suicidal ideation was found for offspring of mothers with chronic-severe symptoms [OR 3.04 (95% CI 2.19, 4.21)], with evidence for smaller increases in risk of suicidal ideation in offspring of mothers with sub-threshold, increasing and mild symptoms. These associations were not fully accounted for by maternal suicide attempt or offspring depression diagnosis. Twenty-six percent of non-depressed offspring of mothers with chronic-severe depression symptoms reported suicidal ideation. Risk for suicidal ideation should be considered in young people whose mothers have a history of sustained high levels of depression symptoms, even when the offspring themselves do not have a depression diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Five class model of maternal depression symptoms measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) from 18 weeks gestation to child age 11 years.Figure shows both model fitted estimated linear growth trajectories for each class (dotted line) and the observed pseudo-class trajectories for the identified classes (solid line); N = 10,559.
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pone.0131885.g002: Five class model of maternal depression symptoms measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) from 18 weeks gestation to child age 11 years.Figure shows both model fitted estimated linear growth trajectories for each class (dotted line) and the observed pseudo-class trajectories for the identified classes (solid line); N = 10,559.

Mentions: Five classes of maternal depression symptoms were identified, four showing stable levels of symptoms over time but differing in level of severity and one showing increasing symptoms. Fig 2 shows both the model fitted linear growth trajectories for each class and the observed pseudo-class trajectories for the five identified classes of maternal depression symptoms. Approximately 5% of the sample was identified as belonging to a class with high stable symptoms that were consistently above the clinical cut-off of 13 on the EPDS (chronic-severe class; average predicted probability of class membership: 0.93). Nearly 18% belonged to a class with sub-threshold symptoms over time, with symptom levels that were consistently just below the clinical cut-off on the EPDS and decreased very slightly over time (sub-threshold class; predicted probability: 0.87). Just under 6% belonged to a class with increasing symptoms over time, with symptom levels that rose to the clinical cut-off by the last time point (increasing class; predicted probability: 0.78). Just over 30% of the sample belonged to a class with stable mild symptoms over time (mild class; predicted probability: 0.81). Lastly, 40% of the sample belonged to a class with very low levels of depression symptoms over time (minimal class; predicted probability: 0.92). In all further analyses the minimal class is treated as the reference group unless otherwise stated.


Association between Maternal Depression Symptoms across the First Eleven Years of Their Child's Life and Subsequent Offspring Suicidal Ideation.

Hammerton G, Mahedy L, Mars B, Harold GT, Thapar A, Zammit S, Collishaw S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Five class model of maternal depression symptoms measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) from 18 weeks gestation to child age 11 years.Figure shows both model fitted estimated linear growth trajectories for each class (dotted line) and the observed pseudo-class trajectories for the identified classes (solid line); N = 10,559.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4495034&req=5

pone.0131885.g002: Five class model of maternal depression symptoms measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) from 18 weeks gestation to child age 11 years.Figure shows both model fitted estimated linear growth trajectories for each class (dotted line) and the observed pseudo-class trajectories for the identified classes (solid line); N = 10,559.
Mentions: Five classes of maternal depression symptoms were identified, four showing stable levels of symptoms over time but differing in level of severity and one showing increasing symptoms. Fig 2 shows both the model fitted linear growth trajectories for each class and the observed pseudo-class trajectories for the five identified classes of maternal depression symptoms. Approximately 5% of the sample was identified as belonging to a class with high stable symptoms that were consistently above the clinical cut-off of 13 on the EPDS (chronic-severe class; average predicted probability of class membership: 0.93). Nearly 18% belonged to a class with sub-threshold symptoms over time, with symptom levels that were consistently just below the clinical cut-off on the EPDS and decreased very slightly over time (sub-threshold class; predicted probability: 0.87). Just under 6% belonged to a class with increasing symptoms over time, with symptom levels that rose to the clinical cut-off by the last time point (increasing class; predicted probability: 0.78). Just over 30% of the sample belonged to a class with stable mild symptoms over time (mild class; predicted probability: 0.81). Lastly, 40% of the sample belonged to a class with very low levels of depression symptoms over time (minimal class; predicted probability: 0.92). In all further analyses the minimal class is treated as the reference group unless otherwise stated.

Bottom Line: Compared to offspring of mothers with minimal symptoms, the greatest risk of suicidal ideation was found for offspring of mothers with chronic-severe symptoms [OR 3.04 (95% CI 2.19, 4.21)], with evidence for smaller increases in risk of suicidal ideation in offspring of mothers with sub-threshold, increasing and mild symptoms.Twenty-six percent of non-depressed offspring of mothers with chronic-severe depression symptoms reported suicidal ideation.Risk for suicidal ideation should be considered in young people whose mothers have a history of sustained high levels of depression symptoms, even when the offspring themselves do not have a depression diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Depression is common, especially in women of child-bearing age; prevalence estimates for this group range from 8% to 12%, and there is robust evidence that maternal depression is associated with mental health problems in offspring. Suicidal behaviour is a growing concern amongst young people and those exposed to maternal depression are likely to be especially at high risk. The aim of this study was to utilise a large, prospective population cohort to examine the relationship between depression symptom trajectories in mothers over the first eleven years of their child's life and subsequent adolescent suicidal ideation. An additional aim was to test if associations were explained by maternal suicide attempt and offspring depressive disorder. Data were utilised from a population-based birth cohort: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Maternal depression symptoms were assessed repeatedly from pregnancy to child age 11 years. Offspring suicidal ideation was assessed at age 16 years. Using multiple imputation, data for 10,559 families were analysed. Using latent class growth analysis, five distinct classes of maternal depression symptoms were identified (minimal, mild, increasing, sub-threshold, chronic-severe). The prevalence of past-year suicidal ideation at age 16 years was 15% (95% CI: 14-17%). Compared to offspring of mothers with minimal symptoms, the greatest risk of suicidal ideation was found for offspring of mothers with chronic-severe symptoms [OR 3.04 (95% CI 2.19, 4.21)], with evidence for smaller increases in risk of suicidal ideation in offspring of mothers with sub-threshold, increasing and mild symptoms. These associations were not fully accounted for by maternal suicide attempt or offspring depression diagnosis. Twenty-six percent of non-depressed offspring of mothers with chronic-severe depression symptoms reported suicidal ideation. Risk for suicidal ideation should be considered in young people whose mothers have a history of sustained high levels of depression symptoms, even when the offspring themselves do not have a depression diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus