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A Retrospective Outcomes Study of 20 Sacroiliac Joint Fusion Patients.

Beck CE, Jacobson S, Thomasson E - Cureus (2015)

Bottom Line: All patients were diagnosed with sacroiliac joint pain based primarily on a positive response to fluoroscopically guided injections into the sacroiliac joint.Seventeen patients responded to post-surgery -follow-up questions, and 13 patients (76%), indicated they would elect to have the surgery again as well as recommend it to others.Average estimated blood loss was less than 50 mL, and average length of stay was one day.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Montana Neuroscience Institute.

ABSTRACT

Study design: Retrospective case series.

Purpose: To report a novel approach to open posterior sacroiliac (SI) joint arthrodesis using a threaded titanium cage containing rhBMP--2.

Materials & methods: Twenty consecutive patients with a mean age of 57.7 years (range: 33--84) underwent posterior SI joint fusion. Two closely related novel posterior oblique approaches were employed. Enrolled subjects included 17 females and three males. The mean follow--up time for CT to assess fusion was 27 months (range: 17--45 months). Insurance included a mixture of public and private payers. One of the patients (patient 19) was on worker's compensation. During follow--up, patients were assessed radiologically for radiographic bony union and asked to rate their satisfaction with the procedure. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was applied on a one-time basis upon follow-up. All patients were diagnosed with sacroiliac joint pain based primarily on a positive response to fluoroscopically guided injections into the sacroiliac joint.

Results: Out of 20 patients, 33 SI joints were considered symptomatic and operated, and 32/33 joints successfully fused radiographically (a 96.9% fusion success rate). The average procedure satisfaction rating (PSR) was 7.25 out of a maximum 10 (range 1--10). Seventeen patients responded to post-surgery -follow-up questions, and 13 patients (76%), indicated they would elect to have the surgery again as well as recommend it to others. Average estimated blood loss was less than 50 mL, and average length of stay was one day.

Conclusions: Preliminary experiences with these novel posterior approaches to the SI joint described here seem to be safe and effective. The novel posterior approaches to the SI joint described here appear, preliminarily, to have many advantages over previously described procedures including markedly reduced surgical morbidity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequency of PSRPSR: Procedure Satisfaction Rating
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FIG5: Frequency of PSRPSR: Procedure Satisfaction Rating

Mentions: The average procedure satisfaction rating (PSR) (as measured on a sliding 1­-10 scale with 1 being the least satisfactory and 10 being the most satisfactory) was 7.25 (Figure 5). A rating of 1­-5 was considered unsatisfactory while a rating of 6­-10 was considered satisfactory. Six patients rated the procedure the highest possible value of 10 while 15 patients (75%) gave a score of 7 or higher. This left only five patients (25%) with a score of lower than 7. As can be seen in Table 2, the patients who gave unsatisfactory scores all received the posterolateral procedure.


A Retrospective Outcomes Study of 20 Sacroiliac Joint Fusion Patients.

Beck CE, Jacobson S, Thomasson E - Cureus (2015)

Frequency of PSRPSR: Procedure Satisfaction Rating
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494528&req=5

FIG5: Frequency of PSRPSR: Procedure Satisfaction Rating
Mentions: The average procedure satisfaction rating (PSR) (as measured on a sliding 1­-10 scale with 1 being the least satisfactory and 10 being the most satisfactory) was 7.25 (Figure 5). A rating of 1­-5 was considered unsatisfactory while a rating of 6­-10 was considered satisfactory. Six patients rated the procedure the highest possible value of 10 while 15 patients (75%) gave a score of 7 or higher. This left only five patients (25%) with a score of lower than 7. As can be seen in Table 2, the patients who gave unsatisfactory scores all received the posterolateral procedure.

Bottom Line: All patients were diagnosed with sacroiliac joint pain based primarily on a positive response to fluoroscopically guided injections into the sacroiliac joint.Seventeen patients responded to post-surgery -follow-up questions, and 13 patients (76%), indicated they would elect to have the surgery again as well as recommend it to others.Average estimated blood loss was less than 50 mL, and average length of stay was one day.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Montana Neuroscience Institute.

ABSTRACT

Study design: Retrospective case series.

Purpose: To report a novel approach to open posterior sacroiliac (SI) joint arthrodesis using a threaded titanium cage containing rhBMP--2.

Materials & methods: Twenty consecutive patients with a mean age of 57.7 years (range: 33--84) underwent posterior SI joint fusion. Two closely related novel posterior oblique approaches were employed. Enrolled subjects included 17 females and three males. The mean follow--up time for CT to assess fusion was 27 months (range: 17--45 months). Insurance included a mixture of public and private payers. One of the patients (patient 19) was on worker's compensation. During follow--up, patients were assessed radiologically for radiographic bony union and asked to rate their satisfaction with the procedure. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was applied on a one-time basis upon follow-up. All patients were diagnosed with sacroiliac joint pain based primarily on a positive response to fluoroscopically guided injections into the sacroiliac joint.

Results: Out of 20 patients, 33 SI joints were considered symptomatic and operated, and 32/33 joints successfully fused radiographically (a 96.9% fusion success rate). The average procedure satisfaction rating (PSR) was 7.25 out of a maximum 10 (range 1--10). Seventeen patients responded to post-surgery -follow-up questions, and 13 patients (76%), indicated they would elect to have the surgery again as well as recommend it to others. Average estimated blood loss was less than 50 mL, and average length of stay was one day.

Conclusions: Preliminary experiences with these novel posterior approaches to the SI joint described here seem to be safe and effective. The novel posterior approaches to the SI joint described here appear, preliminarily, to have many advantages over previously described procedures including markedly reduced surgical morbidity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus