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A standardized autopsy procurement allows for the comprehensive study of DIPG biology.

Kambhampati M, Perez JP, Yadavilli S, Saratsis AM, Hill AD, Ho CY, Panditharatna E, Markel M, Packer RJ, Nazarian J - Oncotarget (2015)

Bottom Line: Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is one of the least understood and most deadly childhood cancers.Collaborative efforts to share data and tumor specimens have resulted in rapid discoveries in other pediatric brain tumors, such as medulloblastoma, and therefore have the potential to shed light on the biology of DIPG.Sixteen autopsies were performed throughout the United States and Canada and processed using a standard protocol and inventory method, including specimen imaging, fixation, snap freezing, orthotopic injection, or preservation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center for Genetic Medicine, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC, USA.

ABSTRACT
Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is one of the least understood and most deadly childhood cancers. Historically, there has been a paucity of DIPG specimens for molecular analysis. However, due to the generous participation of DIPG families in programs for postmortem specimen donation, there has been a recent surge in molecular analysis of newly available tumor specimens. Collaborative efforts to share data and tumor specimens have resulted in rapid discoveries in other pediatric brain tumors, such as medulloblastoma, and therefore have the potential to shed light on the biology of DIPG. Given the generous gift of postmortem tissue donation from DIPG patients, there is a need for standardized postmortem specimen accrual to facilitate rapid and effective multi-institutional molecular studies.We developed and implemented an autopsy protocol for rapid procurement, documenting and storing these specimens. Sixteen autopsies were performed throughout the United States and Canada and processed using a standard protocol and inventory method, including specimen imaging, fixation, snap freezing, orthotopic injection, or preservation. This allowed for comparative clinical and biological studies of rare postmortem DIPG tissue specimens, generation of in vivo and in vitro models of DIPG, and detailed records to facilitate collaborative analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation of histological studies with clinical dataSagittal (a) and axial (b) MR images from a DIPG patient were correlated with autopsied brainstem tissue. The transverse line (a) indicates the plane represented by formalin fixed specimen shown in panel c. Each specimen was clearly labeled (red markings) and cut into sub-blocks. Panel d shows a representative of one sub-block (asterisk in c) that was processed for H&E staining.
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Figure 3: Correlation of histological studies with clinical dataSagittal (a) and axial (b) MR images from a DIPG patient were correlated with autopsied brainstem tissue. The transverse line (a) indicates the plane represented by formalin fixed specimen shown in panel c. Each specimen was clearly labeled (red markings) and cut into sub-blocks. Panel d shows a representative of one sub-block (asterisk in c) that was processed for H&E staining.

Mentions: All specimens were procured and processed as described in Methods. The procurement method ensured standardization of the autopsy and specimen acquisition process, allowing correlation of autopsied materials with clinical data. For example, due to the accurate characterization and documentation of sections obtained from brainstem, we were able to correlate frozen tumor samples with representative images on MR studies (Fig. 3a, b). Moreover, this standardized specimen procurement method can facilitate specimen tracking in cases where original autopsy material is shared among various institutions (Fig. 3c, d).


A standardized autopsy procurement allows for the comprehensive study of DIPG biology.

Kambhampati M, Perez JP, Yadavilli S, Saratsis AM, Hill AD, Ho CY, Panditharatna E, Markel M, Packer RJ, Nazarian J - Oncotarget (2015)

Correlation of histological studies with clinical dataSagittal (a) and axial (b) MR images from a DIPG patient were correlated with autopsied brainstem tissue. The transverse line (a) indicates the plane represented by formalin fixed specimen shown in panel c. Each specimen was clearly labeled (red markings) and cut into sub-blocks. Panel d shows a representative of one sub-block (asterisk in c) that was processed for H&E staining.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494970&req=5

Figure 3: Correlation of histological studies with clinical dataSagittal (a) and axial (b) MR images from a DIPG patient were correlated with autopsied brainstem tissue. The transverse line (a) indicates the plane represented by formalin fixed specimen shown in panel c. Each specimen was clearly labeled (red markings) and cut into sub-blocks. Panel d shows a representative of one sub-block (asterisk in c) that was processed for H&E staining.
Mentions: All specimens were procured and processed as described in Methods. The procurement method ensured standardization of the autopsy and specimen acquisition process, allowing correlation of autopsied materials with clinical data. For example, due to the accurate characterization and documentation of sections obtained from brainstem, we were able to correlate frozen tumor samples with representative images on MR studies (Fig. 3a, b). Moreover, this standardized specimen procurement method can facilitate specimen tracking in cases where original autopsy material is shared among various institutions (Fig. 3c, d).

Bottom Line: Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is one of the least understood and most deadly childhood cancers.Collaborative efforts to share data and tumor specimens have resulted in rapid discoveries in other pediatric brain tumors, such as medulloblastoma, and therefore have the potential to shed light on the biology of DIPG.Sixteen autopsies were performed throughout the United States and Canada and processed using a standard protocol and inventory method, including specimen imaging, fixation, snap freezing, orthotopic injection, or preservation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center for Genetic Medicine, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC, USA.

ABSTRACT
Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is one of the least understood and most deadly childhood cancers. Historically, there has been a paucity of DIPG specimens for molecular analysis. However, due to the generous participation of DIPG families in programs for postmortem specimen donation, there has been a recent surge in molecular analysis of newly available tumor specimens. Collaborative efforts to share data and tumor specimens have resulted in rapid discoveries in other pediatric brain tumors, such as medulloblastoma, and therefore have the potential to shed light on the biology of DIPG. Given the generous gift of postmortem tissue donation from DIPG patients, there is a need for standardized postmortem specimen accrual to facilitate rapid and effective multi-institutional molecular studies.We developed and implemented an autopsy protocol for rapid procurement, documenting and storing these specimens. Sixteen autopsies were performed throughout the United States and Canada and processed using a standard protocol and inventory method, including specimen imaging, fixation, snap freezing, orthotopic injection, or preservation. This allowed for comparative clinical and biological studies of rare postmortem DIPG tissue specimens, generation of in vivo and in vitro models of DIPG, and detailed records to facilitate collaborative analysis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus