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Parents' Subjective Assessment of Effects of Antiepileptic Drug Discontinuation.

Kim GH, Byeon JH, Eun SH, Eun BL - J Epilepsy Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Many parents express worries about potential negative side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AED) on cognition, behavior, mood, and academic achievement.Except valproate in cognition (p = 0.03), parents did not feel significant change after discontinuation of different drugs.We propose that factors such as earlier age at diagnosis of epilepsy or type of epilepsy might influence parents' subjective feelings about their children's well-being after drug discontinuation, rather than the drug itself.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Many parents express worries about potential negative side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AED) on cognition, behavior, mood, and academic achievement. We aimed to evaluate parents' subjective feelings about cognitive or behavioral changes in their children and their quality of life after antiepileptic drug (AED) discontinuation.

Methods: A modified questionnaire based on the Korean-Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy and the Korean-Child Behavior Checklist was answered by parents whose children were seizure-free over the course of 1 month after AED discontinuation. All children were seizure-free for at least 2 years before AED withdrawal.

Results: Fifty-eight eligible patients (mean age, 14.1 ± 4.5 years) were examined. Except valproate in cognition (p = 0.03), parents did not feel significant change after discontinuation of different drugs. They felt improvement of behavior in generalized epilepsy (p = 0.04) and better quality of life in children less than 6 year of age at diagnosis of epilepsy (p = 0.02).

Conclusions: We propose that factors such as earlier age at diagnosis of epilepsy or type of epilepsy might influence parents' subjective feelings about their children's well-being after drug discontinuation, rather than the drug itself.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relation between age at diagnosis of epilepsy and domains. Parents felt improvement in quality of life after drug withdrawal in the younger age (≤ 6 yr) group.
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f3-er-5-1-9: Relation between age at diagnosis of epilepsy and domains. Parents felt improvement in quality of life after drug withdrawal in the younger age (≤ 6 yr) group.

Mentions: Parents felt improvement in quality of life after drug withdrawal in the younger age (≤ 6 years old) group (Fig. 3; p = 0.02). No significant difference was noted on other seizure history, such as duration of medication or seizure-free time.


Parents' Subjective Assessment of Effects of Antiepileptic Drug Discontinuation.

Kim GH, Byeon JH, Eun SH, Eun BL - J Epilepsy Res (2015)

Relation between age at diagnosis of epilepsy and domains. Parents felt improvement in quality of life after drug withdrawal in the younger age (≤ 6 yr) group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494995&req=5

f3-er-5-1-9: Relation between age at diagnosis of epilepsy and domains. Parents felt improvement in quality of life after drug withdrawal in the younger age (≤ 6 yr) group.
Mentions: Parents felt improvement in quality of life after drug withdrawal in the younger age (≤ 6 years old) group (Fig. 3; p = 0.02). No significant difference was noted on other seizure history, such as duration of medication or seizure-free time.

Bottom Line: Many parents express worries about potential negative side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AED) on cognition, behavior, mood, and academic achievement.Except valproate in cognition (p = 0.03), parents did not feel significant change after discontinuation of different drugs.We propose that factors such as earlier age at diagnosis of epilepsy or type of epilepsy might influence parents' subjective feelings about their children's well-being after drug discontinuation, rather than the drug itself.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Many parents express worries about potential negative side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AED) on cognition, behavior, mood, and academic achievement. We aimed to evaluate parents' subjective feelings about cognitive or behavioral changes in their children and their quality of life after antiepileptic drug (AED) discontinuation.

Methods: A modified questionnaire based on the Korean-Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy and the Korean-Child Behavior Checklist was answered by parents whose children were seizure-free over the course of 1 month after AED discontinuation. All children were seizure-free for at least 2 years before AED withdrawal.

Results: Fifty-eight eligible patients (mean age, 14.1 ± 4.5 years) were examined. Except valproate in cognition (p = 0.03), parents did not feel significant change after discontinuation of different drugs. They felt improvement of behavior in generalized epilepsy (p = 0.04) and better quality of life in children less than 6 year of age at diagnosis of epilepsy (p = 0.02).

Conclusions: We propose that factors such as earlier age at diagnosis of epilepsy or type of epilepsy might influence parents' subjective feelings about their children's well-being after drug discontinuation, rather than the drug itself.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus