Limits...
A Rare Case of Optic Nerve Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Ramey WL, Arnold SJ, Chiu A, Lemole M - Cureus (2015)

Bottom Line: Additionally, because of its medial position relative to the optic nerve and within the orbital apex, it is the first such case to be resected via an endoscopic endonasal approach.The lesion was subtotally resected because of its adherence and continuity with the optic nerve and the patient's wish to preserve his vision.He was subsequently referred to radiation oncology for external beam radiation therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurosurgery, University of Arizona.

ABSTRACT

Background and importance: Schwannomas are typically benign tumors of the peripheral nervous system that originate from Schwann cells. It is well known that the optic nerves are myelinated by oligodendrocytes since their cell bodies arise centrally within the lateral geniculate nuclei. Because of this basic cellular anatomy, optic schwannomas should theoretically not exist. It is possible, however, these rare lesions stem from small sympathetic fibers that innervate the vasculature surrounding the optic nerve and its sheath.

Clinical presentation: The patient is a 46-year-old male with a one-year history of progressive right eye blurry vision. To our knowledge, there are only five known reported case of an optic nerve schwannoma. Additionally, because of its medial position relative to the optic nerve and within the orbital apex, it is the first such case to be resected via an endoscopic endonasal approach. The lesion was subtotally resected because of its adherence and continuity with the optic nerve and the patient's wish to preserve his vision. He was subsequently referred to radiation oncology for external beam radiation therapy.

Conclusion: Herein, we discuss the pertinent clinical findings of this rare lesion and review the literature relative to optic nerve and solitary orbital schwannomas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pathology slides demonstrating a diagnosis of optic nerve schwannomaHematoxylin and eosin slide at 20x showing the classic palisading pattern of schwannoma (A). Positive S100 stain (B) and negative EMA (endothelial membrane antigen) stain (C) both at 20x. 
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494577&req=5

FIG2: Pathology slides demonstrating a diagnosis of optic nerve schwannomaHematoxylin and eosin slide at 20x showing the classic palisading pattern of schwannoma (A). Positive S100 stain (B) and negative EMA (endothelial membrane antigen) stain (C) both at 20x. 

Mentions: The specimen also stained positive for S100 and was negative for EMA (endothelial membrane antigen), thus confirming the diagnosis of schwannoma (Figure 2).


A Rare Case of Optic Nerve Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Ramey WL, Arnold SJ, Chiu A, Lemole M - Cureus (2015)

Pathology slides demonstrating a diagnosis of optic nerve schwannomaHematoxylin and eosin slide at 20x showing the classic palisading pattern of schwannoma (A). Positive S100 stain (B) and negative EMA (endothelial membrane antigen) stain (C) both at 20x. 
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494577&req=5

FIG2: Pathology slides demonstrating a diagnosis of optic nerve schwannomaHematoxylin and eosin slide at 20x showing the classic palisading pattern of schwannoma (A). Positive S100 stain (B) and negative EMA (endothelial membrane antigen) stain (C) both at 20x. 
Mentions: The specimen also stained positive for S100 and was negative for EMA (endothelial membrane antigen), thus confirming the diagnosis of schwannoma (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Additionally, because of its medial position relative to the optic nerve and within the orbital apex, it is the first such case to be resected via an endoscopic endonasal approach.The lesion was subtotally resected because of its adherence and continuity with the optic nerve and the patient's wish to preserve his vision.He was subsequently referred to radiation oncology for external beam radiation therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurosurgery, University of Arizona.

ABSTRACT

Background and importance: Schwannomas are typically benign tumors of the peripheral nervous system that originate from Schwann cells. It is well known that the optic nerves are myelinated by oligodendrocytes since their cell bodies arise centrally within the lateral geniculate nuclei. Because of this basic cellular anatomy, optic schwannomas should theoretically not exist. It is possible, however, these rare lesions stem from small sympathetic fibers that innervate the vasculature surrounding the optic nerve and its sheath.

Clinical presentation: The patient is a 46-year-old male with a one-year history of progressive right eye blurry vision. To our knowledge, there are only five known reported case of an optic nerve schwannoma. Additionally, because of its medial position relative to the optic nerve and within the orbital apex, it is the first such case to be resected via an endoscopic endonasal approach. The lesion was subtotally resected because of its adherence and continuity with the optic nerve and the patient's wish to preserve his vision. He was subsequently referred to radiation oncology for external beam radiation therapy.

Conclusion: Herein, we discuss the pertinent clinical findings of this rare lesion and review the literature relative to optic nerve and solitary orbital schwannomas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus