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A Flowable Placental Tissue Matrix Allograft in Lower Extremity Injuries: A Pilot Study.

Lullove E - Cureus (2015)

Bottom Line: Even after successful surgery, these procedures often result in reduced joint mobility and tendon or ligament strength.In this pilot study, 9 of 10 patients reported pain levels of 2 or less by week four using the VAS pain scale.This short-term pilot study effectively shows that injectable, flowable amniotic allografts can be used for orthopedic sports injuries of the lower extremities.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: West Boca Medical Center, Boca Raton, FL.

ABSTRACT
Damaged connective tissue commonly leads to lower extremity injuries. These injuries can result in inflammation, reduced mobility, and chronic pain. Conservative treatment may include orthotics, offloading the injury, physical therapy, and/or NSAIDs. If conservative treatment fails, surgical intervention may be required. Even after successful surgery, these procedures often result in reduced joint mobility and tendon or ligament strength. A novel flowable tissue matrix allograft, derived from human placental connective tissue, has recently been made available for minimally invasive treatment of damaged or inadequate tissue  (PX50®, Human Regenerative Technologies LLC, Redondo Beach, CA). Based on the universal role of connective tissue in the body, and its reported antimicrobial, anti-adhesive, and anti-inflammatory properties, we assessed the effects of using this placental tissue matrix in the treatment of a series of lower extremity injuries. In this pilot study, 9 of 10 patients reported pain levels of 2 or less by week four using the VAS pain scale. This short-term pilot study effectively shows that injectable, flowable amniotic allografts can be used for orthopedic sports injuries of the lower extremities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Post-Injection Ultrasound Posterior Tibialis TendonThe ultrasound scan depicted shows both transverse (top) and longitudinal (bottom) planes of imaging. In the upper image, the measurement of the tendon two weeks post-injection shows a measurement of 0.21 cm, which is a normal tendon measurement. The bottom image shows a measurement of 0.24 cm, which also reflects a normal tendon measurement. This reflects a 90% to 95% reduction in inflammation and a good therapeutic response post-injection.
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FIG2: Post-Injection Ultrasound Posterior Tibialis TendonThe ultrasound scan depicted shows both transverse (top) and longitudinal (bottom) planes of imaging. In the upper image, the measurement of the tendon two weeks post-injection shows a measurement of 0.21 cm, which is a normal tendon measurement. The bottom image shows a measurement of 0.24 cm, which also reflects a normal tendon measurement. This reflects a 90% to 95% reduction in inflammation and a good therapeutic response post-injection.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows post-injection pathology at two weeks.


A Flowable Placental Tissue Matrix Allograft in Lower Extremity Injuries: A Pilot Study.

Lullove E - Cureus (2015)

Post-Injection Ultrasound Posterior Tibialis TendonThe ultrasound scan depicted shows both transverse (top) and longitudinal (bottom) planes of imaging. In the upper image, the measurement of the tendon two weeks post-injection shows a measurement of 0.21 cm, which is a normal tendon measurement. The bottom image shows a measurement of 0.24 cm, which also reflects a normal tendon measurement. This reflects a 90% to 95% reduction in inflammation and a good therapeutic response post-injection.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494536&req=5

FIG2: Post-Injection Ultrasound Posterior Tibialis TendonThe ultrasound scan depicted shows both transverse (top) and longitudinal (bottom) planes of imaging. In the upper image, the measurement of the tendon two weeks post-injection shows a measurement of 0.21 cm, which is a normal tendon measurement. The bottom image shows a measurement of 0.24 cm, which also reflects a normal tendon measurement. This reflects a 90% to 95% reduction in inflammation and a good therapeutic response post-injection.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows post-injection pathology at two weeks.

Bottom Line: Even after successful surgery, these procedures often result in reduced joint mobility and tendon or ligament strength.In this pilot study, 9 of 10 patients reported pain levels of 2 or less by week four using the VAS pain scale.This short-term pilot study effectively shows that injectable, flowable amniotic allografts can be used for orthopedic sports injuries of the lower extremities.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: West Boca Medical Center, Boca Raton, FL.

ABSTRACT
Damaged connective tissue commonly leads to lower extremity injuries. These injuries can result in inflammation, reduced mobility, and chronic pain. Conservative treatment may include orthotics, offloading the injury, physical therapy, and/or NSAIDs. If conservative treatment fails, surgical intervention may be required. Even after successful surgery, these procedures often result in reduced joint mobility and tendon or ligament strength. A novel flowable tissue matrix allograft, derived from human placental connective tissue, has recently been made available for minimally invasive treatment of damaged or inadequate tissue  (PX50®, Human Regenerative Technologies LLC, Redondo Beach, CA). Based on the universal role of connective tissue in the body, and its reported antimicrobial, anti-adhesive, and anti-inflammatory properties, we assessed the effects of using this placental tissue matrix in the treatment of a series of lower extremity injuries. In this pilot study, 9 of 10 patients reported pain levels of 2 or less by week four using the VAS pain scale. This short-term pilot study effectively shows that injectable, flowable amniotic allografts can be used for orthopedic sports injuries of the lower extremities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus