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Indium Tin Oxide Nanowire Networks as Effective UV/Vis Photodetection Platforms.

Zhao S, Choi D, Lee T, Boyd AK, Barbara P, Van Keuren E, Hahm JI - J Phys Chem C Nanomater Interfaces (2014)

Bottom Line: The photoresponsivity of the ITO NW devices ranges from 0.07 to 0.2 A/W at a 3 V bias, whose values are in the performance range of most commercial UV/vis photodetectors.Such useful photodetector characteristics from our ITO NW mesh devices are attained straightforwardly without the need for complicated fabrication procedures involving highly specialized lithographic tools.Therefore, our approach of ITO NW network-based photodetectors can serve as a convenient alternative to commercial or single NW-based devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University , 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20057, United States ; College of Science, China University of Petroleum , Beijing 102249, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

We demonstrate that indium tin oxide nanowires (ITO NWs) and cationic polymer-modified ITO NWs configured in a network format can be used as high performing UV/vis photodetectors. The photovoltage response of ITO NWs is much higher than similarly constructed devices made from tin oxide, zinc tin oxide, and zinc oxide nanostructures. The ITO NW mesh-based devices exhibit a substantial photovoltage (31-100 mV under illumination with a 1.14 mW 543 nm laser) and photocurrent (225-325 μA at 3 V). The response time of the devices is fast with a rise time of 20-30 μs and a decay time of 1.5-3.7 ms when probed with a 355 nm pulsed laser. The photoresponsivity of the ITO NW devices ranges from 0.07 to 0.2 A/W at a 3 V bias, whose values are in the performance range of most commercial UV/vis photodetectors. Such useful photodetector characteristics from our ITO NW mesh devices are attained straightforwardly without the need for complicated fabrication procedures involving highly specialized lithographic tools. Therefore, our approach of ITO NW network-based photodetectors can serve as a convenient alternative to commercial or single NW-based devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Typical current versus voltage (I–V) plot is shown for ITO NWs. Dark current (Id) and photocurrent (Iph) are obtainedwhile sweeping the L–R voltage from −3 to +3 V. The543 nm laser serves as the illumination source. The I–V plot in the right panel displays a magnified view of the blue squaredregion in the I–V curve on the left. The open-circuitvoltage (Voc) and short-circuit current(Isc) upon illumination are determinedas 15 mV and 7.7 × 10–8 A, respectively, forthe ITO NWs. (b) Typical I–V characteristicsare displayed for PLL/ITO NW devices. The open-circuit voltage (Voc) and short-circuit current (Isc) upon illumination are determined as 67 mV and 1.0× 10–7 A, respectively, as indicated in themagnified I–V panel shown on the right. (c)The photoresponsivity data of the ITO NW and PLL/ITO NW mesh devicesare plotted against the bias in black and purple, respectively.
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fig4: (a) Typical current versus voltage (I–V) plot is shown for ITO NWs. Dark current (Id) and photocurrent (Iph) are obtainedwhile sweeping the L–R voltage from −3 to +3 V. The543 nm laser serves as the illumination source. The I–V plot in the right panel displays a magnified view of the blue squaredregion in the I–V curve on the left. The open-circuitvoltage (Voc) and short-circuit current(Isc) upon illumination are determinedas 15 mV and 7.7 × 10–8 A, respectively, forthe ITO NWs. (b) Typical I–V characteristicsare displayed for PLL/ITO NW devices. The open-circuit voltage (Voc) and short-circuit current (Isc) upon illumination are determined as 67 mV and 1.0× 10–7 A, respectively, as indicated in themagnified I–V panel shown on the right. (c)The photoresponsivity data of the ITO NW and PLL/ITO NW mesh devicesare plotted against the bias in black and purple, respectively.

Mentions: Inorder to understand this response, current–voltage (I–V) measurements were carried outby sweeping the L–R voltage from −3 to 3 V with an incrementof 10 mV using the HP pA-meter/DC-voltage source. The light sourceused for the I–V measurements was the 543nm laser. Figure 4 displays the resulting I–V characteristics of the ITO NW devices with andwithout the PLL modification. Asymmetric I–V curves are observed from both ITO NW and PLL/ITO NW devices. Suchasymmetrical I–V curves have been reportedpreviously on single nanomaterial devices such as ZnO NBs and NWsas well as Ge NW mesh devices.28−31 However, the exact origin of the rectifying I–V curves in these systems is not clear and stillunder debate.


Indium Tin Oxide Nanowire Networks as Effective UV/Vis Photodetection Platforms.

Zhao S, Choi D, Lee T, Boyd AK, Barbara P, Van Keuren E, Hahm JI - J Phys Chem C Nanomater Interfaces (2014)

(a) Typical current versus voltage (I–V) plot is shown for ITO NWs. Dark current (Id) and photocurrent (Iph) are obtainedwhile sweeping the L–R voltage from −3 to +3 V. The543 nm laser serves as the illumination source. The I–V plot in the right panel displays a magnified view of the blue squaredregion in the I–V curve on the left. The open-circuitvoltage (Voc) and short-circuit current(Isc) upon illumination are determinedas 15 mV and 7.7 × 10–8 A, respectively, forthe ITO NWs. (b) Typical I–V characteristicsare displayed for PLL/ITO NW devices. The open-circuit voltage (Voc) and short-circuit current (Isc) upon illumination are determined as 67 mV and 1.0× 10–7 A, respectively, as indicated in themagnified I–V panel shown on the right. (c)The photoresponsivity data of the ITO NW and PLL/ITO NW mesh devicesare plotted against the bias in black and purple, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494646&req=5

fig4: (a) Typical current versus voltage (I–V) plot is shown for ITO NWs. Dark current (Id) and photocurrent (Iph) are obtainedwhile sweeping the L–R voltage from −3 to +3 V. The543 nm laser serves as the illumination source. The I–V plot in the right panel displays a magnified view of the blue squaredregion in the I–V curve on the left. The open-circuitvoltage (Voc) and short-circuit current(Isc) upon illumination are determinedas 15 mV and 7.7 × 10–8 A, respectively, forthe ITO NWs. (b) Typical I–V characteristicsare displayed for PLL/ITO NW devices. The open-circuit voltage (Voc) and short-circuit current (Isc) upon illumination are determined as 67 mV and 1.0× 10–7 A, respectively, as indicated in themagnified I–V panel shown on the right. (c)The photoresponsivity data of the ITO NW and PLL/ITO NW mesh devicesare plotted against the bias in black and purple, respectively.
Mentions: Inorder to understand this response, current–voltage (I–V) measurements were carried outby sweeping the L–R voltage from −3 to 3 V with an incrementof 10 mV using the HP pA-meter/DC-voltage source. The light sourceused for the I–V measurements was the 543nm laser. Figure 4 displays the resulting I–V characteristics of the ITO NW devices with andwithout the PLL modification. Asymmetric I–V curves are observed from both ITO NW and PLL/ITO NW devices. Suchasymmetrical I–V curves have been reportedpreviously on single nanomaterial devices such as ZnO NBs and NWsas well as Ge NW mesh devices.28−31 However, the exact origin of the rectifying I–V curves in these systems is not clear and stillunder debate.

Bottom Line: The photoresponsivity of the ITO NW devices ranges from 0.07 to 0.2 A/W at a 3 V bias, whose values are in the performance range of most commercial UV/vis photodetectors.Such useful photodetector characteristics from our ITO NW mesh devices are attained straightforwardly without the need for complicated fabrication procedures involving highly specialized lithographic tools.Therefore, our approach of ITO NW network-based photodetectors can serve as a convenient alternative to commercial or single NW-based devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University , 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20057, United States ; College of Science, China University of Petroleum , Beijing 102249, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

We demonstrate that indium tin oxide nanowires (ITO NWs) and cationic polymer-modified ITO NWs configured in a network format can be used as high performing UV/vis photodetectors. The photovoltage response of ITO NWs is much higher than similarly constructed devices made from tin oxide, zinc tin oxide, and zinc oxide nanostructures. The ITO NW mesh-based devices exhibit a substantial photovoltage (31-100 mV under illumination with a 1.14 mW 543 nm laser) and photocurrent (225-325 μA at 3 V). The response time of the devices is fast with a rise time of 20-30 μs and a decay time of 1.5-3.7 ms when probed with a 355 nm pulsed laser. The photoresponsivity of the ITO NW devices ranges from 0.07 to 0.2 A/W at a 3 V bias, whose values are in the performance range of most commercial UV/vis photodetectors. Such useful photodetector characteristics from our ITO NW mesh devices are attained straightforwardly without the need for complicated fabrication procedures involving highly specialized lithographic tools. Therefore, our approach of ITO NW network-based photodetectors can serve as a convenient alternative to commercial or single NW-based devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus