Limits...
Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations Associated with Heterotaxy.

Loomba R, Shah PH, Anderson RH - Cureus (2015)

Bottom Line: One such syndrome is so-called "visceral heterotaxy", in which there is typically an isomeric, rather than a lateralized, arrangement of the thoracic and abdominal organs.Typically associated with complex congenital cardiac malformations, heterotaxy can also involve the central nervous system, and produce pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immunologic, and genitourinary malformations.In this review, we discuss how these findings can be demonstrated using fetal MRI.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiology Dept., Children's Hospital of Wisconsin.

ABSTRACT
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as an investigation during fetal life, particularly for assessment of intracranial masses, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, myelomeningocele, and abdominal masses. As the number of scans increases, so is the variety of congenital malformations being recognized. It is axiomatic that interpretation of the findings is enhanced when attention is paid to the likely findings in the setting of known syndromes, this information then dictating the need for additional acquisition of images. One such syndrome is so-called "visceral heterotaxy", in which there is typically an isomeric, rather than a lateralized, arrangement of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Typically associated with complex congenital cardiac malformations, heterotaxy can also involve the central nervous system, and produce pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immunologic, and genitourinary malformations. In this review, we discuss how these findings can be demonstrated using fetal MRI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Abnormal abdominal situsT2-weighted HASTE image in the coronal plane demonstrating a right-sided stomach and left-sided liver. Image reprinted without change from Martin, et al. under the creative commons license. 
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494530&req=5

FIG15: Abnormal abdominal situsT2-weighted HASTE image in the coronal plane demonstrating a right-sided stomach and left-sided liver. Image reprinted without change from Martin, et al. under the creative commons license. 

Mentions: Gastrointestinal malformations are to be anticipated in heterotaxy, with abnormal lateralization of the abdominal organs being the rule. Historically, the position of the abdominal organs has been described in terms of situs solitus, situs inversus, or situs ambiguous. The true value of these terms, however, is limited. Use of “situs ambiguous”, in particular, implies unnecessary uncertainty since it does not provide any account of the location of the different organs. It is best simply to describe the lateralization in terms such as left-sided stomach and right-sided liver for so-called “situs solitus” (Figure 14), right-sided stomach and left-sided liver for “situs inversus” (Figure 15), and right- or left-sided stomach with midline liver for “situs ambiguous” (Figures 9-10). The gallbladder and the pancreas may also lie on the other side of the abdomen from what is expected.


Fetal Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Malformations Associated with Heterotaxy.

Loomba R, Shah PH, Anderson RH - Cureus (2015)

Abnormal abdominal situsT2-weighted HASTE image in the coronal plane demonstrating a right-sided stomach and left-sided liver. Image reprinted without change from Martin, et al. under the creative commons license. 
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494530&req=5

FIG15: Abnormal abdominal situsT2-weighted HASTE image in the coronal plane demonstrating a right-sided stomach and left-sided liver. Image reprinted without change from Martin, et al. under the creative commons license. 
Mentions: Gastrointestinal malformations are to be anticipated in heterotaxy, with abnormal lateralization of the abdominal organs being the rule. Historically, the position of the abdominal organs has been described in terms of situs solitus, situs inversus, or situs ambiguous. The true value of these terms, however, is limited. Use of “situs ambiguous”, in particular, implies unnecessary uncertainty since it does not provide any account of the location of the different organs. It is best simply to describe the lateralization in terms such as left-sided stomach and right-sided liver for so-called “situs solitus” (Figure 14), right-sided stomach and left-sided liver for “situs inversus” (Figure 15), and right- or left-sided stomach with midline liver for “situs ambiguous” (Figures 9-10). The gallbladder and the pancreas may also lie on the other side of the abdomen from what is expected.

Bottom Line: One such syndrome is so-called "visceral heterotaxy", in which there is typically an isomeric, rather than a lateralized, arrangement of the thoracic and abdominal organs.Typically associated with complex congenital cardiac malformations, heterotaxy can also involve the central nervous system, and produce pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immunologic, and genitourinary malformations.In this review, we discuss how these findings can be demonstrated using fetal MRI.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiology Dept., Children's Hospital of Wisconsin.

ABSTRACT
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as an investigation during fetal life, particularly for assessment of intracranial masses, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, myelomeningocele, and abdominal masses. As the number of scans increases, so is the variety of congenital malformations being recognized. It is axiomatic that interpretation of the findings is enhanced when attention is paid to the likely findings in the setting of known syndromes, this information then dictating the need for additional acquisition of images. One such syndrome is so-called "visceral heterotaxy", in which there is typically an isomeric, rather than a lateralized, arrangement of the thoracic and abdominal organs. Typically associated with complex congenital cardiac malformations, heterotaxy can also involve the central nervous system, and produce pulmonary, gastrointestinal, immunologic, and genitourinary malformations. In this review, we discuss how these findings can be demonstrated using fetal MRI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus