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Point of Technique: Protecting the Pedicle in Free Flap Breast Reconstruction from the Drain.

Emam A, Khan K, Prousskaia E - Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic Surgery, Southmead Hospital, Northbristol NHS Trust, Bristol, United Kingdom.

No MeSH data available.


Intraoperative view of mastectomy defect with two 12-gauge drains inserted for each upper and lower mastectomy flap.
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Figure 1: Intraoperative view of mastectomy defect with two 12-gauge drains inserted for each upper and lower mastectomy flap.

Mentions: We describe a simple technique to safely secure the breast drain tubing to prevent migration and hence protect the anastomotic site and pedicle after free tissue transfer breast reconstruction. In this technique, two 10-gauge suction drains are used, one for the upper breast mastectomy flap and one for the lower breast mastectomy flap. The drains are inserted before vessel exposure and after achieving meticulous hemostasis of the breast mastectomy flaps. Each drain is secured to the inner aspect of the breast mastectomy flap by a loose loop of absorbable monofilament 3/0 suture under direct vision. The loop diameter is one fingerbreadth diameter: this is sufficient to secure the drain in the desired location yet at the same time facilitate easy removal. This same technique can be applied to any other free tissue transfer situation to protect the pedicle from inadvertent damage from the drain tubing (Figs. 1 and 2).


Point of Technique: Protecting the Pedicle in Free Flap Breast Reconstruction from the Drain.

Emam A, Khan K, Prousskaia E - Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open (2015)

Intraoperative view of mastectomy defect with two 12-gauge drains inserted for each upper and lower mastectomy flap.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494489&req=5

Figure 1: Intraoperative view of mastectomy defect with two 12-gauge drains inserted for each upper and lower mastectomy flap.
Mentions: We describe a simple technique to safely secure the breast drain tubing to prevent migration and hence protect the anastomotic site and pedicle after free tissue transfer breast reconstruction. In this technique, two 10-gauge suction drains are used, one for the upper breast mastectomy flap and one for the lower breast mastectomy flap. The drains are inserted before vessel exposure and after achieving meticulous hemostasis of the breast mastectomy flaps. Each drain is secured to the inner aspect of the breast mastectomy flap by a loose loop of absorbable monofilament 3/0 suture under direct vision. The loop diameter is one fingerbreadth diameter: this is sufficient to secure the drain in the desired location yet at the same time facilitate easy removal. This same technique can be applied to any other free tissue transfer situation to protect the pedicle from inadvertent damage from the drain tubing (Figs. 1 and 2).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic Surgery, Southmead Hospital, Northbristol NHS Trust, Bristol, United Kingdom.

No MeSH data available.