Limits...
Low-cost Negative-pressure Wound Therapy Using Wall Vacuum: A 15 Dollars by Day Alternative.

Chaput B, Garrido I, Eburdery H, Grolleau JL, Chavoin JP - Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we report the feasibility and safety of this product, which we call PROVACUUM (Z-Biotech, Saint-Avertin, France).The surgeons found that our device was similar to commercial NPWT devices.We developed an inexpensive NPWT that costs an average of $15/d.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Rangueil University Hospital, Toulouse, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been marketed for about 20 years and remains popular. The only real obstacle to NPWT is the cost; therefore, we designed an inexpensive NPWT connected to a wall vacuum. Here, we report the feasibility and safety of this product, which we call PROVACUUM (Z-Biotech, Saint-Avertin, France).

Methods: As a first step, the constraints imposed on the manufacturer were equipment quality similar to that of commercial NPWT systems, with an average treatment cost of $15/d. Then, we conducted a prospective study of patients with indications for NPWT from September 2013 to January 2015. Data collected included ease of use, quality of materials, and occurrence of complications during treatment.

Results: We enrolled 23 patients with a mean age of 50.8 years. The average duration of treatment was 8.5 days (range, 3-21 days). The dressings were changed every 3.3 days (range, 2-4 days). Two hematomas occurred that required surgical revision and the transfusion of 2 units after large debridement of pressure ulcer. No other adverse events or infections occurred. The surgeons found that our device was similar to commercial NPWT devices.

Conclusions: We developed an inexpensive NPWT that costs an average of $15/d. Our process is not intended to replace portable or stand-alone devices with batteries, but rather offers a less expensive alternative for hospitalized patients and makes NPWT accessible to the most precarious countries and institutions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A, Electrical burn in a 79-year-old man with bone exposure on the inner side of the foot. B, Setting up PROVACUUM before attempting a skin graft. C, After 1 week of NPWT, a significant bone exposure persists in the middle of the wound. D, A split-thickness skin graft was performed after 3 weeks of NPWT. The wound healing is almost complete.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494488&req=5

Figure 3: A, Electrical burn in a 79-year-old man with bone exposure on the inner side of the foot. B, Setting up PROVACUUM before attempting a skin graft. C, After 1 week of NPWT, a significant bone exposure persists in the middle of the wound. D, A split-thickness skin graft was performed after 3 weeks of NPWT. The wound healing is almost complete.

Mentions: Two serious complications occurred in the first patients; namely, 2 hematomas developed after large pressure ulcer debridement, which required surgical revision and the transfusion of 2 units (Fig. 2). No other adverse events occurred, and no infections were reported. The surgeons who used our device found it as easy to use as commercial NPWT devices, except for the adhesive film (Fig. 3). Indeed, the initial attempts used inadequate adhesive film. We have subsequently improved the quality of the film.


Low-cost Negative-pressure Wound Therapy Using Wall Vacuum: A 15 Dollars by Day Alternative.

Chaput B, Garrido I, Eburdery H, Grolleau JL, Chavoin JP - Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open (2015)

A, Electrical burn in a 79-year-old man with bone exposure on the inner side of the foot. B, Setting up PROVACUUM before attempting a skin graft. C, After 1 week of NPWT, a significant bone exposure persists in the middle of the wound. D, A split-thickness skin graft was performed after 3 weeks of NPWT. The wound healing is almost complete.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4494488&req=5

Figure 3: A, Electrical burn in a 79-year-old man with bone exposure on the inner side of the foot. B, Setting up PROVACUUM before attempting a skin graft. C, After 1 week of NPWT, a significant bone exposure persists in the middle of the wound. D, A split-thickness skin graft was performed after 3 weeks of NPWT. The wound healing is almost complete.
Mentions: Two serious complications occurred in the first patients; namely, 2 hematomas developed after large pressure ulcer debridement, which required surgical revision and the transfusion of 2 units (Fig. 2). No other adverse events occurred, and no infections were reported. The surgeons who used our device found it as easy to use as commercial NPWT devices, except for the adhesive film (Fig. 3). Indeed, the initial attempts used inadequate adhesive film. We have subsequently improved the quality of the film.

Bottom Line: Here, we report the feasibility and safety of this product, which we call PROVACUUM (Z-Biotech, Saint-Avertin, France).The surgeons found that our device was similar to commercial NPWT devices.We developed an inexpensive NPWT that costs an average of $15/d.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Rangueil University Hospital, Toulouse, France.

ABSTRACT

Background: Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been marketed for about 20 years and remains popular. The only real obstacle to NPWT is the cost; therefore, we designed an inexpensive NPWT connected to a wall vacuum. Here, we report the feasibility and safety of this product, which we call PROVACUUM (Z-Biotech, Saint-Avertin, France).

Methods: As a first step, the constraints imposed on the manufacturer were equipment quality similar to that of commercial NPWT systems, with an average treatment cost of $15/d. Then, we conducted a prospective study of patients with indications for NPWT from September 2013 to January 2015. Data collected included ease of use, quality of materials, and occurrence of complications during treatment.

Results: We enrolled 23 patients with a mean age of 50.8 years. The average duration of treatment was 8.5 days (range, 3-21 days). The dressings were changed every 3.3 days (range, 2-4 days). Two hematomas occurred that required surgical revision and the transfusion of 2 units after large debridement of pressure ulcer. No other adverse events or infections occurred. The surgeons found that our device was similar to commercial NPWT devices.

Conclusions: We developed an inexpensive NPWT that costs an average of $15/d. Our process is not intended to replace portable or stand-alone devices with batteries, but rather offers a less expensive alternative for hospitalized patients and makes NPWT accessible to the most precarious countries and institutions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus