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Technical Note - Lateral Approach to the Lumbar Spine for the Removal of Interbody Cages.

Moisi M, Page J, Paulson D, Oskouian RJ - Cureus (2015)

Bottom Line: Revision surgery to address the migration or fracture of a lumbar interbody cage can be technically challenging. Scar tissue and fibrosis, among other anatomic barriers, can make removal of the cage a complicated procedure, potentially increasing postoperative pain as well as the probability of neurologic deficits. Use of the lateral surgical technique for removal of the cage can avoid these potential complications. In this case report, we describe the removal of interbody cages through a lateral approach in three patients without the necessity of additional posterior hardware revision.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurosurgery, Swedish Neuroscience Institute.

ABSTRACT
Revision surgery to address the migration or fracture of a lumbar interbody cage can be technically challenging. Scar tissue and fibrosis, among other anatomic barriers, can make removal of the cage a complicated procedure, potentially increasing postoperative pain as well as the probability of neurologic deficits. Use of the lateral surgical technique for removal of the cage can avoid these potential complications. In this case report, we describe the removal of interbody cages through a lateral approach in three patients without the necessity of additional posterior hardware revision.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cage MigrationComputed tomography (CT) demonstrating migration and displacement of the interbody cage into the spinal canal causing severe central canal stenosis.
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FIG1: Cage MigrationComputed tomography (CT) demonstrating migration and displacement of the interbody cage into the spinal canal causing severe central canal stenosis.

Mentions: The first patient reviewed was a 71-year-old female who fell six weeks postoperatively following a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) at L3-4. Subsequently, she developed lumbar and radicular pain. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated displacement of the interbody cage into the spinal canal causing severe central canal stenosis (Figure 1).


Technical Note - Lateral Approach to the Lumbar Spine for the Removal of Interbody Cages.

Moisi M, Page J, Paulson D, Oskouian RJ - Cureus (2015)

Cage MigrationComputed tomography (CT) demonstrating migration and displacement of the interbody cage into the spinal canal causing severe central canal stenosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494582&req=5

FIG1: Cage MigrationComputed tomography (CT) demonstrating migration and displacement of the interbody cage into the spinal canal causing severe central canal stenosis.
Mentions: The first patient reviewed was a 71-year-old female who fell six weeks postoperatively following a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) at L3-4. Subsequently, she developed lumbar and radicular pain. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated displacement of the interbody cage into the spinal canal causing severe central canal stenosis (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Revision surgery to address the migration or fracture of a lumbar interbody cage can be technically challenging. Scar tissue and fibrosis, among other anatomic barriers, can make removal of the cage a complicated procedure, potentially increasing postoperative pain as well as the probability of neurologic deficits. Use of the lateral surgical technique for removal of the cage can avoid these potential complications. In this case report, we describe the removal of interbody cages through a lateral approach in three patients without the necessity of additional posterior hardware revision.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurosurgery, Swedish Neuroscience Institute.

ABSTRACT
Revision surgery to address the migration or fracture of a lumbar interbody cage can be technically challenging. Scar tissue and fibrosis, among other anatomic barriers, can make removal of the cage a complicated procedure, potentially increasing postoperative pain as well as the probability of neurologic deficits. Use of the lateral surgical technique for removal of the cage can avoid these potential complications. In this case report, we describe the removal of interbody cages through a lateral approach in three patients without the necessity of additional posterior hardware revision.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus