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Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis.

Niimi Y, Matsumine H, Takeuchi Y, Sasaki R, Watanabe Y, Yamato M, Miyata M, Sakurai H - Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve.Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve.In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Yachiyo Medical Center, Yachiyo-shi, Chiba, Japan; Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Physiology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; and Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Global Center of Excellence (COE) Program, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model.

Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve.

Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed.

Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Retrograde tracer findings of IPJGs at postoperative week 13 in the autograft (A and C) and silicone tube (B and D) groups. DiI and DiO, fluorescent retrograde tracers, were injected into the whisker pads and tongue, respectively. The left and right columns show IPJGs with autograft and in silicone tube conduit, respectively. The upper and lower rows show the observations at facial nerve nucleus (7N) and hypoglossal nucleus (12N), respectively. A, DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) were found to be mixed with DiI-positive (red) motor neurons in 7N of the autograft group. C, In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus, DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead), which were mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons, had an irregular arrangement (white arrowhead). B, Similarly, a mixture of DiI-positive (red) motor neurons and DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) in 7N were found in the silicone tube group. D, In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus, DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead) mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons had an irregular arrangement. The results confirmed the double innervation of the facial muscles of expression and the tongue by 7N and 12N. Unusual labelings after IPJG treatments were indicated with white arrows and white arrowheads.
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Figure 7: Retrograde tracer findings of IPJGs at postoperative week 13 in the autograft (A and C) and silicone tube (B and D) groups. DiI and DiO, fluorescent retrograde tracers, were injected into the whisker pads and tongue, respectively. The left and right columns show IPJGs with autograft and in silicone tube conduit, respectively. The upper and lower rows show the observations at facial nerve nucleus (7N) and hypoglossal nucleus (12N), respectively. A, DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) were found to be mixed with DiI-positive (red) motor neurons in 7N of the autograft group. C, In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus, DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead), which were mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons, had an irregular arrangement (white arrowhead). B, Similarly, a mixture of DiI-positive (red) motor neurons and DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) in 7N were found in the silicone tube group. D, In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus, DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead) mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons had an irregular arrangement. The results confirmed the double innervation of the facial muscles of expression and the tongue by 7N and 12N. Unusual labelings after IPJG treatments were indicated with white arrows and white arrowheads.

Mentions: To investigate bidirectional nerve regeneration, DiI and DiO, which are fluorescent retrograde tracers, were injected into the whisker pads and tongue, respectively. At postoperative week 13, the retrograde tracer findings showed a mixture of DiI-positive (red) motor neurons and DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) in the facial nerve nucleus (7N) in the autograft group (Fig. 7A). In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus (12N), DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead), which were mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons, had an irregular arrangement (Fig. 7C). Similarly, in the silicone tube group, a mixture of DiI-positive motor neurons and DiO-positive motor neurons (white arrow) was found in 7N (Fig. 7B). In 12N, DiI-positive motor neurons (white arrowhead) mixed with DiO-positive motor neurons had an irregular arrangement (Fig. 7D). These results confirmed the double innervation of the facial muscles of expression and the tongue by 7N and 12N.


Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis.

Niimi Y, Matsumine H, Takeuchi Y, Sasaki R, Watanabe Y, Yamato M, Miyata M, Sakurai H - Plast Reconstr Surg Glob Open (2015)

Retrograde tracer findings of IPJGs at postoperative week 13 in the autograft (A and C) and silicone tube (B and D) groups. DiI and DiO, fluorescent retrograde tracers, were injected into the whisker pads and tongue, respectively. The left and right columns show IPJGs with autograft and in silicone tube conduit, respectively. The upper and lower rows show the observations at facial nerve nucleus (7N) and hypoglossal nucleus (12N), respectively. A, DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) were found to be mixed with DiI-positive (red) motor neurons in 7N of the autograft group. C, In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus, DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead), which were mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons, had an irregular arrangement (white arrowhead). B, Similarly, a mixture of DiI-positive (red) motor neurons and DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) in 7N were found in the silicone tube group. D, In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus, DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead) mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons had an irregular arrangement. The results confirmed the double innervation of the facial muscles of expression and the tongue by 7N and 12N. Unusual labelings after IPJG treatments were indicated with white arrows and white arrowheads.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 7: Retrograde tracer findings of IPJGs at postoperative week 13 in the autograft (A and C) and silicone tube (B and D) groups. DiI and DiO, fluorescent retrograde tracers, were injected into the whisker pads and tongue, respectively. The left and right columns show IPJGs with autograft and in silicone tube conduit, respectively. The upper and lower rows show the observations at facial nerve nucleus (7N) and hypoglossal nucleus (12N), respectively. A, DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) were found to be mixed with DiI-positive (red) motor neurons in 7N of the autograft group. C, In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus, DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead), which were mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons, had an irregular arrangement (white arrowhead). B, Similarly, a mixture of DiI-positive (red) motor neurons and DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) in 7N were found in the silicone tube group. D, In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus, DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead) mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons had an irregular arrangement. The results confirmed the double innervation of the facial muscles of expression and the tongue by 7N and 12N. Unusual labelings after IPJG treatments were indicated with white arrows and white arrowheads.
Mentions: To investigate bidirectional nerve regeneration, DiI and DiO, which are fluorescent retrograde tracers, were injected into the whisker pads and tongue, respectively. At postoperative week 13, the retrograde tracer findings showed a mixture of DiI-positive (red) motor neurons and DiO-positive (green) motor neurons (white arrow) in the facial nerve nucleus (7N) in the autograft group (Fig. 7A). In the hypoglossal nerve nucleus (12N), DiI-positive (red) motor neurons (white arrowhead), which were mixed with DiO-positive (green) motor neurons, had an irregular arrangement (Fig. 7C). Similarly, in the silicone tube group, a mixture of DiI-positive motor neurons and DiO-positive motor neurons (white arrow) was found in 7N (Fig. 7B). In 12N, DiI-positive motor neurons (white arrowhead) mixed with DiO-positive motor neurons had an irregular arrangement (Fig. 7D). These results confirmed the double innervation of the facial muscles of expression and the tongue by 7N and 12N.

Bottom Line: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve.Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve.In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Yachiyo Medical Center, Yachiyo-shi, Chiba, Japan; Institute of Advanced Biomedical Engineering and Science, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Physiology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; and Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Global Center of Excellence (COE) Program, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model.

Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve.

Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed.

Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus