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Indium Tin Oxide Nanowire Networks as Effective UV/Vis Photodetection Platforms.

Zhao S, Choi D, Lee T, Boyd AK, Barbara P, Van Keuren E, Hahm JI - J Phys Chem C Nanomater Interfaces (2014)

Bottom Line: The photoresponsivity of the ITO NW devices ranges from 0.07 to 0.2 A/W at a 3 V bias, whose values are in the performance range of most commercial UV/vis photodetectors.Such useful photodetector characteristics from our ITO NW mesh devices are attained straightforwardly without the need for complicated fabrication procedures involving highly specialized lithographic tools.Therefore, our approach of ITO NW network-based photodetectors can serve as a convenient alternative to commercial or single NW-based devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University , 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20057, United States ; College of Science, China University of Petroleum , Beijing 102249, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

We demonstrate that indium tin oxide nanowires (ITO NWs) and cationic polymer-modified ITO NWs configured in a network format can be used as high performing UV/vis photodetectors. The photovoltage response of ITO NWs is much higher than similarly constructed devices made from tin oxide, zinc tin oxide, and zinc oxide nanostructures. The ITO NW mesh-based devices exhibit a substantial photovoltage (31-100 mV under illumination with a 1.14 mW 543 nm laser) and photocurrent (225-325 μA at 3 V). The response time of the devices is fast with a rise time of 20-30 μs and a decay time of 1.5-3.7 ms when probed with a 355 nm pulsed laser. The photoresponsivity of the ITO NW devices ranges from 0.07 to 0.2 A/W at a 3 V bias, whose values are in the performance range of most commercial UV/vis photodetectors. Such useful photodetector characteristics from our ITO NW mesh devices are attained straightforwardly without the need for complicated fabrication procedures involving highly specialized lithographic tools. Therefore, our approach of ITO NW network-based photodetectors can serve as a convenient alternative to commercial or single NW-based devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Typical photovoltage response obtainedfrom PLL-modified ITONW devices upon periodic illumination with a 543 nm laser displayed.Plots indicated as (1), (2), and (3) correspond to voltage signalchanges depending on the laser position as indicated in the schematic.(b) Voltage difference (Vph –Vd) between 543 nm light-on and -off is recordedat five different illumination positions along the middle of the PLL/ITONW device spanning one electrode to the other. Relative laser positionsare marked as (1) through (5) as shown in the schematic. (c) Typicalphotovoltage signal obtained from PLL/ITO NW devices probed by a 355nm pulsed laser is shown. The inset is a zoomed-in view with the lighton to show clearly the rise time.
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fig3: (a) Typical photovoltage response obtainedfrom PLL-modified ITONW devices upon periodic illumination with a 543 nm laser displayed.Plots indicated as (1), (2), and (3) correspond to voltage signalchanges depending on the laser position as indicated in the schematic.(b) Voltage difference (Vph –Vd) between 543 nm light-on and -off is recordedat five different illumination positions along the middle of the PLL/ITONW device spanning one electrode to the other. Relative laser positionsare marked as (1) through (5) as shown in the schematic. (c) Typicalphotovoltage signal obtained from PLL/ITO NW devices probed by a 355nm pulsed laser is shown. The inset is a zoomed-in view with the lighton to show clearly the rise time.

Mentions: Electrical responses in many nanomaterial-based electronicdevicescan be effectively tailored by a simple modification of the channelsurfaces of the devices.15−19 Organic amines and polymers have been utilized previously as gatesor gate modifiers in chemical- and electrolyte-gating applications,respectively.15−19 These methods can produce a large change in electrical signal viasimple means without introducing chemical dopants or charge-separatinglayers into the channel material. In order to test whether the light-activated,electrical response of our nanomaterial devices can be altered ina similar way, a cationic polymer of PLL was chosen as a model systemand uniformly applied to the surface of the ITO NW layer. Typicalphotovoltage signals from the PLL-treated ITO NW (PLL/ITO NW) deviceswere subsequently probed by using the 543 nm laser, and the resultsare provided in Figure 3(a). When keeping thesame laser spot on the sample position yielding the highest signal,a significantly increased Vph value of100 mV is recorded on PLL/ITO NWs as plotted in black in Figure 3(a). The photoresponse decreases when it is positionedaway from the edge toward the middle of the sample. Colored plotsin Figure 3(b) display such changes in photoresponseamplitudes when varying the laser position along a line spanning fromone electrode to the other (marked as L and R electrodes in the schematics)on the PLL/ITO NW device. Vph varies withthe light position on the line between the L and R electrodes withΔVph/Δx ofapproximately 20 mV/mm for PLL/ITO NWs. Figure 3(c) displays the photovoltage response of the PLL/ITO NW device uponillumination with the 355 nm pulsed laser. The response time of thePLL/ITO NW device is slightly longer than the ITO NW device, exhibiting Tr = 30 μs and Td = 3.7 ms.


Indium Tin Oxide Nanowire Networks as Effective UV/Vis Photodetection Platforms.

Zhao S, Choi D, Lee T, Boyd AK, Barbara P, Van Keuren E, Hahm JI - J Phys Chem C Nanomater Interfaces (2014)

(a) Typical photovoltage response obtainedfrom PLL-modified ITONW devices upon periodic illumination with a 543 nm laser displayed.Plots indicated as (1), (2), and (3) correspond to voltage signalchanges depending on the laser position as indicated in the schematic.(b) Voltage difference (Vph –Vd) between 543 nm light-on and -off is recordedat five different illumination positions along the middle of the PLL/ITONW device spanning one electrode to the other. Relative laser positionsare marked as (1) through (5) as shown in the schematic. (c) Typicalphotovoltage signal obtained from PLL/ITO NW devices probed by a 355nm pulsed laser is shown. The inset is a zoomed-in view with the lighton to show clearly the rise time.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494646&req=5

fig3: (a) Typical photovoltage response obtainedfrom PLL-modified ITONW devices upon periodic illumination with a 543 nm laser displayed.Plots indicated as (1), (2), and (3) correspond to voltage signalchanges depending on the laser position as indicated in the schematic.(b) Voltage difference (Vph –Vd) between 543 nm light-on and -off is recordedat five different illumination positions along the middle of the PLL/ITONW device spanning one electrode to the other. Relative laser positionsare marked as (1) through (5) as shown in the schematic. (c) Typicalphotovoltage signal obtained from PLL/ITO NW devices probed by a 355nm pulsed laser is shown. The inset is a zoomed-in view with the lighton to show clearly the rise time.
Mentions: Electrical responses in many nanomaterial-based electronicdevicescan be effectively tailored by a simple modification of the channelsurfaces of the devices.15−19 Organic amines and polymers have been utilized previously as gatesor gate modifiers in chemical- and electrolyte-gating applications,respectively.15−19 These methods can produce a large change in electrical signal viasimple means without introducing chemical dopants or charge-separatinglayers into the channel material. In order to test whether the light-activated,electrical response of our nanomaterial devices can be altered ina similar way, a cationic polymer of PLL was chosen as a model systemand uniformly applied to the surface of the ITO NW layer. Typicalphotovoltage signals from the PLL-treated ITO NW (PLL/ITO NW) deviceswere subsequently probed by using the 543 nm laser, and the resultsare provided in Figure 3(a). When keeping thesame laser spot on the sample position yielding the highest signal,a significantly increased Vph value of100 mV is recorded on PLL/ITO NWs as plotted in black in Figure 3(a). The photoresponse decreases when it is positionedaway from the edge toward the middle of the sample. Colored plotsin Figure 3(b) display such changes in photoresponseamplitudes when varying the laser position along a line spanning fromone electrode to the other (marked as L and R electrodes in the schematics)on the PLL/ITO NW device. Vph varies withthe light position on the line between the L and R electrodes withΔVph/Δx ofapproximately 20 mV/mm for PLL/ITO NWs. Figure 3(c) displays the photovoltage response of the PLL/ITO NW device uponillumination with the 355 nm pulsed laser. The response time of thePLL/ITO NW device is slightly longer than the ITO NW device, exhibiting Tr = 30 μs and Td = 3.7 ms.

Bottom Line: The photoresponsivity of the ITO NW devices ranges from 0.07 to 0.2 A/W at a 3 V bias, whose values are in the performance range of most commercial UV/vis photodetectors.Such useful photodetector characteristics from our ITO NW mesh devices are attained straightforwardly without the need for complicated fabrication procedures involving highly specialized lithographic tools.Therefore, our approach of ITO NW network-based photodetectors can serve as a convenient alternative to commercial or single NW-based devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Georgetown University , 37th & O Streets NW, Washington, DC 20057, United States ; College of Science, China University of Petroleum , Beijing 102249, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

We demonstrate that indium tin oxide nanowires (ITO NWs) and cationic polymer-modified ITO NWs configured in a network format can be used as high performing UV/vis photodetectors. The photovoltage response of ITO NWs is much higher than similarly constructed devices made from tin oxide, zinc tin oxide, and zinc oxide nanostructures. The ITO NW mesh-based devices exhibit a substantial photovoltage (31-100 mV under illumination with a 1.14 mW 543 nm laser) and photocurrent (225-325 μA at 3 V). The response time of the devices is fast with a rise time of 20-30 μs and a decay time of 1.5-3.7 ms when probed with a 355 nm pulsed laser. The photoresponsivity of the ITO NW devices ranges from 0.07 to 0.2 A/W at a 3 V bias, whose values are in the performance range of most commercial UV/vis photodetectors. Such useful photodetector characteristics from our ITO NW mesh devices are attained straightforwardly without the need for complicated fabrication procedures involving highly specialized lithographic tools. Therefore, our approach of ITO NW network-based photodetectors can serve as a convenient alternative to commercial or single NW-based devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus